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  1. Centre for Language and Communication Science Research
School of Health Sciences

Centre for Language and Communication Science Research

The Centre for Language and Communication Science Research carries out research into all aspects of speech, language and communication disorders, as well as typical speech and language.

Key themes include: the nature and long term consequences of developmental language impairment, language and disadvantage, and therapy both for developmental and acquired disorders. Deafness and sign language is another focus of interest, with investigations of typical and impaired sign language use.

About the centre

The Centre for Language and Communication Science Research (CLCSR) carries out research into all aspects of speech, language and communication disorders, as well as typical speech and language, social and clinical linguistics, deafness, dysphagia, and developmental disorders. Key themes include: aphasia, the nature and long term consequences of developmental language disorder, assessment and therapy both for developmental and acquired disorders; gesture, deafness and sign language as well as social and clinical linguistics.

The research is renowned for its combination of innovation, scientific excellence and clinical relevance. CLCSR is interdisciplinary by nature, including speech and language therapists, psychologists, linguists, phoneticians and audiologists. Our research has influenced clinical and educational practices both in the UK and overseas, and led to new clinical tools (e.g. for the early identification of developmental language and social communication disorders; for the assessment of quality of life and self-report outcomes in adults with aphasia), new clinical interventions (e.g., to improve vocabulary / word finding, discourse / narrative, working memory, reading and writing). The Centre has an on-site speech and language therapy clinic, and active collaborations with academic and clinical partners in the UK and internationally.

The Centre comprises about 30 members of academic staff and around 20 post-doctoral research fellows, research assistants and doctoral students. The Centre is organised into four active research groups.

The Centre comprises of four research groups:

  1. Adult Assessment and Intervention Research (AAIR)
  2. Developmental Assessment and Intervention Research (DAIR)
  3. Speech, Phonology and Linguistics
  4. Deafness and Visual Language Research

Since 2008, the Centre has been engaged in current and recent projects to the value of over £15M, stimulating a range of research outputs including over 200 peer-reviewed journal publications. We also have City Access, a resources page for families and professionals to access information and downloads relating to questionnaires and tools developed at CLCSR.

Please follow our Twitter feed: @CityLCS for regular news

People

Here is a list of the academic staff who work in the Centre for Language & Communication Science Research. You can find out more about each member of staff, including their latest publications and their contact details by following the links below.

Staff

PhD students

  • Rachel Barnard
  • Livia Bernardi
  • Morag Boyes
  • Helen Spicer-Cain
  • Gabriella Caminotto
  • Emma Christopher
  • Ruth Deutsch
  • Eva Efstratiadou
  • Rachel England
  • Julie Hickin
  • Ioanna Georgiadou
  • Valia Kladouchou
  • Billie Lowe
  • Naomi Miller
  • Abigail Moran
  • Ashwag Wallan

JaneMarshall

Professor Jane Marshall

Our research

Adult Assessment and Intervention Research (AAIR)

This group investigates the nature and treatment of adult acquired communication disorders, with a particular emphasis on aphasia. Themes in aphasia include: the investigation of aphasic language impairments, the impact of therapy, interventions to improve emotional and social wellbeing in people with aphasia, and assessment, outcome measurement and the self- reported experience of aphasia. In this last area, tools developed at City, e.g. the SAQOL-39g, have become an international gold standard and are recommended for use in all aphasia trials and intervention studies (see Core Outcome Set for Aphasia).

Current studies are exploring the use of technology in aphasia therapy and the impact of therapies on activities, participation and quality of life. For example, we are exploring the benefits of a virtual communication environment, EVA Park, for people with aphasia, and are evaluating therapies that make use of mainstream technologies, such as text to speech software. We are evaluating interventions aimed at improving wellbeing in people with aphasia, such as peer-befriending and Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Further work is developing a novel intervention for narrative discourse (LUNA). Many of AAIR’s aphasia projects are conducted in collaboration with City’s Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design. A current project with this Centre is developing tools that enable people with aphasia to create and curate digital content.

A Special Interest Group of AAIR focuses on head and neck cancer research.  Our work in this area has explored, among other things, the development and evaluation of outcome measures for this population and quality of life and swallowing outcomes after laryngectomy.  Past and present collaborators include the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists’ Head & Neck Clinical Excellence Network, the University College London Hospital and Barts Health NHS Trusts. Another Special Interest Group focuses on dysphagia research across the lifespan (see also DAIR).  With adults, the dysphagia group have a particular focus on Parkinson’s disease, and adults with learning disabilities.

The group has attracted research funding from national and international bodies including:  the Barts Charity, the Bupa Foundation, the Dunhill Medical Trust, the EPSRC, the EU, the NIHR, the Stroke Association, and the Tavistock Trust for Aphasia.

Staff

Students

  • Rachel Barnard
  • Eva Efstratiadou
  • Julie Hickin
  • Valia Kladouchou

Developmental Assessment and Intervention Research (DAIR)

This group explores the identification, impact and treatment of developmental language disorders (DLD), and the communication and related cognitive difficulties associated with other childhood developmental disorders (e.g. autism, intellectual disabilities). Early years studies have developed assessment and diagnostic tools and have used these to investigate how very early processing skills may affect language and social communication in school-age children (VEPS). Further themes of this group include the relationship between language and social wellbeing in children and young people, new interventions to improve vocabulary and language skills, dynamic assessments of language skills, predictors of language and literacy skills in adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and the role of registered intermediaries in assisting child witnesses with and without autism to give their best evidence (Access to justice).

Early years assessments developed by this group are appropriate for children from diverse backgrounds and are being used by paediatric NHS services (e.g. Lambeth and Southwark) and special early years provisions. Research from the group has generated novel insights into the long term consequences of developmental language disorders, e.g., by exploring impacts in adolescence and young adulthood. Promising new interventions to support language learning and vocabulary development in primary and secondary age children and young people have been developed and evaluated. Criminal justice professionals have benefited from understanding how registered intermediaries assist young children to give fuller accounts of witnessed events.

A Special Interest Group of DAIR focuses on dysphagia research.  The group investigates dysphagia across the lifespan and the rationale underpinning dysphagia interventions.  Projects have included funded research into neonatal feeding, paediatric gastrostomy tube feeding, parents’ perceptions of instrumental swallow assessments, supporting the eating and drinking of children with learning disabilities through use of mealtime mats and education staff training, and typical development of swallowing skills. These projects have been undertaken with a range of NHS Trusts (including the Royal Free NHS Trust and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust), and international speech and language therapy teams.

The DAIR group has attracted research funding from national and international bodies including: the Baily Thomas Charitable Trust, the Communication Trust, the Department for Education, the Department for International Development, the ESRC, the EU, the Heather Van der Lely Foundation, the Nuffield Foundation, the NIHR, the Redbridge, and Barking and Dagenham local authorities, the Swedish Research Council and the Waterloo Foundation.

Staff

PhD Students

  • Livia Bernardi
  • Morag Boyes
  • Helen Cain
  • Emma Christopher
  • Ruth Deutsch
  • Rachel England
  • Ioanna Georgiadou
  • Valia Kladouchou
  • Billie Lowe
  • Abigail Moran
  • Ashwag Wallan

Speech, Phonology and Linguistics

The research of this group generally focuses on the production and perception of typical and atypical speech and language.

From a phonetic perspective, this research group has carried out experimental studies on a wide range of topics such as the devoicing of English fricatives, the acoustic characteristics of vowels in typically developing children and children with hearing impairment, the analysis of asymmetries in tongue-palate contact in speech and the analysis of articulation errors in speakers with motor speech disorders (Speech Sound Disorders, Dysarthria, Foreign Accent Syndrome). Additionally, the group has world-class expertise in Forensic Phonetics and is actively involved in the analysis of speech for legal purposes. Furthermore, the group has made a strong research contribution to the pedagogical aspects of phonetics teaching and the application of phonetic transcription in Speech and Language Therapy.  Finally, the group has produced a series of in-depth phonetic descriptions of various languages (Standard Dutch, Hamont Dutch, Lusoga, Punjabi and Zulu) which have been published in the Journal of the International Phonetic Association as illustrations of the IPA.

From a linguistic perspective, a major research strand has been the use of linguistic analysis in clinical settings and the development of discourse treatment programmes for people with aphasia (LUNA) and for older adults living in residential settings (STARs). Another significant research strand has focused on language, identity and inclusion within professional contexts – a focus that has included analysis of gendered discourses in Speech and Language Therapy and the role they may play in maintaining a lack of diversity in this professional context. Finally, several publications have focused on the key principles and contributions of core research methodologies in linguistic research.

In an audiological perspective, several studies have been carried out on noise exposure levels from personal stereo players, the effects of background noise on speech perception and the assessment of deaf awareness among heathcare students.

This group is supported by a well-equipped phonetics and audiology lab. The phonetics lab has state-of-the-art instrumentation to analyse various aspects of speech production such as oral/nasal airflow and pressure (Pcquirer, Nasometer), vocal fold vibration (laryngography), tongue-palate contact in speech (Electropalatography), tongue configuration in articulation (Ultrasound). In addition the lab has a wide range of software packages to analyse the acoustic characteristics of speech. Audiological equipment consists of screening and clinical audiometers, tympanometers, an oto-acoustic emissions and auditory brainstem response screener and a range of hearing aids for mild-moderate and severe-profound hearing loss and several sound level meters (among others B&K type 2250). In addition there is a range of software applications to analyse aspects of hearing.

This group has attracted research funding from national and international bodies including: the Dunhill Medical Trust; the Flemish Science Foundation; the Leverhulme Trust; the Royal Flemish Society of Belgium for Sciences and the Arts; and the Stroke Association.

Staff

PhD Students

  • Roberta Iacovelli
  • Husen Owaida
  • Anne Zimmer-Stahl

Deafness and Visual Language Research

This group has pioneered research into the effects of deafness on all aspects of child development including language, cognitive development and literacy. The group has explored sign language development in deaf children and created the first standardised clinical assessments of language development in British Sign Language (BSL) which have since been adapted into 18 other sign languages internationally.

Other themes include theory of mind in deaf children, speechreading in deaf and hearing individuals, reading and dyslexia in deaf children, language impairments in signers, spoken language acquisition, and language and reading interventions. The group has a further interest in the impact of acquired language and cognitive impairments on sign language and published the first investigations of aphasia in users of BSL.

The group links with the Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre (DCAL) at UCL.

The group has attracted research funding from: the Alzheimer's Society; the ESRC; the Heather van der Lely Foundation; the Leverhulme Trust; and the Nuffield Foundation.

Staff

PhD students

  • Rachel England

Research Projects

Downloads and Resources

Please visit CityAccess for research tools.

Please visit individual staff pages or City Research Online for open access to our publications

ShulaChiat

Professor Shula Chiat

Grants

September 2017

Linguistic Underpinnings of Narrative in Aphasia (LUNA): A proof-of-concept study of a novel discourse treatment for aphasia using personal narratives 2: Dr Madeline Cruice and Dr Lucy Dipper - £205,257.

July 2017

Why are adolescents with intellectual disability poor readers? A comparison of person environment factors that predict reading in intellectual disability: Professor Lucy Henry - £19,000.

March 2017

Measuring asymmetry in the articulation of English speech Sounds: Dr Johan Verhoeven - £238,015.

2016

How do different neurodisability services meet the psychosocial support needs of children/young people with feeding disabilities and their families: a national survey and case study approach to mapping and costing service models, care pathways and the child and family experience. (NUHR GPATH). Craig G, Dr C Harding et al - £376,000.

October 2016

Delivering group support for people with aphasia through a virtual communication environment: Professor Jane Marshall - £158,111.

April 2016

Adapting a psychosocial intervention for people with post-stroke aphasia: a feasibility study: Dr Sarah Northcott - £174,936.

January 2016

Adjustment post stroke and aphasia: SUpporting wellbeing through PEeR Befriending (SUPERB): Professor Katerina Hilari - £490,664.

December 2015

International Network Grant: Trans-national perspectives on sign language learning: Professor Gary Morgan - £113,571.

October 2014

On Track - Reducing the number of children with reading difficulties: Dr Fiona Kyle - £7,255.00

Publications

Charpentier, A., Morgan, S. ORCID: 0000-0002-7573-4290 and Harding, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5192-2027 (2019). A service evaluation of parent adherence with dysphagia management therapy guidelines: Reports from family carers supporting children with complex needs in Greece. Disability and Rehabilitation, doi: 10.1080/09638288.2018.1499048

Rowe, A., Titterington, J., Holmes, J., Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 and Taggart, L. (2019). Interventions targeting working memory in 4-11 year olds within their everyday contexts: a systematic review. Developmental Review, 52, pp. 1-23. doi: 10.1016/j.dr.2019.02.001

Verhoeven, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-0738-8517, Miller, N. R., Daems, L. and Reyes-Aldasoro, C. C. ORCID: 0000-0002-9466-2018 (2019). Visualisation and Analysis of Speech Production with Electropalatography. Journal of Digital Imaging, 5(3), 40.. doi: 10.3390/jimaging5030040

Attenborough, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-4018-8445, Abbott, S., Brook, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-8867-0150 and Knight, R.-A. ORCID: 0000-0002-7804-7250 (2019). Everywhere and Nowhere: work-based learning in healthcare education. Nurse Education in Practice, doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2019.03.004

O'Halloran, R., Douglas, J., Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262, Davidson, B., McKinley, K. and Bigby, C. (2019). Representation and reporting of communicatively vulnerable patients in patient experience research. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, doi: 10.1080/17549507.2019.1567815

Herman, R. ORCID: 0000-0001-5732-9999, Kyle, F. E. ORCID: 0000-0003-2997-3167 and Roy, P. (2019). Literacy and phonological skills in oral deaf children and hearing children with a history of dyslexia. Reading Research Quarterly, doi: 10.1002/rrq.244

Efstratiadou, E. A., Papathanasiou, I., Holland, R., Varlokosta, S. and Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849 (2019). Efficacy of Elaborated Semantic Features Analysis in Aphasia: a quasi-randomised controlled trial. Aphasiology, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2019.1571558

O'Neill, H., Murphy, C-A. and Chiat, S. ORCID: 0000-0002-8981-8153 (2019). What Our Hands Tell Us: A Two-Year Follow-Up Investigating Outcomes in Subgroups of Children With Language Delay. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, doi: 10.1044/2018_jslhr-l-17-0261

Behn, N. ORCID: 0000-0001-9356-9957, Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X, Togher, L. and Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262 (2019). Feasibility and initial efficacy of project-based treatment for people with ABI. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12452

Poloczek, S., Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358, Messer, D. J. and Buettner, G. (2019). Do children use different forms of verbal rehearsal in serial picture recall tasks? A multi-method study. Memory, doi: 10.1080/09658211.2018.1563615

Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849, Behn, N., Marshall, J., Simpson, A., Thomas, S., Northcott, S., Flood, C. ORCID: 0000-0001-5170-7792, McVicker, S., Jofre-Bonet, M., Moss, B., James, K. and Goldsmith, K. (2019). Adjustment with aphasia after stroke: study protocol for a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial for SUpporting wellbeing through PEeR Befriending (SUPERB). Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 5, 14.. doi: 10.1186/s40814-019-0397-6

Marien, P., Keulen, S. and Verhoeven, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-0738-8517 (2019). Neurological aspects of foreign accent syndrome in stroke patients. Journal of Communication Disorders, 77, pp. 94-113. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2018.12.002

Neate, T., Bourazeri, K., Roper, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-6950-6294, Stumpf, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6482-1973 and Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X (2018). Co-Created Personas: Engaging and Empowering Users with Diverse Needs Within the Design Process. Paper presented at the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 4-9 May 2019, Glasgow, UK.

Neate, T., Roper, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-6950-6294, Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X and Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X (2018). Empowering Expression for Users with Aphasia through Constrained Creativity. Paper presented at the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 4-9 May 2019, Glasgow, UK.

Conti-Ramsden, G., Mok, P., Durkin, K., Pickles, A., Toseeb, U. and Botting, N. ORCID: 0000-0003-1082-9501 (2018). Do emotional difficulties and peer problems hew together from childhood to adolescence? The case of children with a history of developmental language disorder (DLD). European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: official journal of the European Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, doi: 10.1007/s00787-018-1261-6

Barnard, R. A., Jones, J. C. and Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262 (2018). Communication between therapists and nurses working in inpatient interprofessional teams: Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Disability and Rehabilitation, doi: 10.1080/09638288.2018.1526335

Northcott, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-8229-5452, Thomas, S., Simpson, A. ORCID: 0000-0003-3286-9846, Burns, K., Hirani, S. P. ORCID: 0000-0002-1577-8806, Moss, B. and Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849 (2018). How acceptable is solution focused brief therapy (SFBT) to people with severe aphasia?. International Journal of Stroke,

Murphy, R., Harrison, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-0271-5272 and Harding, C. (2018). Feeding infants on high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC): An exploration of speech-language pathologists’ decision-making processes. Journal of Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, 20(3), pp. 121-129.

Jones, A., Marshall, C., Botting, N. ORCID: 0000-0003-1082-9501, St Clair, M., Atkinson, J. and Morgan, G. ORCID: 0000-0002-9495-1274 (2018). Expressive vocabulary predicts non-verbal executive function: a 2-year longitudinal study of deaf and hearing children. Child Development,

Kistner, J., Dipper, L. ORCID: 0000-0002-5918-3898 and Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X (2018). The use and function of gestures in word-finding difficulties in aphasia. Aphasiology, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1541343

Swinburn, K., Best, W., Beeke, S., Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262, Smith, L., Willis, E. P., Ledingham, K., Sweeney, J. and McVicker, S. J. (2018). A concise patient reported outcome measure for people with aphasia: the aphasia impact questionnaire 21. Aphasiology, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1517406

Boonen, N., Kloots, H., Verhoeven, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-0738-8517 and Gillis, S. (2018). Can listeners hear the difference between children with normal hearing and children with a hearing impairment?. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, doi: 10.1080/02699206.2018.1513564

Garraffa, M., Guasti, M. T., Marinis, T. and Morgan, G. ORCID: 0000-0002-9495-1274 (2018). Editorial: Language Acquisition in Diverse Linguistic, Social and Cognitive Circumstances. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01807

Wallace, S. J., Worrall, L., Rose, T., Le Dorze, G., Breitenstein, C., Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849, Babbitt, E., Bose, A., Brady, M., Cherney, L. R., Copland, D., Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262, Enderby, P., Hersh, D., Howe, T., Kelly, H., Kiran, S., Laska, A-C., Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X, NIcholas, M., Patterson, J., Pearl, G., Rochon, E., Rose, M, Sage, K., Small, S. and Webster, J. (2018). A core outcome set for aphasia treatment research: the ROMA consensus statement. International Journal of Stroke,

Pritchard, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-1777-9095, Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849, Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. ORCID: 0000-0002-5918-3898 (2018). Psychometric properties of discourse measures in aphasia: acceptability, reliability, and validity. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 53(6), pp. 1078-1093. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12420

Roper, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-6950-6294, Grellmann, B., Neate, T., Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X and Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X (2018). Social networking sites: barriers and facilitators to access for people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 32(sup1:), pp. 1176-177. doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1486387

Crane, L., Wilcock, R., Maras, K. L., Chui, W., Marti-Sanchez, C. and Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 (2018). Mock juror perceptions of child witnesses on the autism spectrum: the impact of providing diagnostic labels and information about autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, doi: 10.1007/s10803-018-3700-0

Roper, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-6950-6294, Davey, I., Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X, Neate, T., Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X and Grellmann, B. (2018). Usability Testing – An Aphasia Perspective. Paper presented at the ASSETS 2018 The 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, 22 - 24 October 2018, Galway Ireland.

Messer, D., Bernardi, M., Botting, N. ORCID: 0000-0003-1082-9501, Hill, E., Nash, G., Leonard, H. and Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 (2018). An exploration of the factor structure of executive functioning in children. Frontiers in psychology, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01179

Messer, D. J., Bernardi, M., Botting, N. ORCID: 0000-0003-1082-9501, Hill, E. L., Nash, G., Leonard, H.C. and Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 (2018). Individual differences and their contribution to the factor structure of executive functioning in children. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, 1179.. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01179

Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X, Devane, N., Edmonds, L., Talbot, R., Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X, Woolf, C. and Zwart, N. (2018). Delivering word retrieval therapies for people with aphasia in a virtual communication environment. Aphasiology, 32(9), pp. 1054-1074. doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1488237

Crane, L., Batty, R., Adeyinka, H., Goddard, L., Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 and Hill, E. L. (2018). Autism diagnosis in the United Kingdom: Perspectives of autistic adults, parents and professionals. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,

Szewczyk, J., Chiat, S. ORCID: 0000-0002-8981-8153, Marecka, M. and Wodniecka-Chlipalska, Z. (2018). Nonword repetition depends on the frequency of sublexical representations at different grain sizes: evidence from a multi-factorial analysis. Cognition, doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2018.06.002

Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262, Blom Johansson, M., Isaksen, J. and Horton, S. (2018). Reporting interventions in communication partner training: a critical review and narrative synthesis of the literature. Aphasiology, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1482406

Litosseliti, E. ORCID: 0000-0002-3305-4713, Gill, R. ORCID: 0000-0002-2715-1867 and Favaro, L. (2018). Postfeminism as a critical tool for gender and language (study). Gender and Language,

De Clerck, I., Pettinato, M., Gillis, S., Verhoeven, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-0738-8517 and Gillis, S. (2018). Prosodic modulation in the babble of cochlear implanted and normally hearing infants: a perceptual study using a visual analogue scale. First Language, doi: 10.1177/0142723718773957

Breaks, A., Smith, C., Bloch, S. and Morgan, S. ORCID: 0000-0002-7573-4290 (2018). Blended diets for gastrostomy fed children: A scoping review. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, doi: 10.1111/jhn.12563

Marshall, J. ORCID: 0000-0002-6589-221X, Caute, A., Chadd, K., Cruice, M. ORCID: 0000-0001-7344-2262, Monnelly, K., Wilson, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-6445-654X and Woolf, C. (2018). Technology Enhanced Writing Therapy for People with Aphasia: Results of a Quasi-Randomised Waitlist Controlled Study. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12391

Pagnamenta, E. and Joffe, V. ORCID: 0000-0001-9132-2889 (2018). Preregistration research training of speech and language therapists in the United Kingdom: a nationwide audit of quantity, content and delivery. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, doi: 10.1097/XEB.0000000000000143

Gordon, R., Smith-Spark, J. H., Newton, E. J. and Henry, L. ORCID: 0000-0001-5422-4358 (2018). Executive Function and Academic Achievement in Primary School Children: The Use of Task-Related Processing Speed. Frontiers in Psychology, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00582

Harding, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5192-2027, Mynard, A. and Hills, E. (2018). Identification of premature infant states in relation to introducing oral feeding. Journal of Neonatal Nursing, 24(2), pp. 104-110. doi: 10.1016/j.jnn.2017.11.018

Morgan, S., Luxon, E., Soomro, A. and Harding, C. (2018). Use of mealtime advice mats in special schools for children with learning disabilities. Learning disability Practice, 21(1), pp. 20-26. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2018.e1856

Hilari, K. ORCID: 0000-0003-2091-4849, Galante, L., Huck, Anneline, Pritchard, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-1777-9095, Allen, L. and Dipper, L. ORCID: 0000-0002-5918-3898 (2018). Cultural adaptation and psychometric testing of The Scenario Test UK for people with aphasia. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12379

Harding, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5192-2027 and Levin, A. (2018). NICE Guidance for Developmental Follow–up of Children Born Preterm. Infant, 14(2), pp. 62-63.

Knight, R.-A., Bandali, C., Woodhead, C. and Vansadia, P. (2018). Clinicians’ views of the training, use and maintenance of phonetic transcription in speech and language therapy. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12381

Wilcock, R., Crane, L., Hobson, Z., Nash, G., Kirke-Smith, M. and Henry, L. (2018). Supporting child witnesses during identification lineups: Exploring the effectiveness of Registered Intermediaries. Applied Cognitive Psychology,

Henry, L., Crane, L., Nash, G., Hobson, Z., Kirke-Smith, M. and Wilcock, R. (2018). Response to 'No Evidence Against Sketch Reinstatement of Context, Verbal Labels or Registered Intermediaries'. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, doi: 10.1007/s10803-018-3496-y

Cocks, N., Byrne, S., Pritchard, M., Morgan, G. and Dipper, L. (2018). Integration of speech and gesture in aphasia. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12372

Morgan, S., Drury, C., Thomas, M. and Harding, C. (2018). A survey of UK Special School Speech & Language Therapists (SLT) and school staff regarding the use of mealtime mats to provide eating and drinking guidelines. Poster presented at the UK Swallowing Research Group 2018 conference, 1-2 Feb 2018, London, UK.

Amaya, A., Woolf, C., Devane, N., Galliers, J. R., Talbot, R., Wilson, S. and Marshall, J. (2018). Receiving Aphasia Intervention in a Virtual Environment: The Participants’ Perspective. Aphasiology, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2018.1431831

Harding, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5192-2027 and Stewart, A. (2018). Commentary on" Evaluating service users’ experiences of using Talking Mats™". Tizard Learning Disability Review, 23(2), pp. 87-90. doi: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2017-0041

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