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City alumnus appointed head of the BBC's News and Current Affairs team

Former Times Editor James Harding to take charge of the world's largest broadcast news operation.
by Ben

The BBC has announced that James Harding, who studied on the Newspaper Journalism MA at City in 1995, has been appointed as Director of their News and Current Affairs team.

From 2007 until December last year Mr Harding was editor at The Times. Before that he held a number of international posts at the Financial Times.

Harding, who will sit on the BBC's Executive and Management Boards will oversee the BBC's News and Current Affairs programming. BBC News is the largest broadcast news operation in the world providing trusted news and analysis to audiences in the UK and internationally. The division employs over 8,000 staff working across Network News, English Regions and Global News.

Video: What's it like studying at one of the world's top Journalism schools? James Harding (Head of News, BBC), Nicole Young (CBS 60 Minutes) and Radhika Sanghani (Telegraph Graduate Scheme) talk about their experiences.

BBC Director-General Tony Hall said: "I am delighted that James will be joining as the new Director of BBC News and Current Affairs. High quality journalism sits right at the heart of the BBC making this is an absolutely critical role.

"James has a very impressive track record as a journalist, editor and manager. I believe he will give BBC News a renewed sense of purpose as it moves away from what has been an undeniably difficult chapter. As an organisation, the BBC will also benefit from his external perspective and experience which he will share as a member of the BBC's Executive team."

James Harding said: "The BBC's newsroom strives to be the best in the world, trusted for its accuracy, respected for its fairness and admired for the courage of its reporting. I am honoured to be a part of it."

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