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Contact

Visit James Hampton

D406, Rhind Building

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Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Overview

After studying Natural Sciences at Cambridge, Professor Hampton took his PhD in Psychology at University College London before moving to City University London in 1977. Since then he has had Visiting Appointments in the USA at Stanford, Cornell, Chicago, Yale and New York Universities.

His research interests have broadly concerned the interface between psychology, philosophy and linguistics as applied to the problem of concepts and word meaning.

Professor Hampton has championed a view of concepts known as the Prototype Model, according to which people represent concepts by concentrating on clear central examples rather than on the boundary cases between one concept and another.

He has also published a series of studies of Conceptual Combination, in which he showed that the way in which simple logical connectives such as "and", "or" and "not" operate in natural language is only approximately related to their operation in set logic. An explanation is provided by the proposal that when we form a complex concept such as "Bird that is also a Pet", a process is invoked that seeks to integrate the prototype information representing each concept into a single composite.

Qualifications

  1. PhD, University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 1972 – Jul 1976

Employment

  1. External Examiner, University of Glasgow, Sep 2012 – Aug 2016
  2. External Examiner, University of Surrey, Sep 2012 – Aug 2015

Languages

French (can read, write, speak and understand spoken) and Italian (can read, speak and understand spoken).

Research

Professor Hampton's research concerns the psychology of concepts and categorization, including the way in which people understand the world by classifying objects, people, events or situations into different conceptual types or categories, and problems arising from the vagueness of word meanings

Publications

Books (2)

  1. Moss, H. and Hampton, J. (2004). Conceptual Representation. Hove: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-1-84169-958-5.
  2. Mechelen, I.V., Hampton, J.A., Michalski, R.S. and Theuns, P. (1993). Categories and concepts: Theoretical views and inductive data analysis. London: Academic Press.

Chapters (27)

  1. Duran, A.B., Pothos, E.M., Yearsley, J.M., Hampton, J.A., Busemeyer, J.R. and Trueblood, J.S. (2015). Similarity judgments: From classical to complex vector psychological spaces. Contextuality from Quantum Physics to Psychology (pp. 415–448). ISBN 978-981-4730-61-7.
  2. Hampton, J.A. and Jönsson, M.L. (2012). Typicality and compositionality: The logic of combining vague concepts. In Werning, M., Hinzen, W. and Machery, E. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compositionality Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-954107-2.
  3. Hampton, J.A. (2011). Concepts and natural language. In Bělohlávek, R. and Klir, G.J. (Eds.), Concepts and Fuzzy Logic (pp. 233–258). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-01647-6.
  4. Hampton, J.A. (2011). Conceptual combinations and fuzzy logic. In Bělohlávek, R. and Klir, G.J. (Eds.), Concepts and Fuzzy Logic (pp. 209–231). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-01647-6.
  5. Hampton, J.A. (2010). Concepts in human adults. In Mareschal, D., Quinn, P.C. and Lea, S.E.G. (Eds.), The making of human concepts (pp. 293–311). Oxford: Oxford Univ Press. ISBN 978-0-19-954922-1.
  6. Hampton, J.A. (2009). Stability in concepts and evaluating the truth of generic statements. In Pelletier, F.J. (Ed.), Kinds, things and stuff: Concepts of generics and mass terms (pp. 80–99). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-538289-1.
  7. Braisby, N.R., Franks, B. and Hampton, J.A. (2007). Essentialism, word use and concepts. In Hanks, P. (Ed.), Lexicology: Critical concepts in linguistics (pp. 27–68). London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-70098-6.
  8. Gaskell, G. and Hampton, J.A. (2002). A note on styles in accounting. In Douglas, M. (Ed.), Essays in the sociology of perception London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. ISBN 978-0-415-29111-8.
  9. Hampton, J.A. (2001). Prototype representations. Encyclopedia of cognitive science London: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-333-79261-2.
  10. Hampton, J.A. (2001). The role of similarity in natural categorization. In Hahn, U. and Ramscar, M. (Eds.), Similarity and categorization (pp. 13–28). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-850628-7.
  11. Hampton, J.A. (1999). Concepts. In Wilson, R.A. and Keil, F.C. (Eds.), The MIT encyclopedia of the cognitive sciences (pp. 176–179). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-73144-7.
  12. Hampton, J.A. (1998). Between subjects designs. In Nunn, J. (Ed.), Laboratory psychology (pp. 15–38). Hove: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0-86377-711-0.
  13. Hampton, J.A. (1998). Similarity-based categorization and fuzziness of natural categories. In Sloman, S.A. and Rips, L.J. (Eds.), Similarity and symbols in human thinking (pp. 1–79). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-69214-4.
  14. Hampton, J.A. (1998). The role of similarity in how we categorize the world. In Holyoak, K., Gentner, D. and Kokinov, B. (Eds.), Advances in analogy research: Integration of theory and data from the cognitive, comparative and neural sciences Sofia: New Bulgarian University.
  15. Braisby, N., Franks, B. and Hampton, J.A. (1997). Essential contradictions: Psychological essentialism and concepts. In Dubois, D. (Ed.), Catégorisation et cognition: De la perception au discours (pp. 106–128). Paris: Editions Kimé. ISBN 978-2-84174-101-4.
  16. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Conceptual combination. In Lamberts, K. and Shanks, D.R. (Eds.), Knowledge, concepts, and categories (pp. 135–162). Hove: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0-262-62118-2.
  17. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Emergent attributes in combined concepts. In Ward, T.B., Smith, S.M. and Viad, J. (Eds.), Creative thought: An investigation of conceptual structures and processes (pp. 83–110). Washington DC: American Psychological Association Press. ISBN 978-1-55798-404-3.
  18. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Psychological representations of concepts. In Conway, M.A. (Ed.), Cognitive models of memory (pp. 81–110). Hove: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-0-262-53148-1.
  19. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Similarity and categorization. In Ramscar, M., Hahn, U., Cambouropolos, U. and Pain, H. (Eds.), Proceedings of SimCat 1997: An interdisciplinary workshop on similarity and categorisation (pp. 103–109). Edinburgh: Department of Artificial Intelligence, Edinburgh University.
  20. Bowler, D.M., Blacher, D., Nazhat, J. and Hampton, J.A. (1993). The effects of additional cues on children's understanding of false belief. In Rudingher, G., Rietz, C., Kleimas, U. and Meiser, T. (Eds.), Developmental psychology in a changing Europe Bonn: Pace.
  21. Hampton, J.A. (1993). Prototype models of concept representation. In Mechelen, I.V. (Ed.), Categories and concepts: Theoretical views and inductive data analysis (pp. 67–69). London: Academic Press. ISBN 978-0-12-714175-6.
  22. Hampton, J.A. and Dubois, D. (1993). Psychological models of concepts. In Mechelen, I.V. (Ed.), Categories and concepts: Theoretical views and inductive data analysis (pp. 11–34). London: Academic Press. ISBN 978-0-12-714175-6.
  23. Hampton, J.A. (1991). The combination of prototype concepts. In Schwanenflugel, P.J. and Research, U.O.G.I.F.B. (Eds.), The psychology of word meanings Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. ISBN 978-0-8058-0661-8.
  24. Hampton, J.A. (1990). Finding a meaning. In Beaumont, J.G. (Ed.), Brain power Scranton: Harpercollins. ISBN 978-0-06-018197-0.
  25. Hampton, J.A. (1990). Attribute inheritance under negation. In Franks, , Braisby, and Meyer, (Eds.), Proceedings of the first Edinburgh round table on the mental lexicon Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh.
  26. Hampton, J.A. (1987). Principles from language. In Gardiner, M.M. and Christie, B. (Eds.), Applying cognitive psychology to user-interface design London: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-91184-5.
  27. Hampton, J.A. (1982). Giving the Grid/Group dimensions an operational definition. In Douglas, M. (Ed.), Essays in the sociology of perception London: Routledge Kegan & Paul. ISBN 978-0-7100-0881-7.

Conference Papers and Proceedings (7)

  1. Yearsley, J.M., Pothos, E.M., Hampton, J.A. and Duran, A.B. (2015). Towards a quantum probability theory of similarity judgments. .
  2. Heussen, D., Poirier, M., Hampton, J.A. and Aldrovandi, S. (2011). An effect of semantic memory on immediate memory in the visual domain. .
  3. Hampton, J.A., Jönsson, M.L. and Passanisi, A. (2009). The modifier effect: Default inheritance in complex noun phrases. .
  4. Heussen, D., Aldrovandi, S., Kusev, P. and Hampton, J.A. (2009). Explanations of comparative facts: A shift in focus. .
  5. Heussen, D. and Hampton, J.A. (2008). Ways of explaining properties. .
  6. Hampton, J.A. and Heussen, D. (2007). ‘Emeralds are expensive because they are rare’; plausibility of property explanations. .
  7. Hampton, J.A., Francis, D. and Robson, G. (2007). Imagery and the interpretation of ambiguous noun-noun combinations. .

Journal Articles (87)

  1. Barque-Duran, A., Pothos, E.M., Hampton, J.A. and Yearsley, J.M. (2017). Contemporary morality: Moral judgments in digital contexts. Computers in Human Behavior, 75, pp. 184–193. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2017.05.020.
  2. Poirier, M., Heussen, D., Aldrovandi, S., Daniel, L., Tasnim, S. and Hampton, J.A. (2017). Reconstructing the recent visual past: Hierarchical knowledge-based effects in visual working memory. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review pp. 1–11. doi:10.3758/s13423-017-1277-9.
  3. Yearsley, J.M., Barque-Duran, A., Scerrati, E., Hampton, J.A. and Pothos, E.M. (2016). The triangle inequality constraint in similarity judgments. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology . doi:10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2017.03.005.
  4. Hampton, J.A. and Passanisi, A. (2016). When intensions do not map onto extensions: Individual differences in conceptualization. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, 42(4), pp. 505–523. doi:10.1037/xlm0000198.
  5. Barque-Duran, A., Pothos, E.M., Yearsley, J.M. and Hampton, J.A. (2016). Patterns and evolution of moral behaviour: moral dynamics in everyday life. Thinking and Reasoning, 22(1), pp. 31–56. doi:10.1080/13546783.2015.1051585.
  6. Molesworth, C., Chevallier, C., Happe, F. and Hampton, J.A. (2015). Children With Autism Do Not Show Sequence Effects With Auditory Stimuli. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-GENERAL, 144(1), pp. 48–57. doi:10.1037/a0038204.
  7. Pothos, E.M., Barque-Duran, A., Yearsley, J.M., Trueblood, J.S., Busemeyer, J.R. and Hampton, J.A. (2015). Progress and current challenges with the quantum similarity model. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(FEB) . doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00205.
  8. Hampton, J.A. (2014). The inherence heuristic is inherent in humans. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES, 37(5), pp. 490–491. doi:10.1017/S0140525X13003749.
  9. Hampton, J.A. (2014). Conceptual Combination: Extension and Intension. Commentary on Aerts, Gabora, and Sozzo. TOPICS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE, 6(1), pp. 53–57. doi:10.1111/tops.12069.
  10. Hampton, J.A. (2013). Quantum probability and conceptual combination in conjunctions. Behav Brain Sci, 36(3), pp. 290–291. doi:10.1017/S0140525X12002981.
  11. Hampton, J.A. (2012). Thinking Intuitively: The Rich (and at Times Illogical) World of Concepts. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(6), pp. 398–402. doi:10.1177/0963721412457364.
  12. Murphy, G.L., Hampton, J.A. and Milovanovic, G.S. (2012). Semantic memory redux: An experimental test of hierarchical category representation. JOURNAL OF MEMORY AND LANGUAGE, 67(4), pp. 521–539. doi:10.1016/j.jml.2012.07.005.
  13. Hampton, J.A. (2012). Generics as reflecting conceptual knowledge. Special Issue of Recherches Linguistiques de Vincennes, 41, pp. 9–24.
  14. Gibbert, M., Hampton, J.A., Estes, Z. and Mazursky, D. (2012). The Curious Case of the Refrigerator-TV: Similarity and Hybridization. Cognitive Science, 36, pp. 992–1018.
  15. Jönsson, M.L. and Hampton, J.A. (2012). The modifier effect in within-category induction: Default inheritance in complex noun phrases. Language and Cognitive Processes, 27, pp. 90–116.
  16. Hampton, J.A., Aina, B., Andersson, J.M., Mirza, H. and Parmar, S. (2012). The Rumsfeld Effect: the unknown unknown. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory & Cognition, 38, pp. 340–355.
  17. Hampton, J.A., Passanisi, A. and Jonsson, M.L. (2011). The modifier effect and property mutability. J MEM LANG, 64(3), pp. 233–248. doi:10.1016/j.jml.2010.12.001.
  18. Hampton, J.A., Dillane, M., Oren, L. and Worgan, L. (2011). Conjunctions of social categories considered from different points of view. Anthropology and Philosophy, 10, pp. 31–57.
  19. Thompson, E.H. and Hampton, J.A. (2011). The effect of relationship status on communicating emotions through touch. COGNITION EMOTION, 25(2), pp. 295–306. doi:10.1080/02699931.2010.492957.
  20. Heussen, D., Voorspoels, W., Verheyen, S., Storms, G. and Hampton, J.A. (2011). Raising argument strength using negative evidence: A constraint on models of induction. Memory & Cognition, 39, pp. 1496–1507.
  21. Gibbert, M., Hampton, J.A., Estes, Z. and Mazursky, D. (2011). The curious case of the refrigerator-TV: similarity and hybridization. Cognitive Science .
  22. Verheyen, S., Hampton, J.A. and Storms, G. (2010). A probabilistic threshold model: Analyzing semantic categorization data with the Rasch model. ACTA PSYCHOL, 135(2), pp. 216–225. doi:10.1016/j.actpsy.2010.07.002.
  23. Hampton, J.A. (2010). Concept talk cannot be avoided. Behav Brain Sci, 33(2-3), pp. 212–213. doi:10.1017/S0140525X10000361.
  24. Hampton, J.A., Storms, G., Simmons, C.L. and Heussen, D. (2009). Feature integration in natural language concepts. MEM COGNITION, 37(8), pp. 1150–1163. doi:10.3758/MC.37.8.1150.
  25. Hampton, J.A. (2008). Context, categories and modality: Challenges for the Rumelhart model. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 31(6), pp. 716–+. doi:10.1017/S0140525X0800592X.
  26. Molesworth, C.J., Bowler, D.M. and Hampton, J.A. (2008). When prototypes are not best: judgments made by children with autism. J Autism Dev Disord, 38(9), pp. 1721–1730. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0557-7.
  27. Jonsson, M.L. and Hampton, J.A. (2008). On prototypes as defaults (Comment on Connolly, Fodor, Gleitman and Gleitman, 2007). COGNITION, 106(2), pp. 913–923. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2007.02.009.
  28. Hampton, J.A., Estes, Z. and Simmons, S. (2007). Metamorphosis: Essence, appearance, and behavior in the categorization of natural kinds. MEM COGNITION, 35(7), pp. 1785–1800.
  29. Hampton, J.A. (2007). Typicality, graded membership, and vagueness. COGNITIVE SCI, 31(3), pp. 355–384.
  30. Hampton, J.A., Dubois, D. and Yeh, W. (2006). Effects of classification context on categorization in natural categories. MEM COGNITION, 34(7), pp. 1431–1443.
  31. Jonsson, M.L. and Hampton, J.A. (2006). The inverse conjunction fallacy. J MEM LANG, 55(3), pp. 317–334. doi:10.1016/j.jml.2006.06.005.
  32. Hampton, J.A. (2006). Concepts as prototypes. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MOTIVATION: ADVANCES IN RESEARCH AND THEORY, VOL 46, 46, pp. 79–113. doi:10.1016/S0079-7421(06)46003-5.
  33. Hampton, J.A., Estes, Z. and Simmons, C.L. (2005). Comparison and contrast in perceptual categorization. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 31(6), pp. 1459–1476. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.31.6.1459.
  34. Hampton, J.A. (2005). Modeling category coordination: Comments and complications. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 28(4), pp. 496–+.
  35. Molesworth, C.J., Bowler, D.M. and Hampton, J.A. (2005). The prototype effect in recognition memory: intact in autism? JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, 46(6), pp. 661–672. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00383.x.
  36. Hampton, J.A. (2005). Rules and similarity - a false dichotomy. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 28(1), pp. 26–+.
  37. Hampton, J.A. and Cannon, I. (2004). Category-based induction: An effect of conclusion typicality. MEM COGNITION, 32(2), pp. 235–243.
  38. Ruts, W., Storms, G. and Hampton, J. (2004). Linear separability in superordinate natural language concepts. MEMORY & COGNITION, 32(1), pp. 83–95. doi:10.3758/BF03195822.
  39. Hampton, J.A. and Moss, H.E. (2003). Concepts and meaning: Introduction to the special issue on conceptual representation. LANG COGNITIVE PROC, 18(5-6), pp. 505–512. doi:10.1080/01690960344000161.
  40. Hampton, J.A. (2003). Abstraction and context in concept representation. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, 358(1435), pp. 1251–1259. doi:10.1098/rstb.2003.1314.
  41. Dolley, T., Adams, B.D. and Hampton, J.A. (2003). Ideal and actual referral choices for mental health problems in primary care. Counselling Psychology Review, 18, pp. 20–33.
  42. Hampton, J.A. (2002). Language's role in enabling abstract, logical thought. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 25(6), pp. 688–+.
  43. Hampton, J.A. (2000). Concepts and Prototypes. MIND LANG, 15(2-3), pp. 299–307. doi:10.1111/1468-0017.00134.
  44. Storms, G., De Boeck, P., Hampton, J.A. and Van Mechelen, I. (1999). Predicting conjunction typicalities by component typicalities. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW, 6(4), pp. 677–684. doi:10.3758/BF03212978.
  45. Hampton, J.A. (1999). Implicit and explicit knowledge: One representational medium or many? BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 22(5), pp. 769–+.
  46. Hampton, J.A. (1999). Conceptions of concepts. Perspectives in Cognitive Science, 4, pp. 27–38.
  47. Hampton, J.A. (1998). Folk biology and external definitions. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 21(4), pp. 574–+.
  48. Hampton, J.A. (1998). Staying in touch: Externalism needs descriptions. BEHAV BRAIN SCI, 21(1), pp. 74–+.
  49. Hampton, J.A. (1998). Similarity-based categorization and fuzziness of natural categories. COGNITION, 65(2-3), pp. 137–165.
  50. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Conceptual combination: Conjunction and negation of natural concepts. MEM COGNITION, 25(6), pp. 888–909.
  51. Hampton, J.A. (1997). Associative and similarity-based processes in categorization decisions. MEM COGNITION, 25(5), pp. 625–640.
  52. Hampton, J.A. (1996). Conjuctions of visually based categories: overextension and compensation. J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn, 22(2), pp. 378–396.
  53. Braisby, N, , Franks, B., and Hampton, J.A. (1996). Essentialism, word use, and concepts. Cognition, 59, pp. 247–274.
  54. HAMPTON, J.A. (1995). SIMILARITY-BASED CATEGORIZATION - THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE THEORY. PSYCHOLOGICA BELGICA, 35(2-3), pp. 103–125.
  55. Hampton, J.A. (1995). Testing the prototype theory of concepts. Journal of Memory and Language, 34(5), pp. 686–708. doi:10.1006/jmla.1995.1031.
  56. Braisby, N., Franks, B. and Hampton, J.A. (1994). On the psychological basis of rigid designation. Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society .
  57. HAMPTON, J.A. (1992). CATEGORIZATION OF CONJUNCTIVELY DEFINED FUZZY-SETS OF VISUAL-STIMULI. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 30(6), pp. 448–448.
  58. HAMPTON, J.A. (1992). FORMING CONJUNCTIVE COMBINATIONS OF FUZZY CONCEPTS. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 27(3-4), pp. 98–98.
  59. Davey, GCL, , Hampton, J.A., Farrell, J, and Davidson, S, (1992). Some characteristics of worrying: Evidence for worrying and anxiety as separate constructs. Personality and Individual Differences, 13, pp. 133–147.
  60. HAMPTON, J.A. and SPRINGER, K. (1989). LONG SPEECHES ARE BORING - VERIFYING PROPERTIES OF CONJUNCTIVE CONCEPTS. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 27(6), pp. 508–508.
  61. HAMPTON, J.A.M.E.S.A. (1989). 5. Concepts and Correct Thinking. Mind & Language, 4(1-2), pp. 35–42. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0017.1989.tb00238.x.
  62. Hampton, J.A. (1989). Concepts and correct thinking. Mind and Language, 4, pp. 35–41.
  63. Hampton, J.A. (1989). Commentary on G.Lakoff, Women, fire and dangerous things. Mind and Language, 4(1-2), pp. 130–137. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0017.1989.tb00245.x.
  64. HAMPTON, J.A. (1988). DISJUNCTION OF NATURAL CONCEPTS. MEMORY & COGNITION, 16(6), pp. 579–591. doi:10.3758/BF03197059.
  65. HAMPTON, J.A. (1988). GOODNESS-OF-EXAMPLE EFFECTS ON CATEGORIZATION TIMES. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 26(6), pp. 507–507.
  66. Gardiner, J.M., Gregg, V.H. and Hampton, J.A. (1988). Word Frequency and Generation Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 14(4), pp. 687–693.
  67. HAMPTON, J.A. (1988). OVEREXTENSION OF CONJUNCTIVE CONCEPTS - EVIDENCE FOR A UNITARY MODEL OF CONCEPT TYPICALITY AND CLASS INCLUSION. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 14(1), pp. 12–32.
  68. GARDINER, J.M. and HAMPTON, J.A. (1988). ITEM-SPECIFIC PROCESSING AND THE GENERATION EFFECT - SUPPORT FOR A DISTINCTIVENESS ACCOUNT. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 101(4), pp. 495–504. doi:10.2307/1423227.
  69. HAMPTON, J.A. (1987). INHERITANCE OF ATTRIBUTES IN NATURAL CONCEPT CONJUNCTIONS. MEMORY & COGNITION, 15(1), pp. 55–71. doi:10.3758/BF03197712.
  70. Hampton, J.A. (1987). Epistemology and cognition: A review. Mind and Language, 2(3), pp. 264–269. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0017.1987.tb00121.x.
  71. HAMPTON, J.A. (1986). CONJUNCTION, DISJUNCTION, AND NEGATION OF NATURAL CONCEPTS. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 24(5), pp. 332–332.
  72. HAMPTON, J.A. (1986). FEATURE INHERITANCE IN NATURAL CONCEPT CONJUNCTIONS. BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 39, pp. A42–A42.
  73. HAMPTON, J.A. and TAYLOR, P.J. (1985). EFFECTS OF SEMANTIC RELATEDNESS ON SAME DIFFERENT DECISIONS IN A GOOD BAD CATEGORIZATION TASK. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 11(1), pp. 85–93.
  74. HAMPTON, J.A. (1985). COMBINATION OF NATURAL CONCEPTS. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 23(4), pp. 296–296.
  75. GARDINER, J.M. and HAMPTON, J.A. (1985). SEMANTIC MEMORY AND THE GENERATION EFFECT - SOME TESTS OF THE LEXICAL ACTIVATION HYPOTHESIS. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, 11(4), pp. 732–741. doi:10.1037/0278-7393.11.1-4.732.
  76. HAMPTON, J.A. (1984). THE VERIFICATION OF CATEGORY AND PROPERTY STATEMENTS. MEMORY & COGNITION, 12(4), pp. 345–354. doi:10.3758/BF03198294.
  77. HAMPTON, J.A. (1984). ANTONYMY AND SEMANTIC RELATEDNESS IN SAME-DIFFERENT JUDGMENTS. BULLETIN OF THE PSYCHONOMIC SOCIETY, 22(4), pp. 292–292.
  78. GARDINER, J.M. and HAMPTON, J.A. (1984). SEMANTIC MEMORY AND THE GENERATION EFFECT. BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 37(FEB), pp. A12–A12.
  79. HAMPTON, J.A. (1983). A NOTE ON DESCRIBING THE LINEAR RELATION BETWEEN A PAIR OF CORRELATED DEPENDENT-VARIABLES. BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 36(DEC), pp. 408–409.
  80. HAMPTON, J.A. and GARDINER, M.M. (1983). MEASURES OF INTERNAL CATEGORY STRUCTURE - A CORRELATIONAL ANALYSIS OF NORMATIVE DATA. BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, 74(NOV), pp. 491–516.
  81. HAMPTON, J.A. (1982). A DEMONSTRATION OF INTRANSITIVITY IN NATURAL CATEGORIES. COGNITION, 12(2), pp. 151–164. doi:10.1016/0010-0277(82)90010-5.
  82. HAMPTON, J.A. (1981). AN INVESTIGATION OF THE NATURE OF ABSTRACT CONCEPTS. MEMORY & COGNITION, 9(2), pp. 149–156. doi:10.3758/BF03202329.
  83. HAMPTON, J.A. (1979). POLYMORPHOUS CONCEPTS IN SEMANTIC MEMORY. JOURNAL OF VERBAL LEARNING AND VERBAL BEHAVIOR, 18(4), pp. 441–461. doi:10.1016/S0022-5371(79)90246-9.
  84. HAMPTON, J.A. (1979). PRODUCTION AND COMPREHENSION OF UTTERANCES - SCHLESINGER,IM. BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 32(APR), pp. 145–145.
  85. HAMPTON, J.A. (1978). COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGE AND MEANING - MILLER,GA. EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, 21(1), pp. 77–77.
  86. HAMPTON, J.A. (1978). LATERAL THINKING - BONO,ED. BULLETIN OF THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 31(FEB), pp. 53–54.
  87. Dennis, I., , Hampton, J.A. and Lea, SEG, (1973). New problem in concept formation. Nature, 243, pp. 101–102.

Education

Modules Taught on BSc Psychology

- PS1002 Professional Development for Psychology
- PS2001 Research Methods in Psychology
- PS3002 Concepts and categorization
- PS3001 Psychology Project

Contribution to Masters Programmes

MSc Research Methods in Psychology
- PSM518 Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience
MSc in Innovation, Creativity and Leadership
- INM407 Psychology of Creativity and Innovation

Other Activities

Editorial Activities (2)

  1. Action Editor: COGNITIVE SCIENCE, EDITOR, 2015 – present.
  2. Member of Editorial Boards:
    Cognition, Cognitive Science, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, Memory & Cognition, Philosophical Psychology
    .

Find us

City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

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City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.