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Contact Information

Contact

Visit Madeline Cruice

M101, Myddelton Street Building

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Overview

Madeline is a Reader/ Associate Professor and speech and language therapist specialising in quality of life in aphasia who joined City, University of London in 2002.

Recent Grants

Wray, F., Forster, A., Clarke, D. & Cruice, M. Feasibility study of supported self-management for stroke survivors with aphasia (StarStep study). The Stroke Association, £174,961. October 2019 - September 2021.

Dipper, L., Cruice, M., Pritchard, M., Botting, N., & Laybourne, A. Storytelling in Older Adults in Residential Settings (STARs). Dunhill Medical Trust, £90,996. September 2019 - March 2021.

Cruice, M. (PI), Dipper, L. (Joint PI), Marshall, J., Botting, N., Boyle, M., & Hersh, D. with Pritchard, M. Linguistic Underpinnings of Narrative in Aphasia (LUNA): A proof-of-concept study of a novel discourse treatment for aphasia using personal narratives. The Stroke Association, £205,257. May 2018 - January 2021.

Wilson, S., Marshall, J., Cruice, M., & Roper, A. INCA: Inclusive Digital Content for people with Aphasia. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, £496,294. July 2017 - June 2020.

Marshall, J., Wilson, S., Woolf, C., Cruice, M., & Patel, A. Delivering group support for people with aphasia through a virtual communication environment. The Stroke Association, £158,111. January 2017 - April 2019.

Marshall, J., Woolf, C., Cruice, M., Wilson, S., & Stokes, C. Enhancing communication in aphasia through technology (CommuniCATE). Barts Charity, £415,785. July 2014 - June 2017.

Biography

Madeline initially studied and worked at the University of Queensland, Australia, where her degree and PhD were in speech pathology. Her key interests at doctoral level were modelling the relationship between communication and quality in older adults with and without aphasia (an acquired communication disorder post-stroke); and investigating bias in participant-proxy respondent reporting on quality of life measures. She worked conjointly with the Royal Brisbane Hospital, and was involved in the foundation of the Australian Aphasia Association. In late 2002, she moved to City, University of London. Her main area of work has been the application of quality of life in adult clinical practice, with particular interests in psychosocial wellbeing, goal setting and outcome measures, and the impact of aphasia on the process of quality of life evaluation. Within education, she has pioneered the development of new clinical placements within the voluntary sector, and developed the Classroom-to-Clinic skills programme and the Communication Skills Intensive, which accelerate students' learning of core clinical skills in paediatrics and adults. Whilst at City, she has worked in secondments with Connect – the communication disability network, the Homerton Regional NeuroRehabilitation Unit, and with communication support groups within The Stroke Association.

Administrative Roles

- Chairing Team Member for the National Institute of Health Research Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship Scheme
- Aphasia Advisory Board Member for The Stroke Association
- Review for Aphasiology, International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Disability & Rehabilitation, and Clinical Rehabilitation journals
- Programme Director for the MRes Clinical Research, School of Health Sciences (2014-2017)

Qualifications

  1. Doctor of Philosophy in Speech Pathology, University of Queensland, Australia, 1998 – 2001
  2. Bachelor in Speech Pathology (Hons I), University of Queensland, Australia, 1994 – 1997

Fellowships

  1. Fellow, Higher Education Academy, Dec 2011 – present

Memberships of professional organisations

  1. Chairing Team Member, National Institute of Health Research Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship Scheme, Mar 2015 – present
  2. Lead of the Societal Impact and Reintegration Research Working Group, Collaboration of Aphasia Trialists, May 2014 – present
  3. Registered Speech and Language Therapist, Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)
  4. Certified Member, Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT)

Awards

  1. City, University of London (2016) Vice Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Contribution to Local Community
  2. City, University of London (2016) Research Supervision Award
  3. City, University of London (2011) Student Voice Award
  4. School of Health Sciences (2011) Teaching Award
  5. The University of Queensland (1999) Walter and Eliza Hall Travelling Scholarship

Research

Research Overview

Madeline's core research interests lie in understanding the relationships between communication impairment, activity and participation (WHO ICF) with wellbeing and quality of life in individuals who live with aphasia, so that speech and language therapy intervention is best targeted for maximum effect. She has a particular interest in the impact of self-report questionnaires on subsequent goal setting and treatment planning; and the influence of aphasia on individuals' abilities to express thoughts, feelings, and opinions when reflecting on quality of life. Her current work explores the use of self-report measures of quality of life, wellbeing, and activities, in normal and aphasic individuals, in the community and clinical practice settings; and the impact of reading intervention on psychosocial and wellbeing outcomes in aphasia.

Research Areas

- Wellbeing
- Health-Related Quality of life
- Aphasiology

Collaborators

- Dr Lucy Dipper (internal)
- Professor Jane Marshall (internal)
- Dr Naomi Cocks (external)
- Professor Linda Worrall (external)
- Professor Louise Hickson (external)
- Dr Kate Swinburn (external)

Grants

- £2,300. Cruice, M., Cheasman, C., & Everard, R. Impact of counselling skills training on students speech and language therapists. Learning Development Project, City University London.

- £3,300. Cruice, M. Capturing student learning and progression: Clinical skills development and reflective practice. Learning Development Project, City University London.

- £4,999. Farrington-Douglas, C., Cruice, M., & Heron, C. Developing an OSCE to evaluate speech and language therapy students' clinical and communication skills. Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) Clinical and Communication Skills Seedcorn Grant.

- £97,292. Marshall, J., Pring, T., Cocks, N., Cruice, M., Hickin, J., & Best, W. Enhancing communication in aphasia through gesture. Stroke Association UK.

- £19,315. Cruice, M. Enhancing SLT students' clinical and communication skills in setting goals with patients and clients in adult neurological acute, rehabilitation and community settings. Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) Clinical and Communication Skills Spotlight Project Grant.

Research Students

PhD Student: Katie Monnelly

Attendance: Oct 2019 – Sep 2022, full-time

Thesis title: Feasibility and acceptability of developing a co-produced intensive and comprehensive aphasia programme

Role: 1st Supervisor

PhD Student: Kathryn VandenBerg

Attendance: Jun 2017 – Jun 2020, full-time

Thesis title: An investigation of social peer support for people with aphasia

Role: External Supervisor

Further information: Collaboration of Aphasia Trialists PhD Studentship, Glasgow Caledonian University

PhD Student: Camille Paynter

Attendance: Jan 2017 – Dec 2019, full-time

Thesis title: A longitudinal study of involvement in health care decision-making in motor neurone disease: Patient and caregiver perceptions, impact of communication and swallowing difficulties, and quality of life

Role: External Supervisor

Further information: University of Melbourne

PhD Student: Julie Hickin

Attendance: Oct 2016 – Oct 2019, full-time

Thesis title: An investigation into the feasibility of computer-delivered treatment for sentence production deficits in aphasia, with preliminary efficacy testing.

Role: 2nd Supervisor

PhD Graduate: Nicholas Behn

Attendance: May 2016, full-time

Thesis title: Communication and quality of life outcomes in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) following project-based treatment

Role: 2nd Supervisor

PhD Graduate: Anneline Huck

Attendance: Feb 2016, part-time

Thesis title: The influence of word frequency and contextual predictability on eye movements in sentence reading in aphasia

Role: 2nd Supervisor

PhD Graduate: Brígida Patrício

Attendance: Feb 2015, full-time

Thesis title: The impact of communication disability in people's with aphasia and their relatives' quality of life

Role: External Supervisor

Further information: University of Aveiro, Portugal

PhD Student: Rachel Barnard

Attendance: Oct 2014 – Oct 2019, part-time

Thesis title: An ethnographic study of speech and language therapist and nurse communication in inpatient stroke care

Role: 1st Supervisor

PhD Graduate: Assunção de Coehlo de Matos

Attendance: May 2012, part-time

Thesis title: Levels of Activity and Participation of Persons with Aphasia: Developing Portuguese Evaluation Instruments

Role: External Supervisor

Further information: University of Aveiro, Portugal

Masters Graduate: Olivia Ten Kate

Thesis title: Increasing everyday use of wellbeing and health-related quality of life measures

Role: 1st Supervisor

Further information: Masters in Speech and Language Therapy Student

Publications

Books (3)

  1. Joffe, V, , Cruice, M. and Chiat, S. (Eds.), (2008). Language disorders in children and adults. Wiley. ISBN 978-0-470-51839-7.
  2. Joffe, V., Cruice, M. and Chiat, S. (2008). Language Disorders in Children and Adults. Wiley. ISBN 978-0-470-98790-2.
  3. Joffe, V., Cruice, M. and Chiat, S. (2008). Language Disorders in Children and Adults. Wiley. ISBN 978-0-470-98790-2.

Chapters (10)

  1. Cruice, M. (2015). Social participation and Aphasia. Routledge Handbook of Communication Disorders (pp. 355–366). ISBN 978-0-203-56924-5.
  2. Cruice, M., Cocks, N., Lancashire, T., Midgley, S. and The Morgan Family, (2011). "You’ve got to realise when you have a stroke it’s a stroke for life". In Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (Eds.), The impact of communication disability across the lifespan (pp. 279–298). Croydon, London: J & R Press Ltd. ISBN 978-1-907826-03-0.
  3. Cruice, M. and Vroman, K. (2010). Alternatives to fieldwork including service learning and case based teaching: Issues and possibilities. In McAllister, L., Paterson, M., Higgs, J. and Bithell, C. (Eds.), Innovations in allied health fieldwork education: A critical appraisal (pp. 179–188). The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.
  4. Cruice, M. (2010). The role of wellbeing in the quality of life for the person with acquired communication impairments. In Brumfitt, S. (Ed.), Psychological well-being in the person with acquired communicaton problems (pp. 86–115). London: John Wiley and Sons Ltd..
  5. Cruice, M. and Penman, T. (2009). Involving and engaging users with communication disability in consultations about health and health services. In Bryan, K. (Ed.), Communication in halthcare (pp. 165–207). Oxford: Peter Lang.
  6. Cruice, M., Hill, R., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2008). Comparing and contrasting views: Building consensus around quality of life with aphasia. In Joffe, V., Cruice, M. and Chiat, S. (Eds.), Language disorders in children and adults: New issues in research and practice (pp. 98–121). London: Wiley-Blackwell.
  7. Cruice, M., Joffe, V. and Chiat, M. (2008). An introduction to language disorders in children and adults: New and different themes, issues and connections. In Cruice, M., Joffe, V. and Chiat, M. (Eds.), Language disorders in children and adults: New issues in research and practice (p. xi). London: Wiley-Blackwell.
  8. Cruice, M. and Hilari, K. Quality of life approach to aphasia. In Papathanasiou, I. and Coppens, P. (Eds.), Aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders Jones and Bartlett Publishers, LLC..
  9. Cruice, M., Marshall, J. and Hilari, K. Communication. In Williams, J. and Perry L, L. (Eds.), Acute stroke nursing (pp. 184–204). London: Blackwell Publishing Ltd..
  10. Marshall, J., Hilari, K., Cruice, M. and Harrison, K. Acute Stroke Nursing (second edition). In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing Wiley-Blackwell.

Conference papers and proceedings (3)

  1. Barnard, R., Cruice, M. and Jones, J. (2018). Researching Across Two Cultures: Shifting Positionality.
  2. Patricio, B.F., Jesus, L.M.T., Cruice, M. and Hall, A. (2012). Quality of life predictors for Portuguese general population.
  3. Patricio, B.F., Jesus, L.M.T., Cruice, M. and Hall, A. (2012). Limitations of the social relationships domain of WHOQOL-Bref.

Journal articles (62)

  1. Swinburn, K., Best, W., Beeke, S., Cruice, M., Smith, L., Pearce Willis, E. … McVicker, S.J. (2019). A concise patient reported outcome measure for people with aphasia: the aphasia impact questionnaire 21. Aphasiology, 33(9), pp. 1035–1060. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1517406.
  2. Cruice, M. and Ten Kate, O. (2019). Clinicians’ views and practices in quality of life in aphasia rehabilitation: a preliminary study. Aphasiology pp. 1–26. doi:10.1080/02687038.2019.1632787.
  3. Behn, N., Marshall, J., Togher, L. and Cruice, M. (2019). Feasibility and initial efficacy of project-based treatment for people with ABI. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 54(3), pp. 465–478. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12452.
  4. Trebilcock, M., Worrall, L., Ryan, B., Shrubsole, K., Jagoe, C., Simmons-Mackie, N. … Le Dorze, G. (2019). Increasing the intensity and comprehensiveness of aphasia services: identification of key factors influencing implementation across six countries. Aphasiology pp. 1–23. doi:10.1080/02687038.2019.1602860.
  5. Caute, A., Cruice, M., Marshall, J., Monnelly, K., Stokes, C., Wilson, S. … Rossiter, C. (2019). Integrate CommuniCATE. RCSLT Bulletin, (April 2019), pp. 20–21.
  6. Marshall, J., Caute, A., Chadd, K., Cruice, M., Monnelly, K., Wilson, S. … Woolf, C. (2019). Technology-enhanced writing therapy for people with aphasia: results of a quasi-randomized waitlist controlled study. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 54(2), pp. 203–220. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12391.
  7. O’Halloran, R., Douglas, J., Cruice, M., Davidson, B., McKinley, K. and Bigby, C. (2019). Representation and reporting of communicatively vulnerable patients in patient experience research. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. doi:10.1080/17549507.2019.1567815.
  8. Wallace, S.J., Worrall, L., Rose, T., Le Dorze, G., Breitenstein, C., Hilari, K. … Webster, J. (2019). A core outcome set for aphasia treatment research: The ROMA consensus statement. International Journal of Stroke, 14(2), pp. 180–185. doi:10.1177/1747493018806200.
  9. Behn, N., Marshall, J., Togher, L. and Cruice, M. (2019). Participants’ perspectives of feasibility of a novel group treatment for people with cognitive communication difficulties following acquired brain injury. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2019.1618929.
  10. Behn, N., Marshall, J., Togher, L. and Cruice, M. (2019). Setting and achieving individualized social communication goals for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) within a group treatment. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12488.
  11. Paynter, C., Cruice, M., Mathers, S., Gregory, H. and Vogel, A.P. (2019). Communication and cognitive impairments and health care decision making in MND: A narrative review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. doi:10.1111/jep.13219.
  12. Behn, N., Marshall, J., Togher, L. and Cruice, M. (2019). Reporting on novel complex intervention development for adults with social communication impairments after acquired brain injury. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2019.1642964.
  13. Barnard, R., Jones, J. and Cruice, M. (2018). Communication between therapists and nurses working in inpatient interprofessional teams: systematic review and meta-ethnography. Disability and Rehabilitation pp. 1–11. doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1526335.
  14. Cruice, M., Blom Johansson, M., Isaksen, J. and Horton, S. (2018). Reporting interventions in communication partner training: a critical review and narrative synthesis of the literature. Aphasiology, 32(10), pp. 1234–1265. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1482406.
  15. Dipper, L., Pritchard, M., Walkden, E. and Cruice, M. (2018). How do speakers with and without aphasia use syntax and semantics across two discourse genres? Aphasiology, 32(6), pp. 720–738. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1447642.
  16. Knight, R.A., Dipper, L. and Cruice, M. (2018). Viva survivors–the effect of peer-mentoring on pre-viva anxiety in early-years students. Studies in Higher Education, 43(1), pp. 190–199. doi:10.1080/03075079.2016.1161018.
  17. Huck, A., Thompson, R.L., Cruice, M. and Marshall, J. (2017). Effects of word frequency and contextual predictability on sentence reading in aphasia: an eye movement analysis. Aphasiology, 31(11), pp. 1307–1332. doi:10.1080/02687038.2017.1278741.
  18. Huck, A., Thompson, R.L., Cruice, M. and Marshall, J. (2017). The influence of sense-contingent argument structure frequencies on ambiguity resolution in aphasia. Neuropsychologia, 100, pp. 171–194. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.03.031.
  19. Sirman, N., Beeke, S. and Cruice, M. (2017). Professionals’ perspectives on delivering conversation therapy in clinical practice. Aphasiology, 31(4), pp. 465–494. doi:10.1080/02687038.2017.1278739.
  20. Pearl, G. and Cruice, M. (2017). Facilitating the Involvement of People with Aphasia in Stroke Research by Developing Communicatively Accessible Research Resources. Topics in Language Disorders, 37(1), pp. 67–84. doi:10.1097/TLD.0000000000000112.
  21. Aujla, S., Botting, N., Worrall, L., Hickson, L. and Cruice, M. (2016). Preliminary psychometric analyses of two assessment measures quantifying communicative and social activities: the COMACT and SOCACT. Aphasiology, 30(8), pp. 898–921. doi:10.1080/02687038.2015.1074655.
  22. Wallace, S.J., Worrall, L., Rose, T., Le Dorze, G., Cruice, M., Isaksen, J. … Gauvreau, C.A. (2016). Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF. Disability and rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2016.1194899.
  23. Cruice, M., Morton, R. and Davidson, B. (2016). An investigation of social activities of neurologically healthy older adults and relevance of the Social Activities Checklist (SOCACT-2). Journal of Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, 4.
  24. Caute, A., Cruice, M., Friede, A., Galliers, J., Dickinson, T., Green, R. … Woolf, C. (2016). Rekindling the love of books – a pilot project exploring whether e-readers help people to read again after a stroke. Aphasiology, 30(2-3), pp. 290–319. doi:10.1080/02687038.2015.1052729.
  25. Behn, N., Cruice, M., Marshall, J. and Togher, L. (2016). A feasibility study investigating the use of project-based treatment to improve communication skills and quality-of-life (QoL) in people with ABI. BRAIN INJURY, 30(5-6), pp. 550–550.
  26. Hilari, K., Cruice, M., Sorin-Peters, R. and Worrall, L. (2015). Quality of Life in Aphasia: State of the Art. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 114–118. doi:10.1159/000440997.
  27. Cruice, M., Isaksen, J., Randrup-Jensen, L., Viberg, M.E. and Kate, O.T. (2015). Practitioners' Perspectives on Quality of Life in Aphasia Rehabilitation in Denmark. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 131–144. doi:10.1159/000437384.
  28. Kindell, J., Sage, K. and Cruice, M. (2015). Supporting communication in semantic dementia: Clinical consensus from expert practitioners. Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 16(3), pp. 153–164. doi:10.1108/QAOA-08-2014-0016.
  29. Hinchliff, S. and Cruice, M. (2014). An evaluation of communication-related and quality of life outcomes for people with aphasia accessing Early Supported Discharge stroke services. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 9, pp. 38–38.
  30. Cruice, M., Pritchard, M. and Dipper, L. (2014). Verb use in aphasic and non-aphasic personal discourse: What is normal? Journal of Neurolinguistics, 28, pp. 31–47. doi:10.1016/j.jneuroling.2013.12.002.
  31. Patrício, B., Jesus, L.M.T., Cruice, M. and Hall, A. (2014). Quality of Life Predictors and Normative Data. Social Indicators Research, 119(3), pp. 1557–1570. doi:10.1007/s11205-013-0559-5.
  32. Matos, M.A.C., Jesus, L.M.T. and Cruice, M. (2014). Consequences of stroke and aphasia according to the ICF domains: Views of Portuguese people with aphasia, family members and professionals. Aphasiology, 28(7), pp. 771–796. doi:10.1080/02687038.2014.906561.
  33. Matos, M.A.C., Jesus, L.M.T. and Cruice, M. (2014). Assessment of aphasia in Portugal: Past, present and future. Stem-, Spraak- en Taalpathologie, 19(1), pp. 85–91.
  34. Knight, R.A., Dipper, L. and Cruice, M. (2013). The use of video in addressing anxiety prior to viva voce exams. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(6). doi:10.1111/bjet.12090.
  35. Caute, A., Pring, T., Cocks, N., Cruice, M., Best, W. and Marshall, J. (2013). Enhancing communication through gesture and naming therapy. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56(1), pp. 337–351. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0232).
  36. Cocks, N., Pritchard, M., Cornish, H., Johnson, N. and Cruice, M. (2013). A "novel" reading therapy programme for reading difficulties after a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Aphasiology, 27(5), pp. 509–531. doi:10.1080/02687038.2013.780283.
  37. Swinburn, K., McVicker, S. and Cruice, M. (2012). Measuring outcomes in community services: patient reported outcome measurement for people with aphasia. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE, 7, pp. 30–30.
  38. Marshall, J., Best, W., Cocks, N., Cruice, M., Pring, T., Bulcock, G. … Caute, A. (2012). Gesture and naming therapy for people with severe aphasia: A group study. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55(3), pp. 726–738. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0219).
  39. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2011). Reporting on psychological well-being of older adults with chronic aphasia in the context of unaffected peers. Disability and Rehabilitation, 33(3), pp. 219–228. doi:10.3109/09638288.2010.503835.
  40. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2010). Health-related quality of life in people with aphasia: Implications for fluency disorders quality of life research. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 35(3), pp. 173–189. doi:10.1016/j.jfludis.2010.05.008.
  41. Cocks, N. and Cruice, M. (2010). The experiences and perspectives of overseas trained speech and language therapists working in the United Kingdom. Int J Speech Lang Pathol, 12(3), pp. 271–282. doi:10.3109/17549500903215318.
  42. Hersh, D. and Cruice, M. (2010). Beginning to teach the end: the importance of including discharge from aphasia therapy in the curriculum. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 45(3), pp. 263–274. doi:10.3109/13682820902994200.
  43. Worrall, L., Brown, K., Cruice, M., Davidson, B., Hersh, D., Howe, T. … Sherratt, S. (2010). The evidence for a life-coaching approach to aphasia. Aphasiology, 24(4), pp. 497–514. doi:10.1080/02687030802698152.
  44. Barnard, R.A., Cruice, M.N. and Playford, E.D. (2010). Strategies Used in the Pursuit of Achievability during Goal Setting in Rehabilitation. Qualitative Health Research, 20(2), pp. 239–250. doi:10.1177/1049732309358327.
  45. Cruice, M., Cocks, N., Matthews, N., Barnett, L., Phillips, E., Middleton, R. … Gregoire-Clarke, J. (2010). Functional reading therapy for individuals with acquired
    reading difficulties: A preliminary investigation exploring its effectivenessÈ.
    ACQuiring Knowledge in Speech, Language and Hearing, 12(1), pp. 37–41.
  46. Cruice, M., Hill, R., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2010). Conceptualising quality of life for older people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 24(3), pp. 327–347. doi:10.1080/02687030802565849.
  47. Hersh, D. and Cruice, M. (2009). Beginning to teach the end: the importance of including discharge from aphasia therapy in the curriculum. Int J Lang Commun Disord p. 1. doi:10.1080/13682820902994200.
  48. Cruice, M. (2008). The contribution and impact of the international classification of functioning, disability and health on quality of life in communication disorders. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 10(1-2), pp. 38–49. doi:10.1080/17549500701790520.
  49. Cruice, M. (2007). Issues of access and inclusion with aphasia. Aphasiology, 21(1), pp. 3–8. doi:10.1080/02687030600798071.
  50. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2006). Quantifying aphasic people's social lives in the context of non-aphasic peers. Aphasiology, 20(12), pp. 1210–1225. doi:10.1080/02687030600790136.
  51. Cruice, M. (2006). Commentaries. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 13(7), p. 310.
  52. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2006). Perspectives of quality of life by people with aphasia and their family: suggestions for successful living. Top Stroke Rehabil, 13(1), pp. 14–24. doi:10.1310/4JW5-7VG8-G6X3-1QVJ.
  53. Cruice, M. (2006). Invited commentary by Brumfitt and Barton, 'Evaluating well-being in people with aphasia using speech therpay and clinical psychology. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 13(7), p. 310.
  54. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2005). Personal factors, communication and vision predict social participation in older adults. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 7(4), pp. 220–232. doi:10.1080/14417040500337088.
  55. Worrall, L. and Cruice, M. (2005). Why the WHO ICF and QOL constructs do not lend themselves to progmmatic appraisal for planning therapy for aphasia. A commentary on Ross and Wertz, "Advancing appraisal: Aphasia and the WHO". Aphasiology, 19(9), pp. 885–893. doi:10.1080/02687030544000038.
  56. Cruice, M., Worrall, L., Hickson, L. and Murison, R. (2005). Measuring quality of life: Comparing family members' and friends' ratings with those of their aphasic partners. Aphasiology, 19(2), pp. 111–129. doi:10.1080/02687030444000651.
  57. Cruice, M. (2005). Common issues but alternative solutions and innovations. A commentary on McAllister 'Issues and innovations in clinical education'. Advances in Speech-Language Pathology, 7(3), pp. 162–166.
  58. Cruice, M., Worrall, L., Hickson, L. and Murison, R. (2003). Finding a focus for quality of life with aphasia: Social and emotional health, and psychological well-being. Aphasiology, 17(4), pp. 333–353. doi:10.1080/02687030244000707.
  59. Cruice, M., Hirsch, F., Worrall, L., Holland, A. and Hickson, L. (2000). Quality of life for people with aphasia: Performance on and useability of quality of life assessments. Asia Pacific Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing, 5, pp. 85–91.
  60. Cruice, M., Worrall, L. and Hickson, L. (2000). Quality-of-life measurement in speech
    pathology and audiology.
    Asia Pacific Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing, 5, pp. 1–20.
  61. Cruice, M.N., Worrall, L.E. and Hickson, L.M.H. (2000). Boston Naming Test results for healthy older Australians: A longitudinal and cross-sectional study. Aphasiology, 14(2), pp. 143–155. doi:10.1080/026870300401522.
  62. Cruice, M. and Worrall, L. (2000). Book review: Visual Analogue Self-Esteem Scale. Aphasiology, 14(11), pp. 1153–1154.

Practitioner article

  1. The influence of sense-contingent argument structure frequencies on ambiguity resolution in aphasia. Neuropsychologia

Education

Teaching

Modules taught:

- Identity, Inclusion and Living with Disability and Deafness (HCM010)
- Acquired Language Impairment, within Language, Communication and Cognition Disabilities (SL3003, SLM009)
- Professional Studies (SL3008)
- Clinical Skills Programme (SL1006)
- Incidental lectures on communication in ageing (SLM005), disability in social context (SL1004), WHO ICF and communication disability (SL2005, SLM005), reading assessment and treatment (HCM001), and cognition and quality of life (HCM003).
- Research project modules (SL3007, SLM011, HCM018)

Other Activities

Events/conferences (17)

  1. Nordic Aphasia Conference 2017: Meaningful Outcomes. (Conference) Copenhagen, Denmark (2017).
    Paper: Meaningful Individualised Goal-setting within a Computer Training Course for Adults with Chronic Aphasia
    Author: Roper, A
    Co-authors: Lancashire, T.; Byrne, R.; Cruice, M.;
  2. The effect of a 'mock-viva' video on students' ratings of knowledge and anxiety. Newcastle, UK (2013).
    Description: R. Knight, L. Dipper, & M. Cruice, The 4th Colloquium of the British Association of Clinical Linguistics.
  3. A patient reported outcome measure for people with aphasia: Introduction and its use in the community. University of Exeter (2013).
    Description: K. Swinburn, S. McVicker, & M. Cruice, British Aphasiology Society Research Update Meeting.
  4. Practical ideas for involving patients with communication difficulties in goal setting (workshop). (2012).
    Description: Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cardiac and Stroke Network. See here for combined slides from the event: http://www.gmccsn.nhs.uk/cmsupload/091112Binder1.pdf
  5. Appreciating and using research to reflect on our practices in goal setting in rehabilitation. (2012).
    Description: Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cardiac and Stroke Network.. See here for combined slides from the event: http://www.gmccsn.nhs.uk/cmsupload/091112Binder1.pdf
  6. Quality of life predictors for Portuguese general population. Budapest, Hungary (2012).
    Description: Budapest, Hungary.. Patricio, B., Jesus, L.M., Cruice, M. & Hall, A.,19th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL).
  7. Limitations of the social relationships domain of WHOQOL-Bref. (2012).
    Description: Patricio, B., Jesus, L.M., Cruice, M.,& Hall, A., 19th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL). Poster Presentation.
  8. Investigating lexical diversity in verbs in contrasting discourse samples in aphasic and non-aphasic speakers. Melbourne, Australia (2012).
    Description: Cruice, M., Dipper, L., Pritchard, L., & Walkden, E. (2012), 15th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Poster presentation.
  9. Exploring change: Perspectives of individuals accessing and contributing to peer-led services. Melbourne, Australia (2012).
    Description: Cruice, M. & Swinburn, K. (2012), 15th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Poster presentation.
  10. Clinical guidelines for aphasia following stroke: Are they sufficient? Melbourne, Australia (2012).
    Description: Rohde, A., Worrall, L., Le Dorze, G., Hinckley, J., & Cruice, M. (2012), 15th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Poster presentation.
  11. Assessing quality of life in aphasia: The benefits and limitations of the WHOQOL-Bref in therapy planning for aphasia in Portugal. London, UK (2012).
    Description: Patricio, B., Jesus, L.M., Cruice, M., & Hall, A. (2012). Paper presented at British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium.
  12. Practical implications of the use of assessment tools. London, UK (2012).
    Description: Matos, A., Jesus, L., M., Cruice, M., & Gomes, A., British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium. Poster presentation.
  13. What is the impact of work on the quality of life of people with communication impairment? Preliminary findings from a wider research study. London, UK (2012).
    Description: Rutter, J. & Cruice, M., British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium. Poster presentation.
  14. Reading for pleasure: A single-case study from the Reading Clinic at City University London. (2012).
    Description: Seminar at The University of Sheffield
  15. Linguistic analysis of quality of life responses reveals lexical diversity in verbs with aphasia. Reading, UK (2011).
    Description: Cruice, M., Dipper, L., & Pritchard, M. (2011). Paper presented at the BAS Biennial International Conference.
  16. Developing students' skills and confidence in interacting with people with aphasia. Reading, UK (2011).
    Description: Cruice, M. & Farrington-Douglas, C., BAS Biennial International Conference. Poster presentation.
  17. Evidence for a criterion-referenced assessment of communication skills for speech and language therapy students. Prato, Italy (2011).
    Description: Cruice, M. & Farrington-Douglas, C., 4th International Clinical Skills Conference. Poster presentation.

Keynote lectures/speeches (7)

  1. Evidence and expertise in discourse-oriented aphasia rehabilitation: LUNA findings and future. Norwich (2019). British Aphasiology Society Clinical Symposium
  2. Making a meaningful difference in aphasia rehabilitation. London (2017). 17th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference
  3. Making a difference in meaningful discourse through LUNA – a novel therapy programme targeting personal narratives in aphasia. Copenhagen (2017). Nordic Aphasia Conference
  4. The impact of aphasia on psychological wellbeing: Evidence, perspectives and measurement. Harrogate (2014). Invited speaker: 9th UK Stroke Forum Conference
  5. Measuring and improving quality of life with aphasia after stroke: Philosophical, conceptual and practical approaches. Copenhagen (2009). 2nd Nordic Aphasia Conference
  6. Quality of life in aphasia: A history of the past, the realities and practicalities of the present, and vision for the future. Ljubljana (2008). 13th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference
  7. Social Approaches to Aphasia Think Tank, The Aphasia Institute. Toronto (2007). Invited think tank participant