People
  1. Students
  2. Alumni
  3. Honorary Graduates
  4. Academic Experts
  1. Martin Caraher
People

portrait of Professor Martin Caraher

Professor Martin Caraher

Professor of food and health policy

School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Sociology

Contact Information

Contact

Visit Martin Caraher

D110, Rhind Building

null

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Background

Martin is professor of food and health policy at Centre for Food Policy at City University, London. He originally trained as an environmental health officer in Dublin. After working in the north west of Ireland he developed an interest in the public health and health promotion aspects of the work. He spent some time working in the Irish and the English health services managing health promotion and public health services respectively.

He has worked for and acted as a consultant to the UK Dept of Health, the World Bank and the World Health Organisation. He was a trustee of the Caroline Walker trust. He was a member of the original London Food Board which developed the food strategy for London. He was a member of the Olympic Food Group representing public health interests on behalf of public health in the region. He also sat on the South East Food and Public Health Group which developed a food strategy for the SE region and from which the London food strategy emerged.

He currently acts as an advisor on food matters to a number of social science research groups across Europe, as well he is an advisor to the European Executive Agency for Health and Consumers (DG Sanco). He is a member of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) scientific committee. He sits on the safefood Irl scientific committee, which is an all -Ireland body set up under the terms of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. He has been involved in the following:

- Bristol food strategy
- Brighton and Hove food policy
- Islington Food Policy and Hearty Islington
- Policy for fast food outlets in Tower Hamlets, Barking & Dagenham, Merseyside and Glasgow
- Member of the Scottish Food and Drink Policy Group
- Member of the Scottish Food Research Working Group
- Advisor to the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology on Nutritional Standards in UK Schools, 2009
- Advisor to the Glasgow Centre for Population Health
- Advisor to the International Federation for Home Economics on global aspects of food policy
- Chair of the Healthy Communities Collaborative
- Member of the Olympic Food Group
- Advisor to the BMA on children's' food choices
-NICE Advisory group on prevention of coronary heart disease

He was the 2008 HealthWays (West Australia) scholar and spent two months in Perth, WA examining issues of access to food and food banks (Aus$20K). During this period he worked with local service providers, policy makers and academics. He was the Thinker in residence at Deakin, University, Melbourne in 2012/13 (see http://youtu.be/UabUGsqVgIc).

Martin regularly reviews for a wide range of journals and organisations ranging from Public Health Nutrition to Social Science and Medicine.

He regularly appears on TV and radio in relation to food issues.

Qualifications

PhD, South Bank University, 1993/7
MSc Health Promotion, King’s College London, 1987/8

P/G Diploma in Health Education, University of Ulster, 1984/5
Diploma in Environmental Health, University of Dublin, 1975/78

Employment

2009 - Present Professor of Food and Health Policy, Centre for Food Policy, City University, London.
2002 - 2009 Reader in Food and Health Policy, Centre for Food Policy, City University, London.
2000 - 2002 Reader in Food and Social Policy Thames Valley University, London.
1993 - 2000 Senior Lecturer Queen Charlottes, School of Nursing.
1988 - 1991 Director of Health Promotion Services Ealing Health Authority, London.
1981 - 1987 Health Education Officer, Western Health Board, Galway, Eire.
1978 - 1981 Environmental Health Officer, North Western Health Board Offices, Donegal and Sligo, Eire.

Research

Martin has worked extensively on issues related to food poverty, cooking skills, local sustainable food supplies, the role of markets and co-ops in promoting health, farmers markets, food deserts & food access, retail concentration and globalisation.

Current research interests include:

- The role of local food projects in promoting health
- Access to food in urban areas
- The contribution of local food projects to health and wellbeing
- A review of the planning process in promoting food and health
- The role of food markets in promoting health and well-being
- Farmers markets and new selling spaces
- Food co-operatives and social enterprises
- Food Banks and welfare policies
- Cooking skills among young people and the changing nature of food skills and the culinary transition
- Health literacy including cooking as a key skill
- Food safety in the household setting - the role of food literacy
- Urban spaces and policy development
- Food security and food banks

Recent work has focused on the impact of food advertising on children's food choices and the impact of advertising regulation. In addition he has been developing work in schools and this has included work for the UK Dept of Health, the World Health Organization (Europe) on school feeding programmes in Latvia and for the World Bank on school food in Lesotho. He is working with colleagues in Australia in the Coalition on Food Advertising to Children, sharing ideas and resources. His interests in sustainability come from the perspective of local food chains and the attempts by social enterprises to build sustainability into their work.

Research Students

Name
Amanda McCloat
Thesis Title
“An Investigation of the impact of formal food based teaching curricula, such as Home Economics in post primary schools, on the culinary skills, food literacy, nutritional knowledge, eating habits and health of adolescents on the Island of Ireland."
Name
Anita Tull
Thesis Title
Why teach young people to cook: A critical review of the UK.
Name
Georgia Machell
Thesis Title
Welfare food: the relationship between policy and practice
Name
Harvey Ells
Thesis Title
Street food markets and consumer wellbeing: a study at four developed urban city centres.
Name
Lynne Richards
Thesis Title
Lay community health advisors: a UK Canadian comparison of policy
Name
Raquel Ajates
Thesis Title
Agricultural cooperatives and food system sustainability: the case of Spain and the UK
Name
Rebecca Wells
Thesis Title
Emerging research on food, nutrition and cancer prevention – how and why it is reported by the UK news media and the implications for food policy.
Name
Sharon Noonan Gunning
Thesis Title
Parents: the ‘unheard stakeholders’ in child obesity policy: a sociological study of false consciousness
Name
Connie St Louis
Thesis Title
What is a Science Journalist for?

Publications

Books (5)

  1. Caraher, M. and Coveney, J. (2016). Food Poverty and Insecurity: International Food inequalities. Switzerland: Springer.
  2. Lang, T., Barling, D. and Caraher, M. (2009). Food policy. Oxford University Press, USA. ISBN 978-0-19-856788-2.
  3. Lang, T., Barling, D. and Caraher, M. (2009). Food Policy: Integrating health, environment and society. ISBN 978-0-19-172412-1.
  4. Caraher, M. (2000). Lifespan Development in a Mixed Economy of Care. W.B. Saunders Company. ISBN 978-0-443-05736-6.
  5. Caraher, M. and Marks-Moran, D. (1996). Psychological Aspects of Caring in a Mixed Economy. Open Learning Foundation, W.B. Saunders Company. ISBN 978-0-443-05733-5.

Chapters (26)

  1. Caraher, M. (2016). Food literacy beyond the individual: The nexus between personal skills and victim blaming. Food Literacy: Key Concepts for Health and Education (pp. 118–133). ISBN 978-1-315-70849-2.
  2. Vidgen, H. and Caraher, M. (2016). Food literacy: Key concepts and the elephants in the room. Food Literacy: Key Concepts for Health and Education (pp. 238–243). ISBN 978-1-315-70849-2.
  3. Ronson, D. and Caraher, M. (2016). Food Bank: Big Society or Shunting yards? Successful Failures. In Caraher, M. and Coveney, J. (Eds.), Food Poverty and Insecurity: International Food inequalities (pp. 79–88). Switzerland: Springer.
  4. Wells, and Caraher, M. (2016). Britain's Hidden Hungry? The Portrayal of Food Bank Users in the U.K. National Press. In Servaes, J. and Oyedemi, T. (Eds.), The Praxis of Social Inequality in Media A Global Perspective Lexington Books. ISBN 978-1-4985-2347-9.
  5. Caraher, M. and Dowler, E. (2014). Food for Poorer People: Conventional and 'Alternative' Transgressions. In Goodman M, and Sage C, (Eds.), Food Transgressions
    Making Sense of Contemporary Food Politics
    (pp. 227–246). Farnham Surrey: Ashgate ISBN 978-0-7546-7970-7.
  6. Lang, T.M. and Caraher, M. (2013). Influencing international policy. In Guest, C., Ricciardi, W., Kawachi, I. and Lang, I. (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Public Health Practice Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-958630-1.
  7. Machell, G. and Caraher, M. (2012). The role of municipal markets in urban food strategies: a case study. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning: evolving theory and practice (pp. 125–133). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  8. Bock, B.B. and Caraher, M. (2012). Integrating health, environment and society-introducing a new arena. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning: Evolving Theory and Practice (pp. 173–180). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  9. Caraher, M. and Machell, G. (2012). Defining food co-ops. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning (pp. 223–232). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  10. Caraher, M. and Machell, G. (2012). Defining food co-ops. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning: evolving theory and practice (pp. 221–229). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  11. Bock, B.B. and Caraher, M. (2012). Integrating health, environment and society- introducing a new agenda. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning: evolving theory and practice (pp. 171–178). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  12. Caraher, M. and Machell, G. (2012). Defining food co-ops. In Viljoen, A.M. and Wiskerke, J.S.C. (Eds.), Sustainable Food Planning (pp. 223–232). Wageningen Academic Pub. ISBN 978-90-8686-187-3.
  13. Lang, T.M., Caraher, M. and Wu, M. (2010). Meat and Policy: Charting a Course Through the Complexity. In D'Silva, J. and Webster, J. (Eds.), The Meat Crisis Earthscan / James & James. ISBN 978-1-84407-903-2.
  14. Lang, T.M., Caraher, M. and Wu, M. (2010). Meat and Policy: Charting a Course through the Complexity. In d'Silva, J. and Webster, J. (Eds.), The Meat Crisis: Developing More Sustainable Production and Consumption Earthscan.
  15. Caraher, M., Lang, T. and Wu, M. (2010). Meat and Policy: Charting a Course through the Complexity. In Webster, J. and D'Silva, J. (Eds.), The Meat Crisis: Developing More Sustainable Production and Consumption (pp. 254–274). Earthscan / James & James. ISBN 978-1-84407-902-5.
  16. Caraher, M., Cowburn, G. and Coveney, J. (2008). Project Management. In Lawrence, M. and Worsley, T. (Eds.), Public health nutrition (pp. 389–421). ISBN 978-1-74175-102-4.
  17. Caraher, M. (2008). Sustainability- considering the pillars of sustainability as a theoretical paradigm. In Pendergast D (Ed) Home economics: referencing the past; creating the future. Proceedings of the XXI International Federation for Home Economics World Congress, July 26-31, 2008, Lucerne, Switzerland. In Congress, I.F.F.H.E.W., Economics, I.F.F.H. and Association, I.F.F.H.E.W.C.S. (Eds.), Home economics: referencing the past; creating the future. Proceedings of the XXI International Federation for Home Economics World Congress, July 26-31, 2008, Lucerne, Switzerland (pp. 55–66). Switzerland: IFHE Switzerland. ISBN 978-3-9812393-1-7.
  18. Caraher, M. and Dowler, E. (2007). Inequalities in Food and nutrition; Challenging; Lifestyles. In Dowler, E. (Ed.), Challenging health inequalities (pp. 127–155). Policy Pr. ISBN 978-1-86134-899-9.
  19. Caraher, M. and Carr-Hill, R. (2007). Taxation and public health: 'Sin taxes' or structured approaches. In Galea, S. (Ed.), Macrosocial determinants of population health (pp. 211–232). Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-0-387-70811-9.
  20. Caraher, M. and Drummond, C. (2007). The Imperative for Consultation and Involvement in Child Nutrition Research: Adding Perspectives from Qualitative Research. In Child Nutrition Research Advances. In Carter, L.V. (Ed.), Child nutrition research advances (pp. 111–130). Nova Science Pub Inc. ISBN 978-1-60021-849-1.
  21. Caraher, M. and Landon, J. (2006). The Impact of Advertising on Food Choice: The Social Context of Advertising. In Shepherd, R. and Raats, M. (Eds.), The psychology of food choice (pp. 227–245). CABI. ISBN 978-0-85199-032-3.
  22. Caraher, M. and Lang, T. (2005). Food, Health and Globalisation: Is Health Promotion Still Relevant? In Scriven, A. and Garman, S. (Eds.), Promoting health (pp. 90–105). ISBN 978-1-4039-2137-6.
  23. Caraher, M. (2002). Food and health: national and international policy perspectives. In Adams, L. and Amos, M. (Eds.), Promoting Health: Politics and Practice (pp. 46–51). Sage Publications Ltd. ISBN 978-0-7619-6833-7.
  24. Barling, D., Lang T, and Caraher, M. (2002). Food, Social Policy and the Environment: Towards a New Model. In Cahill, M. and Fitzpatrick, T. (Eds.), Environmental issues and social welfare (pp. 70–90). Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-0-631-23552-1.
  25. lang T, and Caraher, M. (2001). International Public Health. In Pencheon, D. and Melzer, (Eds.), Oxford Textbook of Public Health (pp. 168–176). Oxford:: Oxford University Press,.
  26. Caraher, M. Food habits and nutrition globalization and its implications in 'Culinary Arts and Sciences: global, local and national perspectives' . In Rodrigues, S., Marques, H. and Dias, F.D. (Eds.), Culinary Arts and Sciences: global, local and national perspectives (pp. 18–21). Porto Portugal: Association of Portuguese Nutritionists. ISBN 978-989-8631-08-4.

Journal Articles (109)

  1. Lavelle, F., Hollywood, L., Caraher, M., McGowan, L., Spence, M., Surgenor, D., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Raats, M. and Dean, M. (2017). Increasing intention to cook from basic ingredients: A randomised controlled study. Appetite, 116, pp. 502–510. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2017.05.024.
  2. McGowan, L., Caraher, M., Raats, M., Lavelle, F., Hollywood, L., McDowell, D., Spence, M., McCloat, A., Mooney, E. and Dean, M. (2017). Domestic cooking and food skills: A review. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 57(11), pp. 2412–2431. doi:10.1080/10408398.2015.1072495.
  3. Hollywood, L., Surgenor, D., Reiks, M., McGowan, L., Lavelle, F., Spence, M., Raats, M., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Caraher, M. and Dean, M. (2017). Identification of Behaviour Change Techniques applied in interventions to improve Cooking Skills and Food Skills among adults. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition p. 0. doi:10.1080/10408398.2017.1344613.
  4. Surgenor, D., Hollywood, L., Furey, S., Lavelle, F., McGowan, L., Spence, M., Raats, M., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Caraher, M. and Dean, M. (2017). The impact of video technology on learning: A cooking skills experiment. Appetite, 114, pp. 306–312. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2017.03.037.
  5. Caraher, M., Begley, A. and Allirot, X. (2017). Guest editorial. British Food Journal, 119(5), pp. 970–972. doi:10.1108/BFJ-03-2017-0123.
  6. Reed, K., Collier, R., White, R., Wells, R., Ingram, J., Borelli, R., Haesler, B., Caraher, M., Lang, T., Arnall, A., Ajates Gonzalez, R., Pope, H., Blake, L. and Sykes, R. (2017). Training Future Actors in the Food System: A new collaborative cross-institutional, interdisciplinary training programme for students. Exchanges: the Warwick Research Journal, 4(2), pp. 201–218.
  7. Caraher, M. and McCloat, A. (2017). Home Economics as a food education intervention: lessons from the Irish secondary education context. Education and Health, Vol.34(No.4, 2016), pp. 104–110.
  8. Caraher, M. and Perry, I. (2017). Sugar, salt, and the limits of self regulation in the food industry. BMJ (Online), 357 . doi:10.1136/bmj.j1709.
  9. Lavelle, F., McGowan, L., Spence, M., Caraher, M., Raats, M.M., Hollywood, L., McDowell, D., McCloat, A., Mooney, E. and Dean, M. (2016). Barriers and facilitators to cooking from ‘scratch’ using basic or raw ingredients: A qualitative interview study. Appetite, 107, pp. 383–391. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.115.
  10. Lavelle, F., Spence, M., Hollywood, L., McGowan, L., Surgenor, D., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Caraher, M., Raats, M. and Dean, M. (2016). Learning cooking skills at different ages: A cross-sectional study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13(1) . doi:10.1186/s12966-016-0446-y.
  11. McGowan, L., Pot, G.K., Stephen, A.M., Lavelle, F., Spence, M., Raats, M., Hollywood, L., McDowell, D., McCloat, A., Mooney, E., Caraher, M. and Dean, M. (2016). The influence of socio-demographic, psychological and knowledge-related variables alongside perceived cooking and food skills abilities in the prediction of diet quality in adults: A nationally representative cross-sectional study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13(1) . doi:10.1186/s12966-016-0440-4.
  12. Lindberg, R., Caraher, M. and Wingrove, K. (2016). Implementing the right to food in Australia. Victorian Journal of Home Economics, 55(2), pp. 25–29.
  13. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S., Mansfield, M., Alp, C., Brewster, Z. and Gresham, J. (2016). Secondary school pupils' food choices around schools in a London borough: Fast food and walls of crisps. Appetite, 103, pp. 208–220. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.04.016.
  14. Lindberg, R., Lawrence, M. and Caraher, M. (2016). Kitchens and Pantries—Helping or Hindering? The Perspectives of Emergency Food Users in Victoria, Australia. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, 1932-0256 (Online), pp. 1–19. doi:10.1080/19320248.2016.1175397.
  15. Pollard, C., Booth, S., Begley, A., Kerr, D., Mackintosh, B., Janice, J., Campbell, C., Whelan, J., Milligan, R., Berg, J., Fisher, B. and Caraher, M. (2016). Working in Partnership with the Charitable Food Sector to Better Meet the Food Needs of People in Perth. Parity, 29(2), pp. 39–40.
  16. Lindberg R, , Rose, N. and Caraher, M. (2016). The Human Right to Food. Parity, 29(2), pp. 13–15.
  17. Santos, S., Vilela, S., Padrão, P. and Caraher, M. (2015). Sex-related dietary changes of Portuguese university students after migration to London, UK. Nutrition and Dietetics, 72(4), pp. 340–346. doi:10.1111/1747-0080.12154.
  18. Caraher, M. (2015). The European union food distribution programme for the most deprived persons of the community, 1987-2013: From agricultural policy to social inclusion policy? Health Policy, 119(7), pp. 932–940. doi:10.1016/j.healthpol.2015.05.001.
  19. Carey, R., Caraher, M., Lawrence, M. and Friel, S. (2015). Opportunities and challenges in developing a whole-of-government national food and nutrition policy: lessons from Australia’s National Food Plan. Public Health Nutrition, 19(1), pp. 3–14. doi:10.1017/S1368980015001834.
  20. Caraher, M., Smith, J. and Machell, G. (2015). To co-op or not to co-op: a case study of food co-ops in England. Journal of Co-operative Studies, 47(2), pp. 6–19.
  21. Panjwani, C. and Caraher, M. (2015). Response to Petticrew and colleagues. Health Policy, 119(1), pp. 98–99. doi:10.1016/j.healthpol.2014.08.008.
  22. Caraher, M. and Cowburn, G. (2015). Guest Commentary: Fat and other taxes, lessons for the implementation of preventive policies. Preventive Medicine, 77, pp. 204–206. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.05.006.
  23. (2014). Old crises on new plates or old plates for a new crises? Food banks and food insecurity. British Food Journal, 116(9) . doi:10.1108/BFJ-08-2014-0285.
  24. Caraher, M. (2014). The European Union Food Distribution programme for the Most Deprived Persons of the community, 1987-2013: From agricultural policy to social inclusion policy? Health Policy . doi:10.1016/j.healthpol.2015.05.001.
  25. Gatley, A., Caraher, M. and Lang, T. (2014). A qualitative, cross cultural examination of attitudes and behaviour in relation to cooking habits in France and Britain. Appetite, 75, pp. 71–81. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2013.12.014.
  26. Verstraeten, R., Caraher, M., Raats, K., Penalvo, J.L., Gomes, F., Miller, R. and Matthys, C. (2014). Creative thinking as an innovative approach to tackle nutrition in times of economic crises. Nutrition Bulletin, 39(1), pp. 132–136. doi:10.1111/nbu.12078.
  27. Panjwani, C. and Caraher, M. (2014). The Public Health Responsibility Deal: Brokering a deal for public health, but on whose terms? Health Policy, 114(2-3), pp. 163–173. doi:10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.11.002.
  28. Caraher, M. (2014). Cooking crisis: What crisis? The IFAVA Scientific Newsletter, (86 Feb 2014), pp. 4–4.
  29. Kapetanaki, A.B., Brennan, D.R. and Caraher, M. (2014). Social marketing and healthy eating: findings from young people in Greece. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, 11(2), pp. 161–180. doi:10.1007/s12208-013-0112-x.
  30. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S. and Madelin, T. (2014). The "School Foodshed": Schools and fast-food outlets in a London borough. British Food Journal, 116(3), pp. 472–493.
  31. Vilela, S., Santos, S., Padrão, P. and Caraher, M. (2014). Length of Migration and Eating Habits of Portuguese University Students Living in London, United Kingdom. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, 53(4), pp. 419–435. doi:10.1080/03670244.2013.834818.
  32. Seed, B.A., Lang, T.M., Caraher, M.J. and Ostry, A.S. (2014). Exploring Public Health’s roles and limitations in advancing food security in British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 105(5), pp. e324–e329.
  33. Wilson, A.M., Henderson, J., Coveney, J., Meyer, S.B., Webb, T., Calnan, M., Caraher, M., Lloyd, S., McCullum, D., Elliott, A. and Ward, P.R. (2014). Media actors' perceptions of their roles in reporting food incidents. BMC Public Health, 14(1) . doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-1305.
  34. Wells, R. and Caraher, M. (2014). UK print media coverage of the food bank phenomenon: From food welfare to food charity? British Food Journal, 116(9), pp. 1426–1445. doi:10.1108/BFJ-03-2014-0123.
  35. Lawrence, M., Burlingame, B., Caraher, M., Holdsworth, M., Neff, R. and Timotijevic, L. (2014). Public health nutrition and sustainability. Public Health Nutrition, 18(13), pp. 2287–2292. doi:10.1017/S1368980015002402.
  36. Wilson, A., Coveney, J., Henderson, J., Meyer, S., Calnan, M., Caraher, M., Webb, T., Elliott, A. and Ward, P. (2013). Trust makers, breakers and brokers: Building trust in the Australian food system. BMC Public Health, 13(1) . doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-229.
  37. Cairns, G., Angus, K., Hastings, G. and Caraher, M. (2013). Systematic reviews of the evidence on the nature, extent and effects of food marketing to children. A retrospective summary. Appetite, 62, pp. 209–215. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.04.017.
  38. Caraher, M., Seeley A, , Wu M, and Lloyd S, (2013). When chefs adopt a school? an evaluation of a cooking intervention in English primary schools. Appetite, 62, pp. 50–59. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.11.007.
  39. Caraher, M., Carey, R., McConell, K. and Lawrence, M. (2013). Food Policy Development in the Australian State of Victoria: A Case Study of the Food Alliance. International Planning Studies, 18(1), pp. 78–95. doi:10.1080/13563475.2013.750939.
  40. Caraher, M., O'Keefe, E., Lloyd, S. and Madelin, T. (2013). The planning system and fast food outlets in London: lessons for health promotion practice. Revista Portuguesa de Saude Publica, 31(1), pp. 49–57.
  41. Seed, B., Lang, T.M., Caraher, M. and Ostry, A. (2013). Integrating Community Food Security into Public Health and Provincial Government Departments in British Columbia, Canada. Agriculture and Human Values, 30(3), pp. 457–470. doi:10.1007/s10460-013-9426-x.
  42. Caraher, M. (2013). A global perspective: towards a healthy, fair and sustainable food system. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia, 20(3), pp. 9–12.
  43. Cairns, G., Angus, K., Hastings, G. and Caraher, M. (2012). Systematic reviews of the evidence on the nature, extent and effects of food marketing to children. A retrospective summary. Appetite .
  44. Lloyd, S., Lawton, J., Caraher, M., Singh, G., Horsley, K. and Mussa, F. (2011). A tale of two localities: Healthy Eating on a restricted income. Health Education Journal . doi:10.1177/0017896910364837.
  45. Caraher, M. and Carey, D. (2011). Issues On Food Sustainability
    In Australia – Part 2.
    Nutridate, 22(2), pp. 2–5.
  46. Caraher, M. (2011). Food Austerity: a lifestyle choice for whom! Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia., 18(2), pp. 17–25.
  47. Caraher, M. and Carey, D. (2011). Issues On Food
    Sustainability
    In Australia – Part 2.
    Nutridate, 22(2), pp. 2–5.
  48. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S., Lawton, J., Singh, G., Horsley, K. and Mussa, F. (2010). A tale of two cities: A study of access to food, lessons for public health practice. Health Education Journal, 69(2), pp. 200–210. doi:10.1177/0017896910364834.
  49. Caraher, M. (2010). Food and Fairness through ecological public health? A critical analysis. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia, 16(2), pp. 2–6.
  50. Caraher, M. and Seeley, A. (2010). Cooking in schools: Lessons from the UK ċ. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia, 17(1), pp. 2–9.
  51. Caraher, M., Wu, M. and Seeley, A. (2010). Should we teach cooking in schools? A systematic review of the literature of school-based cooking interventions. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia, 17(1), pp. 10–19.
  52. Caraher, M. and Carey, D. (2010). Issues On Food Sustainability in Australia. Nutridate, 21(4), pp. 2–6.
  53. Bowyer, S., Caraher, M., Eilbert, K. and Carr-Hill, R. (2009). Shopping for food: Lessons from a London borough. British Food Journal, 111(5), pp. 452–474. doi:10.1108/00070700910957294.
  54. Caraher, M. (2008). Food and health promotion: Lessons from the field. Health Education Journal, 67(1), pp. 3–8. doi:10.1177/0017896907086155.
  55. Caraher, M. (2008). Sustainability-considering the pillars of sustainability as a theoretical paradigm. Victorian Journal of Home Economics, 47(2), pp. 25–32.
  56. Caraher, M. and Dowler, E. (2007). Food projects in London: Lessons for policy and practice - A hidden sector and the need for 'more unhealthy puddings ... sometimes'. Health Education Journal, 66(2), pp. 188–205. doi:10.1177/0017896907076762.
  57. Wrieden, W.L., Anderson, A.S., Longbottom, P.J., Valentine, K., Stead, M., Caraher, M., Lang, T., Gray, B. and Dowler, E. (2007). The impact of a community-based food skills intervention on cooking confidence, food preparation methods and dietary choices - An exploratory trial. Public Health Nutrition, 10(2), pp. 203–211. doi:10.1017/S1368980007246658.
  58. Rodrigues, S.S.P., Caraher, M., Trichopoulou, A. and de Almeida, M.D.V. (2007). Portuguese Households’ Diet-quality – adherence to Mediterranean food pattern and compliance with WHO population dietary goals. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 62(2), pp. 1263–1272. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602852.
  59. Caraher, M., Landon, J. and Dalmeny, K. (2006). Television advertising and children: lessons from policy development. Public Health Nutr, 9(5), pp. 596–605.
  60. Caraher, M. and Cowburn, G. (2005). Taxing food: implications for public health nutrition. Public Health Nutr, 8(8), pp. 1242–1249.
  61. Caraher, M. and Reynolds, J. (2005). Lessons for home economics: pedagogy and practice. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia., 12(2), pp. 2–15.
  62. Caraher, M. and Cowburn, G. (2004). A survey of food projects in the English NHS regions and Health Action Zones in 2001. Health Education Journal, 63(3), pp. 197–219. doi:10.1177/001789690406300302.
  63. Caraher, M. and Coveney, J. (2004). Public health nutrition and food policy. Public Health Nutr, 7(5), pp. 591–598. doi:10.1079/PHN2003575.
  64. Caraher, M., Baker, H. and Burns, M. (2004). Children's views of cooking and food preparation. British Food Journal, 106(4), pp. 255–273. doi:10.1108/00070700410529537.
  65. Stead, M., Caraher, M., Wrieden, W., Longbottom, P., Valentine, K. and Anderson, A. (2004). Confident, fearful and hopeless cooks: Findings from the development of a food-skills initiative. British Food Journal, 106(4), pp. 274–287. doi:10.1108/00070700410529546.
  66. Dowler, E. and Caraher, M. (2003). Local Food Projects: The New Philanthropy? Political Quarterly, 74(1), pp. 57–65+141.
  67. Barling, D., Lang, T. and Caraher, M. (2002). Joined-up food policy? The trials of governance, public policy and the food system. Social Policy and Administration, 36(6), pp. 556–574.
  68. Caraher, M., Dixon, P., Carr-Hill, R., Hayton, P., McGough, H. and Bird, L. (2002). Are health-promoting prisons an impossibility? Lessons from England and Wales. Health Education, 102(5), pp. 219–229. doi:10.1108/09654280210444092.
  69. Robinson, N., Caraher, M., Price, D., Burley, D., Mears, S. and Pratt, R. (2001). Public health training: A key element of nursing education. Public Health Medicine, 3(2), pp. 57–61.
  70. Lang, T., Barling, D. and Caraher, M. (2001). Food, social policy and the environment: Towards a new model. Social Policy and Administration, 35(5), pp. 538–558.
  71. Caraher, M. and Baker, H. (2001). Designing an Information Leaflet: Using consumer-oriented research to inform the development of a drug resource for children. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 8(3), pp. 243–260. doi:10.1080/09687630123975.
  72. Lang, T. and Caraher, M. (2001). Is there a culinary skills transition?: data and debate from the UK about changes in cooking culture. Journal of the Home Economics Institute of Australia, 8, 2, 2-14., 8(2), pp. 2–14.
  73. Robinson, N., Caraher, M., Price D, , Burely, D., Mears, S. and Pratt, R. (2001). Public Health training: A key element of nursing education. Public Health Medicine, 3(2), pp. 57–61.
  74. Caraher, M. (2001). Designing an Information Leaflet: using consumer-oriented research to inform the development of a drug resource for children. Drugs: education, prevention and policy, 8(3), pp. 243–260.
  75. Caraher, M., Bird, L. and Hayton, P. (2000). Evaluation of a campaign to promote mental health in young offender institutions: Problems and lessons for future practice. Health Education Journal, 59(3), pp. 211–227.
  76. Robinson, N., Caraher, M. and Lang, T. (2000). Access to shops: The views of low-income shoppers. Health Education Journal, 59(2), pp. 121–136. doi:10.1177/001789690005900202.
  77. Caraher, M. (2000). Food policy and public health: a role for community nursing? Community Practitioner, 73, (1): 429-431. Community Practitioner, 73, (1): 429-431., 73(1), pp. 429–431.
  78. Caraher, M., Lang, T. and Dixon, P. (2000). The influence of TV and Celebrity Chefs on public attitudes and behaviour among the English public. Association for the Study of Food in Society Journal, 4(1), pp. 27–46.
  79. Caraher, M., Hayton, P. and Bird L, (2000). Promoting mental health in YOIs. he Prison Service, (No 128), pp. 7–12.
  80. Fox, P., Bird, L., Baker, H. and Caraher, M. (2000). Promoting Mental Health Among Students in Higher Education in England: the Views and Attitudes of Students and Staff. International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 2(4), pp. 35–44.
  81. Caraher, M. (2000). Evaluation of a campaign to promote mental health in young offender institutions: Problems and lessons for future practice. Health Education Journal, 59, pp. 211–227.
  82. Molly, J. and Caraher, M. (2000). Public Health and the Role of the Nurse: Degrees of Public Health and the need for education and training. BJCN, 5(90), pp. 431–435.
  83. Caraher, M. and Lang, T. (1999). Can't cook, won't cook: A review of cooking skills and their relevance to health promotion. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 37(3), pp. 89–100.
  84. Caraher, M., Lang, T., Dixon, P. and Carr-Hill, R. (1999). The state of cooking in England: The relationship of cooking skills to food choice. British Food Journal., 101(8), pp. 590–609.
  85. Caraher, M. and Lang, T. (1999). Can’t cook, Won’t cook: a review of cooking skills and their relevance to health promotion. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 37(3), pp. 89–100.
  86. Bird, L., Hayton, P., Caraher, M., McGough, H. and Tobutt, C. (1999). Mental Health Promotion and Prison Health Care Staff in Young Offenders Institutions in England. The International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 1(4), pp. 16–24.
  87. Caraher, M. and Allen, D. (1999). District nurses and the new public health agenda. Primary Nursing Care Magazine, November, pp. 18–20.
  88. Caraher, M. (1999). Market Economy. Streetwise, 10(2), pp. 26–27.
  89. Lang, T. and Caraher, M. (1998). Access to healthy foods: Part II. Food poverty and shopping deserts: What are the implications for health promotion policy and practice? Health Education Journal, 57(3), pp. 202–211.
  90. Caraher, M., Dixon, P., Lang, T. and Carr-Hill, R. (1998). Access to healthy foods: Part I. Barriers to accessing healthy foods: Differentials by gender, social class, income and mode of transport. Health Education Journal, 57(3), pp. 191–201.
  91. Caraher, M. (1998). Patient education and health promotion: clinical health promotion--the conceptual link. Patient Educ Couns, 33(1), pp. 49–58.
  92. Caraher, M. (1998). Rejoined to Professor van Eijk. Patient Education and Counseling, 33(1), pp. 63–65. doi:10.1016/S0738-3991(97)00078-5.
  93. Caraher, M. (1998). Patient education and health promotion: clinical health promotion the conceptual link. Patient Education and Counselling, 33(1), pp. 49–58.
  94. Caraher, M. (1998). Rejoinder to van Eijk. Patient Education and Counselling, 33(1), pp. 63–65.
  95. Lang T, and Caraher, M. (1998). Food poverty and shopping deserts: What are the implications for health promotion policy and practice. Health Education Journal, 58(3), pp. 202–211.
  96. Caraher, M., Dixon, P., Lang T, and Carr-Hill, R. (1998). Barriers to accessing healthy foods: differentials by gender, social class, income and mode of transport. Health Education Journal, 57(3), pp. 191–201.
  97. Caraher, M. and McNab, M. (1997). Public Health Nursing: An alternative viewpoint. Health Visitor, 70(3), pp. 105–106.
  98. Caraher, M. and McNab, M. (1997). Using lessons from health visiting’s past to inform the public health role. Health Visitor, 70(10), pp. 380–383.
  99. Caraher, M. (1996). The Public Health Nursing Role: an overview of future trends. Nursing Standard, 11(51), pp. 44–48.
  100. Caraher, M. (1995). Assembly line health promotion an analysis of change occurring in the delivery of health promotion services in England. The Journal of Contemporary Health, 1(2), pp. 53–58.
  101. Caraher, M. (1995). Nursing and health education: victim blaming. British Journal of Nursing, 4(20), pp. 1190–1213. doi:10.12968/bjon.1995.4.20.1190.
  102. Caraher, M. (1995). Nursing and health education: victim blaming. British Journal of Nursing, 4(20)(20), pp. :1190-2, 1209-13.–:1190-2, 1209-13..
  103. Caraher, M. (1994). A sociological approach to health promotion for nurses in an institutional setting. J Adv Nurs, 20(3), pp. 544–551.
  104. Caraher, M. (1994). Nursing and health promotion practice: the creation of victims and winners in a political context. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(3), pp. 465–468. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.1994.tb01108.x.
  105. Caraher, M. (1994). A single voice for public health: One for all and all for one. Public Health Forum, 2(3), pp. 7–7.
  106. Caraher, M. (1994). A sociological approach to health promotion for nurses in an institutional setting.
    Journal of Advanced Nursing 10/1994 20(3):544-51.
    Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 20(3), pp. 544–551.
  107. Caraher, M. (1994). Health promotion: time for an audit. Nursing Standard, 8(20), pp. 32–35.
  108. Caraher, M. (1994). Nursing and health promotion practice, the creation of victims and winners in a political context. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(3), pp. 465–468.
  109. Caraher M, (1994). Nursing and health promotion practice: the creation of victims and winners in a political context. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(3), pp. 465–468.

Reports (16)

  1. Caraher, M. and LLoyd, S. (2010). Fish and chips with a side order of Trans fat: The nutrition implications of eating from fastfood outlets: a report on eating out in eastLondon.. ISBN 978-1-900804-42-4.
  2. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S. and Madelin, T. (2009). The School Foodshed: Fast food and schools. Centre for Food Policy, City University. ISBN 978-1-900804-45-5.
  3. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S. and Madelin, T. (2009). Cheap as Chicken: Fast Food Outlets in Tower Hamlets. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London.: Centre for Food Policy, City University; London..
  4. Caraher, M., Wu, M. and Seeley, A. (2009). ACA Chefs Adopt a School: An evaluation. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London: Centre for Food Policy, City University; London. ISBN 978-1-900804-43-1.
  5. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S. and Crawley, H. (2009). Nutrition policy in the four administrative areas of the UK. CWT; London..
  6. Caraher, M., Lloyd, S. and Horsley, (2008). A Tale of two Cities; Food access in Preston. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London..
  7. Caraher, M., Wu, M. and Seeley, A. (2008). A moveable feast Evidence for school based cooking interventions to improve children’s food behaviours and diets. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London.: Centre for Food Policy, City University; London..
  8. Caraher, M. and Richards, L. (2007). An Evaluation of the Community Nutrition Assistant Training Programme Camden. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London..
  9. Caraher, M., Dass, S. and Berggreen, A. (2007). An Evaluation of the Shoreditch Spa Healthy Eating Programme. Shoreditch Spa; London. Shoreditch Spa; London/Centre for Food Policy, City University; London.: Shoreditch Spa; London/Centre for Food Policy, City University; London..
  10. Caraher, M., Davis, L. and Barry, V. (2006). Neighbourhood Renewal Fund ‘Eatwell in Sandwell’ 2004-6: Successes, challenges, learning outcomes and opportunities. Final Evaluation Report June 2006. Ital Associates; Oxford/ Centre for Food Policy, City University, London..
  11. Caraher, M., Bowyer, S., Duane, T. and Carr-Hill, R. (2006). Shopping for Food: Accessing healthy affordable food in three areas of Hackney. Centre for Food Policy, City University; London.. ISBN 978-1-900804-44-8.
  12. Davis, L. and Caraher, M. (2006). Evaluation of the Islington Neighbourhood Renewal Fund Staying alive Project 2004-2006. Final report, June 2006. London: City University.: London: City University..
  13. Davis, L., Caraher, M. and Measures, M. (2005). Growing a Healthy Food Economy: Linking Producers with Public Sector Purchasers. Hereford: Bulmer Foundation: Bulmer Foundation.
  14. Hastings, G., Stead, M., MCDermott, L., MAcKintosh, A., Rayner, M. and Caraher, M. (2003). Review of the research on the effects of food promotion to children. Glasgow: Centre for Social Marketing. Glasgow: Glasgow: Centre for Social Marketing..
  15. Caraher, M. (2003). TV advertising and children: A policy analysis..
  16. Caraher, M. and Wu, M. Evaluation of
    Good Food Training for London Final Report
    December 2009.
    Centre for Food Policy School of Community and Health Sciences City University London. ISBN 978-1-900804-41-7.

Other Activities

Editorial Activities (5)

  1. Public Health Nutrition
    Special Issue On: Sustainability and Public Health Nutrition
    Submission Due Date: 15 March 2014
    Full Details at: http://journals.cambridge.org/images/fileUpload/images/PHN_call_for_papers_nov13.pdf
    Guest Editors: Associate Professor Mark Lawrence, Dr Barbara Burlingame, Prof Colin D Butler, Prof Martin Caraher, Prof Michelle Holdsworth, Dr Roni Neff, Dr Lada Timotijevic,

    Public Health Nutrition (PHN) seeks original manuscripts for a Special Issue on “Sustainability and Public Health Nutrition” scheduled to appear in 2015. By the year 2050, our global agricultural and food systems will need to be able to produce enough to feed 9-10 billion people. Besides its negative environmental effects, continuing our current systems of food production, distribution, and consumption will likely have measurable, negative consequences on food insecurity, hunger, malnutrition, nutrient deficiencies, and obesity. Although the magnitude of its health impact remains uncertain, it will likely affect the frequency and severity of health risks, especially in developing countries and in vulnerable populations internationally. Changing our food systems towards sustainability while also meeting food demands will require a shared understanding of current status and trends, and collaborative efforts involving the public and private sectors, community participation, and researchers across multiple disciplines.
    .
  2. Editorial Board Anthropology of Food
    www.revues.org/aof
    .
  3. Editorial Board International Journal of Consumer Studies.
  4. Section EDITOR ON JOINT PUBLICATION with Betina Bock

    Title: Planning for sustainable food systems.
    Editors: Andre Viljoen & Han Wisekerke
    Publishers: Wageningen Academic Publishers
    Publication: due late summer 2011.
    .
  5. Guest Editors British Food Journal Special Edition

    Professor Martin Caraher
    Centre for Food Policy, City University London. email m.caraher@city.ac.uk

    Professor Alessio Cavicchi, Department of Education, Cultural Heritage and Tourism, University of Macerata, Italy email a.cavicchi@unimc.it
    pp 1386-1391
    Food aid and providing for the most disadvantaged in society has been a feature of communities since societies came together. In the great depression of the 1920/30s food banks became a means of delivering food to the many who were destitute and without work. Post WWII saw the emergence of nation states where social solidarity was embedded in welfare and rights and there was move away from food charity or philanthropy and the concept of the undeserving poor. During this time food banks reverted to an emergency food role filling in gaps and faults in state provision, often distributing to those who fell outside the formal welfare system such as the homeless and illegal immigrants. However, since the 2007 global economic crises we have seen the reemergence of food banks as a way of providing aid in society ,no longer merely filling gaps but becoming the main providers of food for an increasing number in society, and is related to:
    • The withdrawal by the state from food welfare as a means of cost saving;
    • The need for emergency and quick responses.
    Other relevant issues include the realization of the amount of waste in the food system with food banks and food pantries being seen as acceptable ways of redistributing this food as well as the development of the “foodbank plus model”

    .
    Call for papers
    The guest editors of this Special Issue are seeking contributions from across the spectrum of food aid and emergency food responses research. We are interested in both empirical research articles as well as conceptual pieces. In this regard we welcome papers covering (but not limited to) the following topics:

    • What is/ are food banks? What are the core or common components of a food bank, are there cultural differences within and between countries? How do different structures, models of provision and countries compare?
    • Tensions and collaborations between food banks and intergovernmental organizations
    • What is the evidence that food banks address:
    o food insecurity or
    o increase dependence and widen inequality and food insecurity?
    • Examples of faith based food welfare provision/non denominational food provision.
    • What are the views/opinions of food bank users?
    • Who are the users of food banks? Are there new groups of users and what are their attitudes to food banks ?
    • What do we know about the attitudes and views of those running food banks including volunteers?
    • What is the evidence for the impact of food banks on the health and diet of users/recipients
    • Lessons for the developed world from the developing world, eg the peasant and landless movements role in tackling food insecurity.
    • What does ‘food bank plus’’ look like, are there merging example of food aid which offer new and innovative solutions to simply providing those in need with food.
    • How food banks relate to orthodox models of food retailing eg in economic or food safety terms
    • How the collaboration with food banks (sponsorships, donations, etc…) can affect image, reputation and CSR of agro-food firms and retailers? Is this collaboration perceived as a source of competitive advantage?

    Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method studies are welcomed as well as conceptual or policy based discussions on the role, place and future look of food banks.


    Submission instructions

    • Manuscripts should be between 3,000 and 6,000 words and formatted according to the journal author guidelines.
    • Submissions must be received by 1st February 2014 via the online submission system Scholar One Manuscripts:
    • Authors should indicate that the manuscript is for this special issue by selecting this from the dropdown list on Scholar One Manuscripts.

    For further information

    Please see the journal homepage: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bfj or contact the guest editors.
    .

Media Appearances (2)

  1. The Next Station Martin Caraher - Food security. 01.03.13 The Next Station http://www.nextstation.com.au/food-security-depends-on-keeping-it-local/ Martin Caraher - Food security
  2. Who's feeding Ireland. TV prog on RTÉ as commentator

Radio Programmes (3)

  1. Drivetime radio. RET 1 Advertising to children
  2. R. BBC world service Food waste
    Between 6 and 7 tonight Martin will be representing City on the BBC World Service (radio) discussing this issue,
  3. Morning Ireland. RTÉ 2 INTERVIEW ON FOOD POVERTY IN IRELAND

Television Programmes (3)

  1. What's Ireland Eating? presented by Philip Boucher Hayes. RTE one
  2. BBC News. BBC News Food waste
  3. The EU MDP Proggramme. Numerous European ones Interview headshot as commentator on the MDP programme

Find us

City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

Back to top

City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.