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portrait of Tim Hanson

Tim Hanson

Senior Research Fellow

School of Arts and Social Sciences

Contact Information

Contact

Visit Tim Hanson

DG12, Rhind Building

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Overview

Tim is a Senior Research Fellow at European Social Survey (ESS) Headquarters, based at City, University of London. He leads the Questionnaire Design and Fieldwork work packages for ESS, having joined the team in November 2019. The ESS is a rigorous comparative biennial survey of changing attitudes and values in over 30 European countries.

Prior to moving to City, Tim was a Research Director at Kantar. Tim spent 15 years at Kantar, where he started his research career as a graduate trainee, after graduating with a BA in Geography and Sociology from the University of Sheffield. During his time at Kantar, he led on design and delivery of numerous social research projects, specialising in attitudinal research, questionnaire development, multi-country projects, and studies for regulatory bodies.

Tim’s research interests include the design/adaptation of surveys based on online/mixed-mode approaches, use of mobile devices for online surveys/mobile-optimised design, item nonresponse, video interviewing, and a range of topics relating to questionnaire design.

He also delivers lectures on questionnaire design and nonresponse as part of City’s Social Research Methods Masters module.

Qualifications

  1. BA Geography and Sociology, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2000 – 2003

Employment

  1. Senior Research Fellow, City, University of London, Nov 2019 – present
  2. Research Director, Kantar, Jul 2004 – Nov 2019

Expertise

Geographic Areas

  • Europe

Publications

Conference papers and proceedings (8)

  1. Hanson, T., McGee, A. and Taylor, L. (2019). Do we know what to do with "Don't Know"? 2019 European Survey Research Association Conference 15 July, Zagreb.
  2. Hanson, T., McGee, A. and Taylor, L. (2019). Do we know what to do with “Don’t Know”? 2019 General Online Research Conference 6-8 March, Cologne.
  3. Hanson, T. (2017). How Should We Adapt Questionnaires for Smartphones: Evidence from UK Surveys and an Experiment on Grids. 17-21 July.
  4. Bell, E., Mathews, P., Wenz, A. and Hanson, T. (2017). Does mobile web survey completion affect response quality amongst young people? Evidence from the second Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE2). 2017 European Survey Research Association Conference 17-21 July, Lisbon.
  5. McGee, A. and Hanson, T. (2017). Usability testing as a method for evaluating self-completion survey instruments; what have we learned in practice and where do we go next? 2017 European Survey Research Association Conference 17-21 July, Lisbon.
  6. Hanson, T. (2017). Adapting Questionnaire for Smartphones: An Experiment on Grid Format Questions. 2017 General Online Research Conference 15-17 March, Berlin.
  7. Hanson, T. (2016). How Should We Adapt Complex Social Research Questionnaires for Mobile Devices? Evidence from UK Surveys and Experiments. 9-13 November.
  8. Hanson, T., Matthews, P. and Wenz, A. (2015). Towards device agnostic survey design: challenges and opportunities for Understanding Society. 2015 Understanding Society Scientific Conference 21-23 July, University of Essex.

Journal articles (3)

  1. Maslovskaya, O., Durrant, G.B., Smith, P.W.F., Hanson, T. and Villar, A. (2019). What are the Characteristics of Respondents using Different Devices in Mixed‐device Online Surveys? Evidence from Six UK Surveys. International Statistical Review, 87(2), pp. 326–346. doi:10.1111/insr.12311.
  2. Hanson, T. and Matthews, P. (2017). Adapting survey design for smartphones: lessons from usability testing and survey implementation. Social Research Practice, (3 (Winter 2016-17)), pp. 37–44.
  3. Hanson, T. (2015). Comparing agreement and item-specific response scales: results from an experiment. Social Research Practice, (1 (Winter 2015)), pp. 17–25.