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About City

Centre for Healthcare Innovation Research

Welcome to CHIR, the interdisciplinary Centre for Healthcare Innovation Research - bringing a fresh perspective to the challenges of embedding health and social care innovations, sustainably and at scale.

About us

We are a unique interdisciplinary venture, jointly set up in January 2019 by CASS Business School and the School of Health Sciences at City, University of London.

Our team works across a range of academic fields such as health sciences, organisational studies, implementation research and social sciences. We seek to build a strong community that bridges disciplines and professions to support the embedding of innovations in healthcare.

Our research serves the needs of policy-makers who seek to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare services, and the demands of practitioners and service users who aim to ensure the availability of the best possible services and treatments.

CHIR is developing new professional and executive development courses which build on the extensive experience and reputation of City in the education of professionals in various disciplines such as nursing, language and communication, business and management, and now also medical leadership. CHIR is already providing novel modules in the existing programmes taught by the two schools; the recently launched Executive Master’s in Medical Leadership and the highly regarded MSc in Health Management.


Get involved

For more information and any queries, please get in touch with us:

Centre for Healthcare Innovation Research (CHIR)
City, University of London
Northampton Square
London, EC1V 0HB

CHIR@city.ac.uk
+44 (0) 20 7040 4032
Follow us @CHIR_City
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People

CHIR Members

Raheelah Ahmad

Dr Raheelah Ahmad is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Health Sciences. Raheelah leads the Health Management and Leadership and the Innovation and Change teaching on the Health Management MSc programme. She contributes an international health dimension as well as key considerations from a knowledge mobilisation perspective at the macro-strategic level.

Follow Raheelah Ahmad @RahAhmad

Zuhur Balayah

Zuhur Balayah is a PhD Candidate at CHIR. Zuhur's PhD research focuses on the ways in which the speed and effectiveness of the implementation of innovations in NHS organizations may be enhanced by learning from the experience of other sites. Through the lenses of organizational theory and implementation science, she is interested in exploring how forms of social learning relate to achieving implementation outcomes, by exploring the possible value of vicarious learning from other implementation sites for implementing organizations. Her current research looks at conceptualising implementation depth of healthcare innovations. Prior to beginning her PhD, Zuhur held a research position within the Centre for Implementation Science at King’s College London. She holds a BSc in Pharmacology and an MSc in Public Health.

Follow Zuhur Balayah @ZuhurBalayah

Yaru Chen

Dr Yaru Chen is Research Fellow at CHIR. Yaru’s research focuses on exploring innovation diffusion in healthcare organizations, informed by a number of theoretical perspectives, including professional identity, sensemaking, sensegiving, and job crafting. Yaru has led a few projects including the spread and scaling up of a healthcare innovation called StarTBack, which helps GPs and physiotherapists to stratify care for patients with lower back pain, and the spread and scaling up of system level innovation Medical Alliances (MAs) introduced to the Chinese healthcare system in its recent reforms.

Follow Yaru Chen @yaru_emma

Victoria Cluley

Dr Victoria Cluley is Research Fellow at Cass Business School. Victoria’s research interest is experiences of health and illness, focusing on healthcare and public service experiences.  Victoria is particularly interested in personal experiences can be used to improve services.  She has led research projects in a number of health settings including local authorities, hospitals, clinical commissioning groups, and voluntary organisations. Victoria is also interested innovative and participatory methods and the accessible dissemination of research findings.

Follow Victoria Cluley @bicboria

Sabrina Germain

Dr Sabrina Germain is a Senior Lecturer in at The City Law School. Her research interests lies in the connections between public and private entities in healthcare law. She is most interested in the role of medical profession in the elaboration of healthcare reforms and questions of resource allocation for the British, Canadian and American healthcare systems. Dr Germain is a member of the Central London NHS Research Ethics Committee and a research associate at University of Montreal’s Health Hub: Politics, Organizations and Law (H-POD).

Follow Sabrina Germain @sabrinakgermain

Kyriaki Giorgakoudi

Dr Kyriaki Giorgakoudi is a Senior Research Fellow of School of Health Sciences.She is a mathematical modeller and health economist interested in the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of healthcare innovations. Kyriaki has experience in modelling the implementation of immunisation programmes and cancer-related innovations. She has received funding from City, University of London and the NIHR.

Follow Kyriaki Giorgakoudi @giorgakoudi

Amit Nigam

Prof Amit Nigam is a Professor in Management at the Cass Business School. His research focuses on the change in work within and across professions and on processes of organizational change two themes that are crucial to understanding the healthcare innovation. Embedding innovation in healthcare involves significant organizational change, as well as the change to professional work. This process will be more likely if professionals in healthcare settings act and interact in ways that embrace innovation and cement them into new ways of working.

Harry Scarbrough

Prof Harry Scarbrough is Co-director of CHIR, and brings a wealth of experience in research on healthcare innovation and knowledge translation. This includes the role of Principal Investigator on a major NIHR-funded study of the role of social networks in bridging the gap between research and practice in healthcare settings. He was Director of the ESRC research programme on ‘The Evolution of Business Knowledge’, and has also led ESRC and EPSRC-funded studies of innovation in a range of other sectors, including manufacturing, financial services, and video games. His work has been published in leading international journals, including Organization Studies, Social Science and Medicine, and Information Systems Research.

Charitini Stavropoulou

Dr Charitini Stavropoulou is Co-director of CHIR. She is a health services researcher, with a background in health economics and policy. She has been interested in the role patients play in health and health care and she has more recently started doing research on the impact that funded health research has on academic, economic and social outcomes and innovation in the UK. Charitini’s work has appeared in leading international journals, including The BMJ, The Lancet Public Health, Milbank Quarterly, Social Science and Medicine and Journal of Health Economics among others. She has received funding from different bodies, including The Health Foundation, NIHR and The Royal Marsden.

Follow Charitini Stavropoulou @CharitiniSt

Alexandra Ziemann

Dr Alexandra Ziemann is Senior Research Fellow at CHIR. Her research focuses on improving the spread of innovations in health and social care. Alexandra’s current work investigates implementation and spread approaches applied by Academic Health Science Networks across England, the influence of external contextual factors on the implementation of innovations, and the adaptation of innovations that spread from high to low- and middle-income countries. She brings 14 years of experience working in the fields of implementation science, public health, and health services research with a special focus on improving ambulance services.

Follow Alexandra Ziemann @_aziemann


Community

CHIR Collaborative

Calling all City scholars interested in health and social care innovation research! The CHIR Collaborative brings together scholars at City who are interested in collaborating on research activities around embedding innovations. The CHIR Collaborative discusses innovation research ideas, grant applications, or publication drafts either on their bespoke virtual exchange platform or face-to-face in a monthly meeting. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch!

CHIR Partners

CHIR is convening a wider community of stakeholder organisations and research partners including professional groups, service users and policymakers to inform and collaborate in research projects and connect to the challenges facing health and social care practice. Please get in touch if you are interested in connecting with us.

CHIR Advisory Board

Research

CHIR produces research which supports practitioners, policy-makers, and other stakeholders facing the complex challenges of embedding healthcare innovations; that is, implementing innovations sustainably and at scale.

Our work connects the introduction of innovations to the shifting work patterns and organizational changes required to scale and sustain them in practice. By drawing on the expertise of two highly ranked Schools at City, University of London - CASS Business School and the School of Health Sciences – the Centre provides the interdisciplinary approach needed to analyse, evaluate and improve this dynamic process of embedding innovation. This involves the deployment of a range of methodological tools, including both the tracking of innovation journeys over time, and cross-sectional comparison of innovations.

Our research aims to develop the evidence base for improving the sustainable implementation and spread of healthcare innovations by identifying generalisable aspects and mechanisms of the way such innovations are adopted, adapted and embedded across different contexts. Our work therefore involves multiple projects which reflect the major themes of our approach as being;

  • Evidence-based and interdisciplinary;
  • Encompassing different types of innovation across multiple levels of healthcare systems;
  • Addressing different national and organizational contexts for innovation spread and implementation;
  • Assessing patient and public involvement in embedding innovations.

Projects

A selection of current projects are outlined below:

Evidence-based and interdisciplinary

Systematic reviews conceptualising implementation depth and innovation diffusion

Healthcare innovations are often not sustained after adoption and vary in their effectiveness when scaled-up across different sites. Diverging research strands focus on either implementation or scale-up/diffusion. These strands typically have different analysis levels, focus on different implementation phases and are conducted in different research fields, e.g., health research (implementation), organisation studies (diffusion). This systematic review aims at synthesising evidence on implementation depth and innovation diffusion published in these diverging research fields. It is expected to shed light on the blind spot in our understanding of how to achieve both, the widespread and sustainable implementation of innovations, or the ‘embedding of innovations’.

Multi-level analysis

System innovation scale-up in China

A system level innovation - Medical Alliance (MA) – was established throughout China in recent years following the 2009 health care reform, and has received considerable attention from policy makers, academics and international development organisations. MAs are collaborative alliances involving the integration of primary and community care organisations with secondary and tertiary care hospital providers. The objective of MAs is to promote the usage of the newly established Community Health Centres (CHCs) and to reduce demand for hospital-based secondary and tertiary care to achieve more effective healthcare delivery. However, there are significant obstacles to adopting and scaling up such a large-scale change or system innovation. This project allow us to gain an ‘insider look’ at a few MA models across three different cities in China to examine the scale up and spread of such complex system-level innovation.

Different types of innovation

Spread of a social prescribing tool in the NHS

GP practices in the UK face significant increases in workload due to a combination of staff shortages and the escalating pressures posed by chronic conditions and illness. In response to this growing demand, the NHS long-term plan mandates much greater use of digitally-based services in the coming period. The widespread popularity of social media as a means of exchanging information also indicates the potential acceptability and benefits of new digital services for patients. The primary aim of the study is to understand how such a digitally-based service – a social prescribing tool, is being adopted and applied in GP practices by multiple health professionals working in the practice. Greater understanding of the factors enabling or constraining effective adoption and implementation will be of benefit to the developers and users of this particular service by helping to improve its further development, and supporting take up amongst patient groups. The study will also serve a wider need in the UK healthcare community by showing how an innovative tool can be more effectively embedded into existing healthcare organizations and practices to secure significant benefits for staff and patients.

Startback

The Startback tool is an innovative triage screening tool. It is developed for GPs and physiotherapists to help assess patients with lower back pain, stratify them into low, medium, or high risk categories, and provide them with matched treatments. We follow the journey of the tool diffusion from 2015 to 2018, and show the variation in different professional groups’ responses (GPs, physiotherapists) to the innovation and the way it is adapted. In doing so, we are able to demonstrate dynamics of distributed leadership in the spread of innovations and the interplay between innovation adaptation and professional practice. This project not only contributes to the literature on innovation diffusion in public service, but also provides valuable implications for policy and practice.

The role of implementation process in shaping technology innovation outcomes in healthcare

The outcome of a technological innovation is dependent upon the way in which the innovation is implemented. The process of implementation interacts with other contextual factors, at multiple levels, and also with the innovation itself. This study aims to contribute to a more systematic and integrated understanding of the role of the implementation process for healthcare innovations. It employs a two-phased in-depth analysis investigating 34 technology implementation journeys across 12 NHS trusts. In phase I, through 121 interviews we unpack rich implementation process dynamics within each of the specific organizational cases. In phase II, by applying Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), we identify which configurations of characteristics of the innovation, the implementation process and the organisational context are linked to innovation outcomes.

Innovation in different contexts

Review of spread and adoption approaches across the AHSN Network

In recent years, the rate of adoption of innovations in healthcare practice has increased. However, spreading such innovations at a large scale beyond an initial pilot site is still a challenge. There is a lack of understanding of what makes innovations spread successfully across different contexts. The Academic Health Science Networks (AHSN) as key innovation arm of NHS England are aligning key stakeholders together for spreading innovations in health and social care at the regional level. The study will investigate and determine lessons for spread and adoption of innovations from an analysis of the different approaches developed and applied by the 15 AHSNs in England.Understanding the different approaches of spread of innovation among AHSNs will provide useful guidance at the operational level for change agents within AHSNs, at the senior staff level for determining capacity and resources required for spread, for health and social care staff in receipt of support from AHSNs, and the wider academic community by investigating how relevant theory has been operationalised in real world settings.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the AHSNs were changing their approaches to rapidly implement and spread innovations in response to the pandemic. The study will also explore the approaches to rapid implementation and spread taken by AHSNs during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic to provide formative feedback to AHSNs to support their spread work during the course of COVID-19 and gather early insights on what works in rapid implementation.

Contextualised adaptation of social care innovations spreading from high to low- and middle-income countries

Given the cost and time involved in developing and testing new interventions, low- and middle-income countries are adopting proven interventions from elsewhere. The challenge remains how to adapt and implement such interventions to fit the local context. The CASCI project (2019) develops a new practical implementation framework to support the adaptation of social care interventions in low- and middle-income countries through a scoping review and workshops with international experts and local practitioners in South Africa and Tanzania. The follow-up project CASCI II (2020-21) is aiming at validating the CASCI framework in a qualitative empirical study. In this project we are monitoring the adaptation process of a high-income country social care intervention into a community health intervention to ensure adherence to COVID-19 guidelines in two township communities in South Africa.

Understanding external implementation context – A best-fit framework synthesis

Variations in the external context such as the political and funding environment, cultural context, location, historical developments or population demographics can influence implementation outcomes but this influence is little understood. We aim to develop a framework conceptualising the influence of external contextual factors on the implementation of health and social care interventions. The framework is developed based on a two-stage systematic review following the ‘best fit’ framework synthesis approach. The first stage of the review examines existing frameworks, models, and theories on external contextual factors and their influence on implementation from a variety of sectors and disciplines such as health and social care, education, environmental studies, and international development. The resulting meta-framework is then tested and refined in the second review stage by synthesising evidence from empirical studies focusing on the implementation of health and social care interventions that spread within or across countries. The final framework can be used to identify factors explaining the decline and variability in effectiveness of interventions but also the prospects of implementation success when spreading interventions within or across countries.

The influence of external context on the implementation of the London Ambulance Service’s Maternity Screening and Action Tool

This spread of an innovation often results in large variation of how well the innovation works in different areas. There is only a limited understanding of what role the characteristics of these different places or external contexts (e.g. political and financial context, geography and location, demographics of the service population, networks between service providers, historical developments) play when implementing an innovation in different areas. This study will explore the impact of external context characteristics on implementation outcome using the Maternity Screening and Action Tool (maternity card) developed by the London Ambulance Service NHS Trust (LAS) as an example. The LAS introduced the maternity card as a prompt for frontline staff to improve the delivery of emergency maternity care. The card was rolled out across London in 2016. This qualitative realist evaluation study aims at understanding what it is about the external context that make the maternity card work in different areas in London. The study is expected to result in a middle range theory formulated as context-mechanism-outcome construct(s) which can inform the spread and implementation of similar innovations. The results of the study are also intended to inform the refinement of a conceptual framework on the influence of external implementation context which is currently being developed.

Patient and public involvement

Role of patient and public involvement in embedding innovations in healthcare – A scoping review

Substantial evidence exists regarding patient and public involvement in research, but it is less clear what we know about patient and public involvement in the later stages of the innovation journey when innovations are implemented and spread in healthcare practice. This scoping review aims at identifying and mapping the currently available evidence regarding the role, influence or impact of patient and public involvement during different healthcare innovation stages from research and development via implementation, to scale-up and spread. Such mapping will identify current evidence gaps to derive new research objectives.

Publications

Chen, Y. and Reay, T. (2020). Responding to imposed job redesign: the evolving dynamics of work and identity in restructuring professional identity. Human Relations. DOI: 10.1177/0018726720906437

Liu Z., Kirkpatrick, I., Chen, Y., Mei J (2020). Overcoming the legacy of marketisation: China's response to COVID-19 and the fast-forward of healthcare reorganisation. BMJ Leader. Published online first: 10 September 2020, DOI: 10.1136/leader-2020-000294

Khadjesari, Z., Boufkhed, S., Vitoratou, S., Schatte, L., Ziemann, A., Daskalopoulou, E., Uglik-Marucha, E., Sevdalis, N. and Hull, L. (2020). Implementation outcome instruments for use in physical healthcare settings: a systematic review. Implementation Science 15, 66. DOI: 10.1186/s13012-020-01027-6.

Srivastava, D., Scarbrough, H., Stavropoulou, C. (2020). Current regulatory challenges to support the spread of digital health technologies. CHIR Report, July 2020.

Ziemann, A., Brown, L., Sadler, E., Ocloo, J., Boaz, A. and Sandall, J. (2019). Influence of external contextual factors on the implementation of health and social care interventions into practice within or across countries - A protocol for a 'best fit' framework synthesis. Systematic Reviews, 8, 258. DOI: 10.1186/s13643-019-1180-8

Events

3 November 2020: 10th CHIR Collaborative VIRTUAL Workshop | The Impact of COVID-19 on the implementation and spread of innovations

At the CHIR Collaborative workshop, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research – we are discussing 2-3 proposals at each meeting. This time we will focus on the impact of COVID-19 on the implementation and spread of innovations. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.



17 September 2020: 9th CHIR Collaborative VIRTUAL Workshop

At the CHIR Collaborative workshop, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research – we are discussing 2-3 proposals at each meeting. This time we will focus on Patient and Public Involvement in Innovation Research. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


6 July 2020: 8th CHIR Collaborative VIRTUAL Workshop

At the CHIR Collaborative workshop, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research – we are discussing 2-3 proposals at each meeting. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


18 May 2020: 7th CHIR Collaborative VIRTUAL Workshop - COVID-19 related research edition


At the next CHIR Collaborative workshop which will be held virtually, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research, with a special focus on COVID-19 related research. We are discussing 2-3 proposals at the meeting. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


12 February 2020: 6th CHIR Collaborative Workshop
At the CHIR Collaborative workshop, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research – we are discussing 2-3 proposals at each meeting. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


12 December 2019, The Shard, London: Healthcare Management & Services Research Incubator
Join us at the Healthcare Management & Services Research Incubator offering mentoring on research in progress, co-organised with Warwick Business School, Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management, and BMJ Leader. Keynote speaker: Professor Sara Singer, Stanford University.
This event is open to academics conducting research in the context of health services and/or pharma, from any university/department, clinical researchers, applied policy researchers, and health-system based health services researchers.

More information and registration


28 November 2019: 5th CHIR Collaborative workshop
At the CHIR Collaborative workshop, you can receive feedback and advice from City colleagues on your ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of innovation and implementation research – we are discussing 2-3 proposals at each meeting. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


30 October 2019: Launch Event: Embedding Innovation in Healthcare

You are warmly invited to attend the Launch Event for the new interdisciplinary Centre for Healthcare Innovation Research (CHIR), based in Cass Business School & School of Health Sciences, City, University of London. The focus of the centre's work is on the challenges of spreading and sustaining innovations in healthcare.

The event will set out CHIR's approach to these challenges, together with the valuable insights provided by distinguished speakers, drawn from research and practitioner communities in UK healthcare - Professor Trish Greenhalgh (University of Oxford) and Professor Marcel Levi (CEO, University College London Hospital)

Read the launch event news report .

Review the Launch Event presentation

CHIR Launch highlights and reflections


23 September 2019: 4th CHIR Collaborative meeting
At the monthly CHIR Collaborative meeting, we are discussing 1-2 ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of embedding innovations, led by a City colleague. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


6 June 2019: 3rd CHIR Collaborative meeting
At the monthly CHIR Collaborative meeting, we are discussing 1-2 ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of embedding innovations, led by a City colleague. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


8 May 2019: Innovation in Cancer Care – the journey to improving outcomes for all
The Centre for Healthcare Innovation Research (CHIR) and Bupa UK brought together some of the United Kingdom's leading healthcare practitioners and researchers for their first co-sponsored event on delivering innovation in cancer care.
Read a news article about the event.


2 April 2019: 2nd CHIR Collaborative meeting
At the monthly CHIR Collaborative meeting, we are discussing 1-2 ideas/proposals for research projects, grant applications or publications in the area of embedding innovations, led by a City colleague. If you are a City scholar interested in joining the CHIR Collaborative, please get in touch.


13 February 2019: Inaugural CHIR Collaborative workshop
Collagues from CASS Business School and School of Health Sciences interested in collaborating with CHIR on research activities around embedding innovations meet for the first time to help shape CHIR’s research agenda.

News

1 October 2020: Zuhur Balayah joining CHIR as PhD Candidate

We are very happy to welcome Zuhur Balayah to the team. She will be doing her PhD with us and the NIHRZuhur Balayah headshot Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) North Thames on "Accelerating the implementation of innovations in NHS organisations by learning from other sites". Looking forward to working with you over the next 3 years.


30 September 2020: Dr Alexandra Ziemann re-elected to the Board of the European Implementation Collaborative

Congratulations to Dr Alexandra Ziemann for being re-elected for two more years into the Board of the European Implementation Collaborative (EIC). EIC logoIn her role, Alexandra will be the liason person between the EIC and the UK Implementation Society.


25 September 2020: China's response to COVID-19 - New publication in BMJ Leader

A new comment by Dr Yaru Chen and colleagues from Huazhong Universtiy of City News Report on new publicationScience and Technology (Wuhan), University of York, and Zhongnan University of Economic and Law (Wuhan) published in BMJ Leader explores the effects of the legacy of marketisation of China's health system on the country's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Read the City, University of London news report here. Read the full-text article here.


7 September 2020: New research publication on professional job role changes

New research publication by Dr Yaru Chen and Prof Trish Reay, University of Alberta City news item on Yaru Chen's researchSchool of Business, has outlined a four-step process that professionals undergo when their job role is changed by an organisation. Read the City Businses School news report here. Read the Warwick Business School news report here. Read the HR Magazine article here. Read the open access full-text article here.


2 August 2020: Deadline to apply for PhD Studentship at CHIR & ARC North ThamesTop down image of student using a laptop
CHIR in collaboration with the NIHR Applied Research Collaboration North Thames is offering a funded 3-year PhD studentship starting from September 2020 on the topic "Accelerating the implementation of innovations in NHS organisations by learning from other sites". Find more information and apply here.


31 July 2020: First CHIR Report published: Regulatory challenges in spreading digital health technologies

CHIR has published its first report exploring the topic of "Current regulatory challenges to CHIR Report July 2020 title pagesupport the spread of digital health technologies". You can download the report here.


8 July 2020: CHIR presents at British Institute of Radiology Event

Dr Yaru Chen presents research on “Practitioner response to the prospective usescreenshot video presentation Yaru Chen of AI in radiology” at the event “Patient centred care in the era of artificial intelligence and technological innovation” organised by the British Institute of Radiology. You can watch the recording of the presentation here.


1 July 2020: New project: Implementing a COVID-19 community response intervention in South African townships

CHIR is co-investigator on a Logos Uni Bath and Stellenbosch Uninew project led by the University of Bath and together with Stellenbosch University to adapt and implement a social care intervention from a high-income-country context into a COVID-19 community response intervention in a low-and-middle-income country context in South African townships. The research is co-funded by the UKRI Global Challenges Research Fund.


05 May 2020 – New research project on learning from rapid implementation approach during COVID-19

Our ongoing “Review of spread and adoption approaches across the AHSN Network” qualitative study will be extended to explore the approaches to rapid implementation and spread taken by AHSNs during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic to provide formative feedback to AHSNs to support their spread work during the course of COVID-19 and gather early insights on what works in rapid implementation. We will be organising three focus groups for AHSN staff in June/July 2020 to exchange on their experiences and lessons learnt with rapid implementation during COVID-19 and reflect on what changes they would like to sustain into the future. We aim to produce a rapid learning short report to the AHSN Network and the NHS Accelerated Access Collaborative by September to inform ongoing COVID-19 rapid implementation work at the AHSNs.


Ai@work5 March 2020: AI@Work Conference
Radhika Narasinkan, Honorary Fellow CHIR and Public Health England presented on translating AI into healthcare practice at the AI@WORK Conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.


Masterclass25 February 2020: Master Class for UKRI Digital Health Technology Catalyst
Charitini Stavropoulou and Harry Scarbrough presented a Masterclass on ‘The Innovation Journey - Spreading and Embedding Innovation’ for the Digital Health Technology Catalyst of the UKRI.


7th February 2020: BBC World Service's World Update Programme

Yaru Chen was interviewed by the BBC World Service's World Update Programme to discuss bbc news china video screenshotthe current state of the healthcare system in China within the context of the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan. Read the summary article here.


2 January 2020 – New research project reviews spread approaches across Academic Health Science Networks (AHSN) in England

A new qualitative empirical research project led by CHIR, aac and ahsn network logosWessex AHSN, and South West AHSN and co-funded by the AHSN Network and the NHS Accelerated Access Collaborative will investigate and determine lessons for spread and adoption of innovations from an analysis of the different approaches developed and applied by the 15 AHSNs in England. The AHSNs as key innovation arm of NHS England are aligning key stakeholders together for spreading innovations in health and social care at the regional level. Understanding the different approaches of spread of innovation among AHSNs will provide useful guidance at the operational level for change agents within AHSNs, at the senior staff level for determining capacity and resources required for spread, for health and social care staff in receipt of support from AHSNs, and the wider academic community by investigating how relevant theory has been operationalised in real world settings.


13-15 December 2019: Kyoto Workshop
Yaru Chen presented at the EGOS and Organization Studies Kyoto Workshop 2019 and discussed professional identity formation for General Practitioners and the implementation of system-level innovation in China.


Panel speakers sitting in front of event presentation title screen.30 October 2019: CHIR Launch Event
CHIR has officially launched! Many thanks to our chair Dr Amanda Goodall, our speakers Prof Andrew Jones, Prof Trish Greenhalgh, Prof Marcel Levi and Prof Zoe Radnor and to all who came and joined us!
Find the launch event news report, videos, presentations and more here.


16-17 September 2019: CHIR co-hosts workshop at the 5th Global Implementation Conference
CHIR is co-hosting a workshop with the Department of Social and Policy Sciences, University of Bath and the MST Institute on adapting innovations into different contexts at the 5th Global Implementation Conference in Glasgow, United Kingdom. Alexandra Ziemann is presenting findings of the project Contextualised adaptation of social care innovations spreading from high to low- and middle-income countries .


25 July 2019: All new and shiny CHIR website is online
We have a (this) new website. Please visit again for updates on our research, activities, and events!


18 July 2019: CHIR presents a poster at the 2nd UK Implementation Science Research Conference
We present preliminary results from our multidisciplinary systematic reviews on implementation depth and diffusion of innovations at the 2nd UK Implementation Science Research Conference in London, United Kingdom.


4-6 July 2019: CHIR presents at the 35th EGOS Colloquium
CHIR is attending the 35th European Group for Organizational Studies Colloquiumin Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Yiannis Kyratsis, Alexandra Ziemann and Harry Scarbrough present the paper “Beyond Barriers: The role of the implementation process in shaping technology innovation outcomes in healthcare” in sub-theme 32: Technological Innovation in Healthcare Organizations: Panacea or Pandora’s Box?


2-3 July 2019: CHIR hosts workshop on interdisciplinary innovation research at HSRUK 2019
CHIR hosts a workshop entitled “Can an interdisciplinary approach help improve sustainable implementation and spread of healthcare innovations?” at the Health Services Research UK 2019 Conference in Manchester, United Kingdom. Chaired by Yiannis Kyratsis, the workshop saw presentations by Yaru Chen on the Startback study Alexandra Ziemann on the London Ambulance Service Maternity Card implementation study and Radhika Sriskandarajah on Artificial Intelligence adoption in breast cancer screening, followed by an interactive discussion with the audience on the pros and cons of interdisciplinary innovation research.


1 July 2019: CHIR has a new co-director
CHIR co-founder and co-director Dr Yiannis Kyratsis leaves City, University of London, for a new post as Head of the Organization Theory Group and Associate Professor Organization Theory at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Dr Charitini Stavropoulou is succeeding him as our new co-director.


13 February 2019: You can now follow us on Twitter @CHIR_City
CHIR is now on Twitter – follow us on @CHIR_City!


1 January 2019: CHIR is officially starting its work
CHIR is officially starting its work and welcomes two new members to the core team: Research Fellow Dr Yaru Chen and Senior Research Fellow Dr Alexandra Ziemann.