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Contact Information

Contact

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Overview

Jane joined City University London in 1990 and is a member of the Divisional of Language and Communication Science. She is a Speech and Language Therapist and her specialism is aphasia (language disorder following stroke and other forms of brain injury). Before coming to City she worked in the Aphasia Unit of Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup.

Jane Marshall qualified as a speech and language therapist in 1987. She worked in the aphasia unit of an acute hospital for three years before undertaking a PhD exploring sentence processing impairments in aphasia. Her post doctoral research has investigated numerous aspects of aphasia with a strong emphasis on the clinical needs of people with aphasia and their remediation. Much of her current research is investigating technological applications in aphasia therapy. Jane teaches on all the Speech and Language Therapy and Speech and Language Sciences programmes within the School. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Aphasiology. In 2007 she won the Robin Tavistock Award for her work in Aphasia, and in 2009 was made a Fellow of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Qualifications

- BA (English Literature), Cambridge University
- Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Communication Studies, City University London
- PhD (Sentence Processing in Aphasia), City University London

Professional Bodies

- Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists
- Health and Care Professions Council

Administrative roles

- Programme Director of the MSc in Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Speech Language and Communication)

Awards

- The Robin Tavistock Award (2007)
- Fellowship of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (2009)

Research

Research Areas

Aphasia: investigation and therapy

Research Overview

Jane's research has explored several aspects of aphasia including sentence processing, jargon aphasia, proper name impairments, the use of writing, drawing and gesture in therapy, aphasia in users of British Sign Language and aphasia in bilingual language users.  All her work has placed a strong emphasis on the clinical needs of people with aphasia and their remediation. Her current research is investigating technological applications in aphasia therapy.  Two projects are exploring the remote delivery of aphasia therapy, using internet video conferencing technologies, and one is developing and evaluating a virtual communication environment for people with aphasia.

Grants

- 2006 - 2009 Enhancing communication in aphasia through gesture, with Tim Pring, Madeline Cruice, Naomi Cocks, Julie Hickin and Wendy Best. The Stroke Association.

- 2010 - 2013 Overcoming obstacles to the early identification of dementia in the signing Deaf community with colleagues at Manchester University: Alys Young (PI), John Keady, Katherine Rogers, Alistair Burns and UCL: Bencie Woll, Jo Atkinson. The Alzheimer's Society.

- 2010 -2012 Gesture Recognition in Aphasia Therapy. With Stephanie Wilson, Julia Galliers, Tim Pring and Naomi Cocks. Research Councils UK Digital Economy Programme (EPSRC).

- 2012-13 A Pilot Investigation of Aphasia Therapy Delivered via Internet Video Conferencing Technology; with Anna Caute, Celia Woolf, Stephanie Wilson, Shashi Hirani; Bupa Foundation, Phillip Pool Wilson Seed Corn Fund.

- 2012 - 13    Remote Aphasia Therapy: A Feasibility Study; with Celia Woolf, Stephanie Wilson, Shashi Hirani.  Tavistock Trust for Aphasia and Charles Wolfson Charitable Trust

- 2012 - 2014 Evaluating the effects of a virtual communication environment for people with aphasia; with Celia Woolf, Stephanie Wilson and Naomi Cocks. The Stroke Association

Collaborators

Internal research collaborators:

Anna Caute
Shula Chiat
Madeline Cruice
Lucy Dipper
Julia Galliers
Katerina Hilari
Shashi Hirani
Tim Pring
Stephanie Wilson
Celia Woolf


External research collaborators:

Jo Atkinson (UCL)
Wendy Best (UCL)
Naomi Cocks (Curtin University, Australia)
Julie Hickin (CQ University, Australia)
Bencie Woll (UCL)
Alys Young (Manchester University)
John Keady (Manchester University)
Katherine Rogers (Manchester University)
Alistair Burns (Manchester University)

Research assistants

Anna Caute
Niamh Devane
Tracey Booth

Research Students

Name
Nick Behn
Thesis Title
Communication and quality of life outcomes in people with acquired brain injury (ABI) following project-based treatment
Further Information
This project will evaluate a novel intervention with 24 people who have acquired brain injury. It will examine impacts on both communication and quality of life.
Name
Line Huck
Thesis Title
An eye tracking study of sentence reading in aphasia
Further Information
This is exploring the feasibility of eye tracking experiments in aphasia and whether eye reading movements reflect semantic and lexical features of the stimuli.
Name
Judith Kistner
Thesis Title
The use of co-speech gestures in aphasic conversation
Further Information
This is exploring the degree to which people with aphasia gesture while they talk and the role played by their gestures.
Name
Abi Roper
Thesis Title
Computer delivery of gesture therapy for people with aphasia
Further Information
This project will investigate the benefits of a new computer therapy tool (GeST) with 30 people who have severe aphasia.  It will examine whether practice with the tool improves gesturing skills and whether there is generalisation to interactive communication.

Publications

Books (2)

  1. Chiat, S., Law, J. and Marshall, J. (Eds.), (1997). Language Disorders in Children and Adults. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
  2. Marshall, J., Black, M. and Byng, S. Working with sentences: A Handbook for Aphasia Therapists. Bichester: Winslow Press.

Chapters (16)

  1. Marshall, J. (2016). Therapy for people with jargon aphasia. In Coppens, P. and Patterson, J. (Eds.), Aphasia Rehabilitation: Clinical Challenges Burlington MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning.
  2. Montagu, A. and Marshall, J. (2013). “What’s in a name?” improving proper name retrieval through therapy. The Aphasia Therapy File: Volume 2 (pp. 101–116). ISBN 978-0-203-49083-9.
  3. Marshall, J. (2012). Disorders of sentence processing in aphasia. In Papathanasio, I., Coppens, P. and Potagas, C. (Eds.), Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders (pp. 197–216). Burlington MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning. ISBN 978-0-7637-7100-3.
  4. Marshall, J. (2010). Treatment of spoken language disorders. The Handbook of Clinical Neuropsychology ISBN 978-0-19-159425-0.
  5. Marshall, J., Hilari, K., Cruice, M. and Harrison, K. (2010). Communication. In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing (pp. 184–204). Wiley-Blackwell.
  6. Marshall, J., Hilari, K. and Cruice, C. (2010). Communication. In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-4051-6104-6.
  7. Marshall, J., Hilari, K. and Cruice, M. (2010). Communication. Acute Stroke Nursing (pp. 184–204). ISBN 978-1-4051-6104-6.
  8. Marshall, J. (2008). Aphasia Therapy and Cognitive Nueropsychology: A Promise still to be fulfilled. In Joffe, V., Cruice, M. and Chiat, S. (Eds.), Language disorders in children and adults Wiley. ISBN 978-0-470-51839-7.
  9. Marshall, J. Can speech and language therapy with aphasic people affect activity and participation levels? A review of the literature. In Halligan, P.W. and Wade, D.T. (Eds.), The effectiveness of rehabilitation for cognitive deficits. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  10. Marshall, J., Atkinson, J., Thacker, A. and Woll, B. Stroke in Users of BSL: Investigating Sign Language Impairments. In Austin, S. and Crocker, S. (Eds.), Deafness in Mind: Working Psychologically with Deaf People London: Whurr.
  11. Marshall, J. The assessment and treatment of sentence processing disorders: a review of the literature. In Hillis, A. (Ed.), Handbook on Adult Language Disorders: Integrating Cognitive Neuropsychology, Neurology and Rehabilitation New York: Psychology Press.
  12. Marshall, J. Treatment of Speech and Language Disorders following Stroke. In Fawcus, R. and Fawcus, M. (Eds.), Collaboration in Stroke Care Blackwell.
  13. Marshall, J. Speech and Language Problems following Stroke. In Fawcus, R. and Fawcus, M. (Eds.), Collaboration in Stroke Care Blackwell.
  14. Marshall, J. ‘Who ends up with the fiver’ – a sentence production therapy. In Byng, C., Swinburn, K. and Pound, C. (Eds.), The aphasia Therapy File Hove: Psychology Press.
  15. Marshall, J. Doing something about a verb impairment: Two therapy approaches. In Byng, S., Swinburn, K. and Pound, C. (Eds.), The Aphasia Therapy File Hove: Psychology Press.
  16. Marshall, J., Hilari, K., Cruice, M. and Harrison, K. Acute Stroke Nursing (second edition). In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing Wiley-Blackwell.

Conference Papers and Proceedings (14)

  1. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2015). Semantisch reiche Gesten und ihre Funktion im Gespräch. 15. Aphasietagung der GAB 5-7 November, Innsbruck.
  2. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2015). The role of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. Science of Aphasia 17 Sep 2015 – 24 Nov 2015, Aveiro.
  3. (2015). The role of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. BAS Conference 9-11 September, London.
  4. marshall, J. and wilson, S. (2015). Computer Gesture Therapy for People with Severe Aphasia: Effects on tests of spoken naming. British Aphasiology Society Conference 9-11 September, London, UK.
  5. Roper, A.H., Marshall, J. and Wilson, S. (2015). Computer Gesture Therapy for People with Severe Aphasia: Effects on tests of spoken naming. British Aphasiology Society Conference September, London, UK.
  6. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2014). Die Funktion semantisch reicher Gesten im Gespraech bei Aphasie. 14. Aphasietagung der GAB 6-8 November, Freiburg, Germany.
  7. Kistner, J., Marshall, J. and Dipper, L.T. (2014). The use of semantically rich gestures in aphasic conversation. International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 18-20 June, The Hague, The Netherlands.
  8. Roper, A.H., marshall, J. and wilson, S. (2014). Revealing the Effects of Computer Gesture Therapy for Users with Severe
    Aphasia.
    British Aphasiology Society Research Update Meeting April, Exeter, UK.
  9. Roper, A., Marshall, J. and Wilson, S. (2014). Assessing technology use in aphasia. .
  10. Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Roper, A., Cocks, N., Marshall, J. and Pring, T. (2012). Words are not enough: Empowering people with aphasia in the design process. Participatory Design Conference 2012 .
  11. Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Muscroft, S., Marshall, J., Roper, A., Cocks, N. and Pring, T. (2011). Accessibility of 3D Game Environments for People with Aphasia: An Exploratory Study. 13th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility 24-26 October, Dundee, Scotland.
  12. Woll, B., Marshall, J., Atkinson, J. and Thacker, A. (2005). Aphasia in a bilingual user of BSL and English: Effects of cross linguistic cues. .
  13. Marshall, J. and Cairns, D. (2005). Therapy for sentence processing problems in aphasia: Working on thinking for speaking. .
  14. Marshall, J. (2003). Noun-verb dissociations-evidence from acquisition and developmental and acquired impairments. .

Journal Articles (72)

  1. Huck, A., Thompson, R.L., Cruice, M. and Marshall, J. (2017). Effects of word frequency and contextual predictability on sentence reading in aphasia: an eye movement analysis. Aphasiology, 31(11), pp. 1307–1332. doi:10.1080/02687038.2017.1278741.
  2. Huck, A., Thompson, R.L., Cruice, M. and Marshall, J. (2017). The influence of sense-contingent argument structure frequencies on ambiguity resolution in aphasia. Neuropsychologia, 100, pp. 171–194. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.03.031.
  3. Denmark, T., Marshall, J., Mummery, C., Roy, P., Woll, B. and Atkinson, J. (2016). Detecting Memory Impairment in Deaf People: A New Test of Verbal Learning and Memory in British Sign Language. ARCHIVES OF CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 31(8), pp. 855–867. doi:10.1093/arclin/acw032.
  4. Roper, A., Marshall, J. and Wilson, S. (2016). Benefits and Limitations of Computer Gesture Therapy for the Rehabilitation of Severe Aphasia. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 10 . doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00595.
  5. Marshall, J., Booth, T., Devane, N., Galliers, J., Greenwood, H., Hilari, K., Talbot, R., Wilson, S. and Woolf, C. (2016). Evaluating the benefits of aphasia intervention delivered in virtual reality: Results of a quasi-randomised study. PLoS ONE, 11(8) . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0160381.
  6. Northcott, S., Marshall, J. and Hilari, K. (2016). What factors predict who will have a strong social network following a stroke? Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research . doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0201.
  7. Woolf, C., Caute, A., Haigh, Z., Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Kessie, A., Hirani, S., Hegarty, B. and Marshall, J. (2016). A comparison of remote therapy, face to face therapy and an attention control intervention for people with aphasia: A quasi-randomised controlled feasibility study. Clinical Rehabilitation, 30(4), pp. 359–373. doi:10.1177/0269215515582074.
  8. Behn, N., Cruice, M., Marshall, J. and Togher, L. (2016). A feasibility study investigating the use of project-based treatment to improve communication skills and quality-of-life (QoL) in people with ABI. BRAIN INJURY, 30(5-6), pp. 550–550.
  9. Atkinson, J., Denmark, T., Marshall, J., Mummery, C. and Woll, B. (2015). Detecting Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Deaf People: The British Sign Language Cognitive Screening Test. ARCHIVES OF CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 30(7), pp. 694–711. doi:10.1093/arclin/acv042.
  10. Wilson, S., Roper, A., Marshall, J., Galliers, J., Devane, N., Booth, T. and Woolf, C. (2015). Codesign for people with aphasia through tangible design languages. CoDesign, 11(1), pp. 21–34. doi:10.1080/15710882.2014.997744.
  11. Woolf, C., Panton, A., Rosen, S., Best, W. and Marshall, J. (2014). Therapy for Auditory Processing Impairment in Aphasia: An evaluation of two approaches. Aphasiology, 28(12), pp. 1481–1505. doi:10.1080/02687038.2014.931921.
  12. Marshall, J., Roper, A., Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Cocks, N., Muscroft, S. and Pring, T. (2013). Computer delivery of gesture therapy for people with severe aphasia. Aphasiology, 27(9), pp. 1128–1146. doi:10.1080/02687038.2013.786803.
  13. Caute, A., Pring, T., Cocks, N., Cruice, M., Best, W. and Marshall, J. (2013). Enhancing communication through gesture and naming therapy. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56(1), pp. 337–351. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0232).
  14. Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Roper, A., Cocks, N., Marshall, J., Muscroft, S. and Pring, T. (2012). Words are not enough: Empowering people with aphasia in the design process. ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 1, pp. 51–60. doi:10.1145/2347635.2347643.
  15. Marshall, J., Best, W., Cocks, N., Cruice, M., Pring, T., Bulcock, G., Creek, G., Eales, N., Mummery, A.L., Matthews, N. and Caute, A. (2012). Gesture and naming therapy for people with severe aphasia: A group study. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 55(3), pp. 726–738. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0219).
  16. Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Muscroft, S., Marshall, J., Roper, A., Cocks, N. and Pring, T. (2011). Accessibility of 3D game environments for people with Aphasia: An exploratory study. ASSETS'11: Proceedings of the 13th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility pp. 139–146. doi:10.1145/2049536.2049562.
  17. Croft, S., Marshall, J., Pring, T. and Hardwick, M. (2011). Therapy for naming difficulties in bilingual aphasia: which language benefits? Int J Lang Commun Disord, 46(1), pp. 48–62. doi:10.3109/13682822.2010.484845.
  18. Eaton, E., Marshall, J. and Pring, T. (2011). Mechanisms of change in the evolution of jargon aphasia. Aphasiology, 25(12), pp. 1543–1561.
  19. Eaton, E., Marshall, J. and Pring, T. (2010). "Like déjà vu all over again": Patterns of perseveration in two people with jargon aphasia. Aphasiology, 24(9), pp. 1017–1031. doi:10.1080/02687030903249343.
  20. Hilari, K., Northcott, S., Roy, P., Marshall, J., Wiggins, R.D., Chataway, J. and Ames, D. (2010). Psychological distress after stroke and aphasia: the first six months. Clin Rehabil, 24(2), pp. 181–190. doi:10.1177/0269215509346090.
  21. Marshall, J. (2010). Classification of aphasia: Are there benefits for practice? APHASIOLOGY, 24(3), pp. 408–412. doi:10.1080/02687030802553688.
  22. Eaton, E., Marshall, J. and Pring, T. (2010). oLike deja vu all over againo: Patterns of perseveration in two people with jargon aphasia. APHASIOLOGY, 24(9), pp. 1017–1031. doi:10.1080/02687030903249343.
  23. Hilari, K., Northcott, S., Roy, P., Marshall, J. and Wiggins, R.D. (2010). Psychological Distress after Stroke and Aphasia: The first six months. Clinical Rehabilitation, 24, pp. 181–190.
  24. Tyrone, M.E., Atkinson, J.R., Marshall, J. and Woll, B. (2009). The effects of cerebellar ataxia on sign language production: A case study. Neurocase, 15(5), pp. 419–426. doi:10.1080/13554790902893097.
  25. Hilari, K., Lamping, D.L., Smith, S.C., Northcott, S., Lamb, A. and Marshall, J. (2009). Psychometric properties of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) in a generic stroke population. Clin Rehabil, 23(6), pp. 544–557. doi:10.1177/0269215508101729.
  26. Marshall, J. (2009). Framing ideas in aphasia: the need for thinking therapy. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 44(1), pp. 1–14. doi:10.1080/13682820802683507.
  27. Flynn, L., Cumberland, A. and Marshall, J. (2009). Public knowledge about aphasia: A survey with comparative data. APHASIOLOGY, 23(3), pp. 393–401. doi:10.1080/02687030701828942.
  28. Tyrone, M., Atkinson, J., Marshall, J. and Woll, B. (2009). The Effects of Cerebellar Ataxia on Sign LAnguage Production: A Case Study. Neurocase, 15(5), pp. 419–426.
  29. Marshall, J. (2008). Afterword. Language Disorders in Children and Adults: Psycholinguistic Approaches to Therapy pp. 130–134. doi:10.1002/9780470699157.ch8.
  30. Marshall, J. (2008). Afterword. Language Disorders in Children and Adults: Psycholinguistic Approaches to Therapy pp. 183–184. doi:10.1002/9780470699157.ch12.
  31. Chiat, S., Law, J. and Marshall, J. (2008). Language Disorders in Children and Adults: Psycholinguistic Approaches to Therapy. Language Disorders in Children and Adults: Psycholinguistic Approaches to Therapy pp. 1–272. doi:10.1002/9780470699157.
  32. Marshall, J. (2008). Psycholinguistic Applications to Language Therapy. pp. 250–254. doi:10.1002/9780470699157.ch18.
  33. Panton, A. and Marshall, J. (2008). Improving spelling and everyday writing after a CVA: A single-case therapy study. APHASIOLOGY, 22(2), pp. 164–183. doi:10.1080/02687030701262605.
  34. Cairns, D., Marshall, J., Cairns, P. and Dipper, L. (2007). Event processing through naming: Investigating event focus in two people with aphasia. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22(2), pp. 201–233. doi:10.1080/01690960500489644.
  35. Cairns, D., Marshall, J., Cairns, P. and Dipper, L.T. (2007). Event Processing through naming: Investigating eveny focus in two people with aphasia. Language and Cognitive Processes, 22(2), pp. 201–233. doi:10.1080/01690960500489644.
  36. Marshall, J. (2006). Jargon aphasia: What have we learned? APHASIOLOGY, 20(5), pp. 387–410. doi:10.1080/02687030500489946.
  37. Croft, S., Marshall, J. and Pring, T. (2006). Assessing noun naming impairments in bilingual aphasia. BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, 99(1-2), pp. 21–22. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2006.06.021.
  38. Marshall, J. (2006). The roles of gesture in aphasia therapy. Advances in Speech-Language Pathology, 8, pp. 110–124.
  39. Marshall, J., Atkinson, J., Woll, B. and Thacker, A. (2005). Aphasia in a bilingual user of British sign language and English: Effects of cross-linguistic cues. COGNITIVE NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 22(6), pp. 719–736. doi:10.1080/02643290442000266.
  40. Atkinson, J., Marshall, J., Woll, B. and Thacker, A. (2005). Testing comprehension abilities in users of British sign language following CVA. BRAIN AND LANGUAGE, 94(2), pp. 233–248. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2004.12.008.
  41. Marshall, J. and Cairns, D. (2005). The Verb and Sentence Test (VAST). INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 40(2), pp. 237–238. doi:10.1080/13682820400006010.
  42. Robson, J., Marshall, J., Pring, T., Montagu, A. and Chiat, S. (2004). Processing proper nouns in aphasia: Evidence from assessment and therapy. Aphasiology, 18(10), pp. 917–935. doi:10.1080/02687030444000462.
  43. Marshall, J., Atkinson, J., Smulovitch, E., Thacker, A. and Woll, B. (2004). Aphasia in a user of British Sign Language: Dissociation between sign and gesture. COGNITIVE NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 21(5), pp. 537–554. doi:10.1080/02643290342000249.
  44. Atkinson, J., Campbell, R., Marshall, J., Thacker, A. and Woll, B. (2004). Understanding 'not': neuropsychological dissociations between hand and head markers of negation in BSL. NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA, 42(2), pp. 214–229. doi:10.1016/S0028-3932(03)00186-6.
  45. Robson, J., Pring, T., Marshall, J. and Chiat, S. (2003). Phoneme frequency effects in jargon aphasia: a phonological investigation of nonword errors. Brain Lang, 85(1), pp. 109–124.
  46. Marshall, J., Atkinson, J., Thacker, A. and Woll, B. (2003). Is speech and language therapy meeting the needs of language minorities? The case of Deaf people with neurological impairments. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 38(1), pp. 85–94. doi:10.1080/1368282021000011023.
  47. Rayner, H. and Marshall, J. (2003). Training volunteers as conversation partners for people with aphasia. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 38(2), pp. 149–164. doi:10.1080/1368282021000060308.
  48. Robson, J., Marshall, J., Chiat, S. and Pring, T. (2001). Enhancing communication in jargon aphasia: a small group study of writing therapy. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 36(4), pp. 471–488.
  49. Marshall, J., Pring, T., Chiat, S. and Robson, J. (2001). When ottoman is easier than chair: an inverse frequency effect in jargon aphasia. Cortex, 37(1), pp. 33–53.
  50. Maneta, A., Marshall, J. and Lindsay, J. (2001). Direct and indirect therapy for word sound deafness. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 36(1), pp. 91–106.
  51. Sacchett, C., Byng, S., Marshall, J. and Pounds, C. (1999). Drawing together: evaluation of a therapy programme for severe aphasia. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 34(3), pp. 265–289. doi:10.1080/136828299247414.
  52. Robson, J., Marshall, J., Pring, T. and Chiat, S. (1998). Phonological naming therapy in jargon aphasia: positive but paradoxical effects. J Int Neuropsychol Soc, 4(6), pp. 675–686.
  53. Marshall, J., Pring, T., Robson, J. and Chiat, S. (1998). When ottoman is easier than chair: An inverse frequency effect in jargon aphasia? Brain and Language, 65(1), pp. 78–81.
  54. Robson, J., Pring, T., Marshall, J., Morrison, S. and Chiat, S. (1998). Written communication in undifferentiated jargon aphasia: a therapy study. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 33(3), pp. 305–328.
  55. Marshall, J., Pring, T. and Chiat, S. (1998). Verb retrieval and sentence production in aphasia. Brain Lang, 63(2), pp. 159–183. doi:10.1006/brln.1998.1949.
  56. Marshall, J., Robson, J., Pring, T. and Chiat, S. (1998). Why does monitoring fail in jargon aphasia? comprehension, judgment, and therapy evidence. Brain Lang, 63(1), pp. 79–107. doi:10.1006/brln.1997.1936.
  57. Marshall, J., Chiat, S. and Pring, T. (1997). An impairment in processing verbs' thematic roles: A therapy study. Aphasiology, 11(9), pp. 855–876.
  58. Marshall, J. and Pound, C. (1997). Difficulties with discourse. APHASIOLOGY, 11(6), pp. 625–629. doi:10.1080/02687039708248496.
  59. Robson, J., Pring, T., Marshall, J. and Chiat, S. (1996). Failure to monitor speech in jargonaphasia: An impediment to therapy? Brain and Language, 55(1), pp. 32–34.
  60. Marshall, J., Robson, J., Pring, T. and Chiat, S. (1996). Semantic skills and weaknesses in a case of jargon aphasia. Brain and Language, 55(1), pp. 135–137.
  61. Marshall, J. (1996). The PALPA: A commentary and consideration of the clinical implications. APHASIOLOGY, 10(2), pp. 197–202. doi:10.1080/02687039608248407.
  62. Marshall, J., Pring, T., Chiat, S. and Robson, J. (1996). Calling a salad a federation: An investigation of semantic jargon. Part 1 - Nouns. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 9(4), pp. 237–250. doi:10.1016/S0911-6044(97)82796-0.
  63. Marshall, J., Chiat, S., Robson, J. and Pring, T. (1996). Calling a salad a federation: An investigation of semantic jargon. Part 2 - Verbs. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 9(4), pp. 251–260. doi:10.1016/S0911-6044(97)82797-2.
  64. Marshall, J. and Sacchett, C. (1996). Does the VSS improve social outcome after stroke?: A reply to Geddes and Chamberlain. Clinical Rehabilitation, 10, pp. 104–111.
  65. MARSHALL, J. (1995). THE MAPPING HYPOTHESIS AND APHASIA THERAPY. APHASIOLOGY, 9(6), pp. 517–539. doi:10.1080/02687039508248712.
  66. Marshall, J. (1995). Aphasia treatment: World perspectives - Holland,AL, Forbes,MM. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF DISORDERS OF COMMUNICATION, 30(4), pp. 495–496.
  67. Marshall, J., Pring, T. and Chiat, S. (1993). Sentence processing therapy: Working at the level of the event. Aphasiology, 7(2), pp. 177–199. doi:10.1080/02687039308249505.
  68. MACKENZIE, C., LEMAY, M., LENDREM, W., MCGUIRK, E., MARSHALL, J. and ROSSITER, D. (1993). A SURVEY OF APHASIA SERVICES IN THE UNITED-KINGDOM. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF DISORDERS OF COMMUNICATION, 28(1), pp. 43–61.
  69. SACCHETT, C. and MARSHALL, J. (1992). FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF COMMUNICATION - IMPLICATIONS FOR THE REHABILITATION OF APHASIC PEOPLE - REPLY. APHASIOLOGY, 6(1), pp. 95–100. doi:10.1080/02687039208248579.
  70. Pring, T., White-Thomson, M., Pound, C., Marshall, J. and Davis, A. (1990). Short Report Picture/word matching tasks and word retrieval: Some follow-up data and second thoughts. Aphasiology, 4(5), pp. 479–483. doi:10.1080/02687039008248788.
  71. Marshall, J. (1990). The Use of Picture/Word Matching Tasks to Assist Word Retrieval in Aphasic Patients. Aphasiology, 4(2), pp. 167–184. doi:10.1080/02687039008249068.
  72. Galliers, J., Wilson, S., Marshall, J., Talbot, R., Devane, N., Booth, T., Woolf, C. and Greenwood, H. Experiencing EVA Park, A Multi-User Virtual World For People With Aphasia. ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing .

Practitioner Article

  1. The influence of sense-contingent argument structure frequencies on ambiguity resolution in aphasia. Neuropsychologia

Education

Educational Leadership

Programme Director of the MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care – Speech, Language and Communication.

Teaching

I teach on the following undergraduate modules:

SL3002 Language Sciences
SL3006 Normal and Disordered Word Processing
SL3007 Research and Evidence Based Practice.

I teach on the following postgraduate modules:

SLM008 Langauge Sciences
SLM010 Professional Studies
HCM001 Acquired Language Impairments
HCM003 Cognitive Communication Impairments.

Teaching Expertise

My teaching covers aphasia and other neurologically based langauge impairments, language processing, professional studies relating to speech and language therapy, research and evidence based practice.

Other Activities

Editorial Activity

  1. Member of the editorial board of the Journal Aphasiology.

Event/Conference

  1. Computer Tools in Aphasia Therapy. Dublin (2013).
    Description: Stroke Study Day

Keynote Lectures/Speeches (2)

  1. 15th International aphasia rehabilitation conference, Melbourne Australia. Keynote Address. Helping hands: the role of gesture in aphasia rehabilitation. (2012).
  2. Can People with Severe Aphasia Benefit from Computer-delivered Gesture Therapy? Sorbonne Nouvelle University, Paris, France (2016). International Society of Gesture Studies Conference in Paris
    ISGS 2016, July 18th-22nd 2016
    https://isgs7.sciencesconf.org/?lang=en

Find us

City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

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City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.