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New study aims to understand how individual differences affect aphasia recovery

Project aims inform insights to the design and delivery of therapeutic intervention and future research

by George Wigmore (Senior Communications Officer)

VC AwardsAn academic from the School of Health Sciences is part of a new international study looking at the rehabilitation and recovery of people with aphasia after stroke.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health Research (NIHR) for two years, the RELEASE (REhabilitation and recovery of peopLE with Aphasia after StrokE) project aims to explore the contribution that individual characteristics and intervention components make to the natural history of recovery and rehabilitation of people with aphasia following stroke. The project will also work in collaboration with the activities of the Collaboration of Aphasia Trialists (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action IS1208).

Led by the NMAHP Research Unit at Glasgow Caledonian University and involving Dr Katerina Hilari from the School of Health Sciences at City University London, the RELEASE project will commence in November 2015, and will involve an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers from Australia, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden, UK and USA.RELEASE will include retrospective analyses of pooled, anonymised aphasia datasets to examine the predictors of recovery from post-stroke aphasia.

Speaking about the project, Dr Katerina Hilari a Reader in Acquired Language Impairments from the School of Health Sciences, said:

“We hope that through this new project we can inform insights to the design and delivery of therapeutic intervention and future research by using pre-existing aphasia datasets. As part of the RELEASE project we will explore not only the natural history of language recovery, but also the aphasia and stroke characteristics which are linked to language outcomes. In addition the components of effective aphasia rehabilitation interventions will form an important part of the study.

”The study hopes to deliver on the components of aphasia therapy that best facilitate recovery after stroke; the natural history of recovery from aphasia, with and without therapy; and the individual factors that contribute to recovery from aphasia."

For more information see bit.ly/1Ol9PBW

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