Research
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  1. Research ethics
  2. City research ethics governance
  3. Policy on research involving animals
Research

Policy on research involving animals

  1. The University does not undertake any research on University premises that requires licensed approval under the ‘Animals in (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 Amendment Regulations 2012’ (ASPA) (see Appendix 1)

  2. Members of City University London do undertake research covered by the ASPA in collaboration with other institutions. On such occasions the research will be subject to that institution’s ethical procedures. Where the University is the sponsor of the research or the PI is from the University, Senate Research Ethics Committee (SREC) must make a judgement of the appropriateness of that institution’s ethical procedures, and approval managed accordingly. Documents showing ethical approval for the research must be submitted to SREC.

  3. Members of the university may be involved in less invasive work on animals on University premises that is not subject to the ASPA (see Appendix 2 for examples). Such work must be approved by SREC and comply with the ‘Animal Welfare Act 2006.

  4. The University performs research that uses animal tissue obtained from animals sacrificed outside the University by recognised institutions such as zoos and other universities. If such tissue is from endangered species, from an unlicensed source, contains potentially harmful agents (both biological and chemical), or genetically modified material, it must be considered by SREC.

  5. All research involving animals, whatever its nature, carried out by members of City University London must consider the 3Rs;
    • Replacement (use of animal cells or if possible non‐animal alternatives)
    • Reduction (using fewer animals)
    • Refinement (minimise pain and enhance welfare throughout an animal’s life)

  6. Staff and students may opt out of research involving animals.

Approved by Senate December 2016

Appendix 1

The ‘Animals in (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 Amendment Regulations 2012’ applies to any species of living vertebrate or cephalopod where an intervention is likely to cause the animal pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm equivalent to, or higher than, that caused by the introduction of a needle in accordance with good veterinary practice.

It also applies to embryonic and foetal forms of mammals, birds and reptiles once they have reached the final third of their gestation.

Larval forms of fish and amphibians are also protected once they are capable of feeding independently.

Any intervention carried out at an earlier developmental stage that will involve the subsequent birth or hatching of a protected species is also within the scope of this legislation.

Appendix 2

Although City University London does not undertake any research on University premises that requires licensed approval under the ‘Animals in (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 Amendment Regulations 2012’ (ASPA), it does carry out less invasive procedures.

The following is a non‐exhaustive list of the types of procedures that might be performed. It is not a list of the procedures currently performed at City University London, and is simply for illustrative purposes. Such work might include;

  • invertebrates (apart from cephalopods);
  • mammals, birds and reptiles within the first two‐thirds of gestation;
  • larval forms of fish and amphibians before they are capable of independent feeding;
  • ringing, tagging or marking animals primarily for identification purposes if the method causes no more than momentary pain and no lasting harm;
  • non‐experimental practices undertaken for the purposes of recognised animal husbandry as long as they comply with other animal welfare legislation or regulations;
  • the euthanasia of animals by approved (schedule 1) methods;
  • the non‐invasive observation of unrestrained animals, or any research intervention that is unlikely to cause the animal pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm equivalent to, or higher than, that caused by the introduction of a needle in accordance with good veterinary practice .