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Journalism students raise more than £1,300 for East Africa famine appeal

Money raised by MA International Journalism students who sold copies of their end of year magazines

by City Press Office (General enquiries)

Thirty-nine students from the MA International Journalism course have donated £1,308.64p to the Disasters Emergency Committee's (DEC) East Africa Crisis Appeal.

The money was raised by the students selling copies of their end of year magazines following a seven-week production period when they produced from scratch two full-colour publications as part of their coursework.

The magazines were "Unreported London", a collection of quirky news and feature stories from around the capital, and "Eat&Sip", a food and drink magazine featuring an exclusive interview with MasterChef 2017 winner Saliha Mahmood-Ahmed.

Both magazines contained a four-page explanation and infographic explaining how 16 million people are on the brink of starvation in East Africa. A breakdown of how the DEC spends the money raised and where to donate were also included.

The students decided to do the fundraiser after watching the ITV News report Famine - Millions on the Brink: Tonight by Somalian-born journalist Rageh Omaar in a News Journalism class in April.

These guys worked extremely hard for seven weeks and then got out on the street to squeeze as much money as they could from the public – Senior Lecturer Brendan Martin

Having produced their magazines and stayed up 24 hours to cover the General Election on their own website, the students then took to the streets to sell their work. Copies of each magazine were £2 each. But students reported some members of the public giving them more than that. Many staff members in the Department of Journalism chose to pay for copies rather than take complimentary ones.

The MAIJ students produce magazines at the end of each year and are entitled to copies free of charge to shows potential employers, family and friends.

"But this year, I was touched when many of them said they wanted to pay for their own copies," said their tutor Senior lecturer Brendan Martin. "Indeed, the whole episode was a very moving experience. These guys worked extremely hard for seven weeks and then got out on the street to squeeze as much money as they could from the public for the famine relief efforts of those charities that are part of DEC.

"This year's group of MAIJ print students were one of the best with whom fellow tutor Paul Majendie and I have had the pleasure of working. They were great workers and great fun. I am sure they will do well in their future careers."

A spokesman for DEC thanked the students for their work and congratulated them on the amount raised saying it would make a difference.

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