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  1. Lucy Dipper
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Contact Information

Contact

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Background

Lucy is a clinical linguist with a particular interest in aphasia, right hemisphere communication disorder and specific language impairment. She joined City University in 2000, and previously worked at University College London. Lucy studied Linguistics at Sussex University and then undertook both her Masters and PhD at University College London.  Her Masters project investigated pragmatic skills in right hemisphere communication disorder and her PhD thesis explored links between thought and language, by examining verb problems in aphasia.  Since then Lucy's research has continued to focus on thought and language in a range of communication problems, especially aphasia. 

Qualifications

PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons)

Professional Bodies

- British Association of Clinical Linguists
- British Aphasiology Society
- International Society of Gesture Studies

Clinical Activity

Linguistic consultancy in the City Aphasia Clinic and the City Aphasia Reading Clinic.

Research

Research Overview

Lucy's research interests include language and language disorder, with a particular interest in aphasia. Lucy and a colleague (Naomi Cocks - Curtin University, Perth, Austraia) recently completed a project funded by the Dunhill Medical Trust to explore the relationship between gesture and language skills in aphasia. Their results suggested that impairment to the language system (aphasia) is reflected in gesture, supporting the prevailing idea that language and gesture are strongly linked in processing terms. They also suggest that analysis of spontaneous co-speech is an important addition to the speech and language therapists' assessment toolkit.

Lucy and another colleague (Madeline Cruice - LCS, City University, London) are currently exploring the skills of people with aphasia across various communication genres. Supported by City University funds, they have carried out an exploratory analysis of the language used by people with aphasia when discussing their quality of life. This is an exciting new collaboration providing a unique opportunity to blend clinical linguistics with quality of life research. They found evidence for both intact and
impaired verb production in aphasia, with some surprising resilience in the range of meaning conveyed. There was also clear heterogeneity within both participant samples
challenges assumptions of normality and typicality.

Currently Madeleine, Lucy and Rachael Anne Knight are running a pilot project looking at language and communication in personal storytelling, and they will be seeking funding for a larger-scale version in 2015.

Research Areas

- Linguistics
- Communication Disorders

Research Centre

- LCS research group membership: Aphasia Research Group
- Assessment and Intervention in Children and Adults
- Deafness, Sign Language and Gesture
- Speech, Acoustics and Linguistics
- Quality of Life and Social aspects of Communication Disorders
- UCL research group membership: Aphasia Research Group

Collaborators

Madeline Cruice (LCS, City)
Rachael Anne Knight (LCS, City
Naomi Cocks (Curtin, Perth, Australia)
Gary Morgan (LCS, City)
Abigail Levin (LCS, City)
Nicola Botting (LCS, City)
Katerina Hilari (LCS, City)

Research Students

Name
Lara Galante
Thesis Title
validating the Dutch Scenario Test for English-speaking people with Aphasia
Name
Judith Kistner
Thesis Title
Gesture & aphasia
Name
Hannah Hockey
Thesis Title
Word & non-word repetition in SLI
Name
Ioanna Georgiadou
Thesis Title
Rhythmn and prosody in SLI
Name
Madeleine Pritchard
Thesis Title
Working beyond the sentence: language for discourse in Aphasia

Publications

Conference Papers and Proceedings (5)

  1. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2015). Semantisch reiche Gesten und ihre Funktion im Gespräch. 15. Aphasietagung der GAB 5-7 November, Innsbruck.
  2. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2015). The role of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. Science of Aphasia 17 Sep 2015 – 24 Nov 2015, Aveiro.
  3. (2015). The role of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. BAS Conference 9-11 September, London.
  4. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2014). Die Funktion semantisch reicher Gesten im Gespraech bei Aphasie. 14. Aphasietagung der GAB 6-8 November, Freiburg, Germany.
  5. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2014). The use of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 18-20 June, The Hague, The Netherlands.

Journal Articles (24)

  1. Botting, N., Dipper, L. and Hilari, K. (2017). The effect of social media promotion on academic article uptake. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(3), pp. 795–800. doi:10.1002/asi.23704.
  2. Pritchard, M., Hilari, K., Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. (2017). Reviewing the quality of discourse information measures in aphasia. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12318.
  3. Burdon, P., Dipper, L. and Cocks, N. (2016). Exploration of older and younger British adults’ performance on The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT). International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 51(5), pp. 589–593. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12233.
  4. Knight, R.A., Dipper, L. and Cruice, M. (2016). Viva survivors – the effect of peer-mentoring on pre-viva anxiety in early-years students. Studies in Higher Education pp. 1–10. doi:10.1080/03075079.2016.1161018.
  5. Burdon, P., Dipper, L. and Cocks, N. (2016). Exploration of older and younger British adults' performance on The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT). International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12233.
  6. Ivanszky, Z., Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. (2015). A pilot study exploring public awareness and knowledge of right hemisphere communication disorder compared with aphasia and stroke in Northwest London, UK. Aphasiology, 30(9), pp. 1058–1070. doi:10.1080/02687038.2015.1081141.
  7. (2015). TOT Phenomena: Gesture Production in Younger and Older Adults. Psychology and Aging . doi:10.1037/a0038913.
  8. Pritchard, M., Dipper, L., Morgan, G. and Cocks, N. (2015). Language and iconic gesture use in procedural discourse by speakers with aphasia. Aphasiology, 29(7), pp. 826–844. doi:10.1080/02687038.2014.993912.
  9. Dipper, L., Pritchard, M., Morgan, G. and Cocks, N. (2015). The language-gesture connection: Evidence from aphasia. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 29(8-10), pp. 748–763. doi:10.3109/02699206.2015.1036462.
  10. Hickin, J., Mehta, B. and Dipper, L. (2015). To the sentence and beyond: a single case therapy report for mild aphasia. Aphasiology, 29(9), pp. 1038–1061. doi:10.1080/02687038.2015.1010474.
  11. Cruice, M., Pritchard, M. and Dipper, L. (2014). Verb use in aphasic and non-aphasic personal discourse: What is normal? Journal of Neurolinguistics, 28, pp. 31–47. doi:10.1016/j.jneuroling.2013.12.002.
  12. Knight, R.A., Dipper, L. and Cruice, M. (2013). The use of video in addressing anxiety prior to viva voce exams. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(6) . doi:10.1111/bjet.12090.
  13. Pritchard, M., Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. (2013). Iconic gesture in normal language and word searching conditions: A case of conduction aphasia. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15(5), pp. 524–534. doi:10.3109/17549507.2012.712157.
  14. Cocks, N., Dipper, L., Pritchard, M. and Morgan, G. (2013). The impact of impaired semantic knowledge on spontaneous iconic gesture production. Aphasiology, 27(9), pp. 1050–1069. doi:10.1080/02687038.2013.770816.
  15. Johnson, S., Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. (2013). Use of spatial communication in aphasia. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 48(4), pp. 469–476. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12022.
  16. Dipper, L., Cocks, N., Rowe, M. and Morgan, G. (2011). What can co-speech gestures in aphasia tell us about the relationship between language and gesture?: A single case study of a participant with Conduction Aphasia. Gesture, 11(2), pp. 123–147. doi:10.1075/gest.11.2.02dip.
  17. Cocks, N., Dipper, L., Middleton, R. and Morgan, G.D. (2011). What can iconic gestures tell us about the language system? A case of conduction aphasia. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 46(4), pp. 423–436. doi:10.3109/13682822.2010.520813.
  18. Harding, C., Lindsay, G., O'Brien, A., Dipper, L.T. and Wright, J. (2011). Implementing AAC with children with profound and multiple learning disabilities: a study in rationale underpinning intervention. The Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 11(2), pp. 120–129. doi:10.1111/j.1471-3802.2010.01184.x.
  19. Cairns, D., Marshall, J., Cairns, P. and Dipper, L. (2007). Event processing through naming: Investigating event focus in two people with aphasia. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22(2), pp. 201–233. doi:10.1080/01690960500489644.
  20. Patricacou, A., Psallida, E., Pring, T. and Dipper, L.T. (2007). The Boston Naming Test in Greek: Normative data and the effects of age and education on naming. Aphasiology, 21(12), pp. 1157–1170. doi:10.1080/02687030600670643.
  21. Cairns, D., Marshall, J., Cairns, P. and Dipper, L.T. (2007). Event Processing through naming: Investigating eveny focus in two people with aphasia. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22(2), pp. 201–233. doi:10.1080/01690960500489644.
  22. Dipper, L.T., Black, M. and Bryan, K.L. (2005). Thinking for speaking and thinking for listening: The interaction of thought and language in typical and non-fluent comprehension and production. Language and Cognitive Processes, 20(3), pp. 417–441. doi:10.1080/01690960444000089.
  23. Chiat, S., Dipper, L.T. and McKiernan, A. (2001). Redressing the Balance. Advances in Speech Language Pathology, 3(1), pp. 63–66.
  24. Dipper, L.T., Bryan, K.L. and Tyson, J. (1997). Bridging inference and Relevance Theory: An account of right hemisphere inference. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 11(3), pp. 213–228.

Education

UndergraduateTeaching

- SL1005 Language Sciences (1)
I teach the Linguistics strand of this module

- SL2004 Language Sciences (2)
I teach the Language Development strand of this module

Postgraduate Teaching

- SLM003 Developmental Studies
I teach the Language Development strand of this module

- SLM001 Speech and Language Sciences
I am providing sabbatical cover for the Linguistics strand of this module

- HCM003 Cognitive and Communication Impairments
Module Leader, and cognition in aphasia teaching.

- HCM001 Acquired Language Impairments
Sentence and Discourse level assessment and therapy

Other teaching expertise

Sociolinguistics, Psycholinguistics.

Other Activities

Events/Conferences (8)

  1. Semantic Knowledge and Co-Speech Gesture Production in Aphasia. Exeter University, UK (2013).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Research Update meeting (oral presentation).
  2. To the sentence and beyond: therapy for mild aphasia. Thoughts on assessment, therapy and outcome measures from therapist, linguist and client. Melbourne, Australia (2012).
    Description: 15th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference (oral presentation- 2nd author).
  3. Iconic Gesture Production in Aphasia. Reading University, UK (2011).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial International Conference, poster presentation.
  4. Linguistic analysis of quality of life responses reveals lexical diversity in verbs in aphasia. Reading University, UK (2011).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial International Conference, oral presentation - 2nd author.
  5. What can word-finding gestures in Aphasia tell us about the language system? European University Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder, Germany (2010).
    Description: 4th Conference of the International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS), oral presentation.
  6. Gesture production and aphasia: a single case study of a woman with conduction aphasia. Sheffield University, UK (2009).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial International Conference, poster.
  7. Co-speech iconic gesture production in aphasia: a single case study. Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland (2009).
    Description: Gesture and Speech in Interaction Conference, oral presentation.
  8. The relationship between impaired language and iconic gesture production: motion verbs. Lund, Sweden
    Description: PANEL: Gesture Production by people who have Communication Impairments. Oral presentation. Co-chair. 4th Conference of the International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS).

Find us

City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

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