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Deanna Masters medal
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City PhD student recognised by Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers

The Master's Medal is directed specifically at those making their initial 'first author' published contribution to the advancement of optometry or physiological optics

by George Wigmore (Senior Communications Officer)

Deanna Taylor, a PhD researcher working in the Crabb Lab at City, University of London has won a prestigious Master’s Medal prize from the Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers for her research into the real life impact of dry age-related macular degeneration.

The Master's Medal, also known as a Bronze award, and the purse of £750 is directed specifically at those making their initial 'first author' published contribution to the advancement of optometry or physiological optics. The presentation was made at an awards ceremony at Apothecaries’ Hall in London on the 4th October 2017.

In particular, Deanna’s award was for her paper “Searching for Objects in Everyday Scenes: Measuring Performance in People With Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration”, which highlights the difficulties that people with different severities of dry age-related macular degeneration can have with a visual search, an important everyday task. The paper can be accessed here.

The Bronze Medals are the subject of a competition, publicised among universities, colleges and medical and optical institutions each Spring. Competition winners are invited to receive their medal at a lunch at Apothecaries' Hall, so that their work can be recognised and rewarded publicly by the Master, Wardens and Court of Assistants.

Speaking about the award, Deanna said:

“It is a huge honour to have received the Master’s Medal for this paper. The study has implications for management and rehabilitation of people with dry age-related macular degeneration and our methods also have the potential to be used as a meaningful ‘real-world’ outcome for clinical trials. I very much hope that this paper will lead to greater awareness and understanding of the impact of dry age-related macular degeneration on people’s day-to-day lives.”

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