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School of Mathematics, Computer Science & Engineering

Past Events

We hold a regular programme of meetings and seminars at 1pm on Fridays with a mixture of external and local speakers. If you are interested in attending one of our seminars or visiting us to give a seminar, please contact Daniel Holliday.

Please see below for details of events held in previous years:

Winter 2013

21st February, 1pm - 2pm: Rene Bastijans (Pearson)

31st January, 1pm - 2pm: Simone Stumpf

6th December 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Rebecca Fiebrink (Princeton University & Goldsmiths University)

Title: Interactive Machine Learning for End-User Systems Building in Music and Beyond

29th November 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Simon Attfield (Middlesex University)

Title: Exploring User-Generated Representations in Investigatory Sensemaking Tasks

22nd November 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Mounia Lalmas (Yahoo! Labs)

Title: To be or not be engaged: What is the question (to ask)?


Autumn 2013

25th October 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Ciaran Fisher (University of Sussex)

Title: The Digital Stadium - Bringing Fans Together Through Connectivity

11th October 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A108: Diane Murray (HCI Consultant at Putting People Before Computers and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Interacting with Computers) & Elizabeth Buie (Northumbria University)

Title: Usability in Government Systems

27th September 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Anthony Thomas (ThingMaker)

Title: The 3D Experience: Entry Points


Summer 2013

23rd August 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Mark Freeman (University of Wollongong)

Title: Evaluating Contemporary User Interfaces

13th August 2013, 12:30pm - 1:30pm in A109: Graham Dove (HCID)

Title: Using Information Visualization to Support Creativity in Design

26th July 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Minou Parhizkar (HCID)

Title: A Conceptual Framework for Cloud ERP Using Business Process On-Demand

11th July 2013, 12pm-1pm in A214: Dara Sherwani, Mphil to PhD transfer

Title: User Trust in Online Reviews

5th July 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Uta Hinrichs (Research Fellow at the School of Computer Science at the University of St. Andrews) and Alice Thudt (PhD student at the Innovis Group, Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary)

Title: Using Visualization to Support Serendipity in Digital Collections


Spring 2013

25th May 2013, 1pm - 2pm in B307B: Tracey Booth

Title: End-User Experiences of Visual and Textual Programming Environments for Arduino

12th April 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Richard Banks, Principal Interaction Designer in the Socio-Digital Systems group of Microsoft Research

Title: The Future of Looking Back

5th April 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A109: Balder Onarheim, Assistant Professor at the Design and Engineering Innovation Group, Technical University of Denmark

Title: Creativity Constraints: From Neurological to Physical Constraints

22nd Mach 2013, 12pm-1pm in AG03: Mobina Nouri, Mphil to PhD transfer

Title: Affective Flow-Based Space for Creativity: Manipulating Designers' Emotion to Enhance Creativity

12th March 2013, 1pm - 2pm in D111: Jim Ang, Lecturer in Multimedia and Digital Systems at University of the Kent

Title: Do You Like Me or My Avatar?

1st March 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A214: Konstantinos Zachos and Shiona Webster

Title: An Emerging Computational Model of Flow Spaces in Social Creativity and Learning


Winter 2013

15th February 2013, 1pm - 2pm in A214: David Wilson of the University of North Carolina

Title: Dancing with Technology: Creativity Support Tools in the Performing Arts

18th January 2013, 12pm - 1pm in A109: Limor Schweitzer of Robosavvy

Title: Demonstration of Humanoid Robots

8th January 2013, 12pm - 1pm in A109: Julie Doyle of CASALA

Title: An Integrated Home-Based Self-Management System to Support the Wellbeing of Older Adults


2012

14th December 2012, 12pm - 1pm in A109: Dympna O'Sullivan

Title: Applications for clinical decision support in the Emergency Department

13th December, 10am - 11am in A107: Anja Sisarica

Title: Creativity support in gaming solutions for motivated reflective learning


Autumn 2012

23rd November 2012: Lorenzo Strigini and Eugenio Alberdi

Title: Beyond Complacency: Automation Bias in Computer Assisted Decision Making

9th November 2012: Graham McAllister (Player Research)

Title: Improving Video Games with User Research

2nd November 2012: Bertrand Nouvel (Mindstorm)

Title: Mindstorm Multitouch: Social Multiplayer Interactions

26th October 2012: Minou Parhizkar

Title: Cloud ERP: New Innovation in Information Technology

19th October 2012: Jacques Chueke

Title: Investigating Perceptible Affordance on New and Unlearned Interactions: An Eye Tracking Study of Natural User-Interfaces

12th October 2012: Neil Maiden

Title: A Software App to Support Creative Thinking in Dementia Care

5th October 2012: Mobina Nouri

Title: Kansei engineering in user-centred design

21st September 2012: Sam Hinton (University of Canberra)

Title: Generous and playful online interfaces to cultural collections


Spring 2012

18th May 2012 (A110): Tim Kindberg, founder and managing director of matter2media

Title: Pervasive media: Creative applications of pervasive computing and the role of practice-based research

13th April 2012: Anja Sisarica

Title: Empowering understanding in person-centred dementia care by creative problem solving and serious games


Winter 2012

24th February 2012: Dr Konstantinos Zachos

Title: A Creativity App to Help People with Dementia

13th January 2012: Dr Bill Karakostas

Title: Concepts, Technologies and Systems for Smart Evacuation


2011

  • 9th December 2011: Rebecca Stewart

Title: Spatial Audio in User Interfaces for Music Collection Navigation

  • 14th October 2011: Faidon Loumakis from Fluent Interaction

Title: How do images smell? Effects of image information scent in search engine results pages

Title: I'm just a guy with the hammer

  • 30th September 2011: Dana McKay from Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne

Title: Digital, physical, interactive, human: Tales from an academic library

  • 23rd September 2011: Amélie Cordier, SILEX Team, LIRIS Lab

Title: Reasoning from Users' Experiences: from Case-Based Reasoning to Traces-Based Reasoning.


6th December 2013

Title: Interactive Machine Learning for End-User Systems Building in Music and Beyond

Abstract:

I build, study, teach about, and perform with new human-computer interfaces for real-time digital music performance. Much of my research concerns the use of supervised learning as a tool for musicians, artists, and composers to build digital musical instruments and other real-time interactive systems. Through the use of training data, these algorithms offer composers and instrument builders a means to specify the relationship between low-level, human-generated control signals (such as the outputs of gesturally-manipulated sensor interfaces, or audio captured by a microphone) and the desired computer response (such as a change in the parameters driving computer-generated audio). The task of creating an interactive system can therefore be formulated not as a task of writing and debugging code, but rather one of designing and revising a set of training examples that implicitly encode a target function, and of choosing and tuning an algorithm to learn that function.

In this talk, I will provide a brief introduction to interactive computer music and the use of supervised learning in this field. I will show a live musical demo of the software that I have created to enable non-computer-scientists to interactively apply standard supervised learning algorithms to music and other real-time problem domains. This software, called the Wekinator, supports human interaction throughout the entire supervised learning process, including the generation of training data by real-time demonstration and the evaluation of trained models through hands-on application to real-time inputs.

Drawing on my work with users applying the Wekinator to real-world problems, I'll discuss how data-driven methods can enable more effective approaches to building interactive systems, through supporting rapid prototyping and an embodied approach to design, and through "training" users to become better machine learning practitioners. I'll also discuss some of the remaining challenges at the intersection of machine learning and human-computer interaction that must be addressed for end users to apply machine learning more efficiently and effectively, especially in interactive contexts.

Bio:

Rebecca Fiebrink is a Lecturer in Graphics and Interaction at Goldsmiths College, University of London. As both a computer scientist and a musician, she is interested in creating and studying new technologies for music composition and performance. Much of her current work focuses on applications of machine learning to music: for example, how can machine learning algorithms help people to create new digital musical instruments by supporting rapid prototyping and a more embodied approach to design? How can these algorithms support composers in creating real-time, interactive performances in which computers listen to or observe human performers, then respond in musically appropriate ways? She is interested both in how techniques from computer science can support new forms of music-making, and in how applications in music and other creative domains demand new computational techniques and bring new perspectives to how technology might be used and by whom.

Fiebrink is the developer of the Wekinator system for real-time interactive machine learning, and she frequently collaborates with composers and artists on digital media projects. She has worked extensively as a co-director, performer, and composer with the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which performed at Carnegie Hall and has been featured in the New York Times, the Philadelphia Enquirer, and NPR's All Things Considered. She has worked with companies including Microsoft Research, Sun Microsystems Research Labs, Imagine Research, and Smule, where she helped to build the #1 iTunes app "I am T-Pain." Recently, Rebecca has enjoyed performing as the principal flutist in the Timmins Symphony Orchestra, as the keyboardist in the University of Washington computer science rock band "The Parody Bits," and as a laptopist in the Princeton-based digital music ensemble, Sideband. She holds a PhD in Computer Science from Princeton University and a Master's in Music Technology from McGill University.

29th November 2013

Title: Exploring User-Generated Representations in Investigatory Sensemaking Tasks

Abstract:

During the process of conducting investigations, such as those carried out by lawyers, the police or intelligence services, users typically structure information in more or less complex ways as part of a reciprocal interaction between information seeking and evolving theories and questions. Structuring can help the user make sense of what they know, what they can infer and what they need to know. From the perspective of tool design, there are questions to be asked about what type of representational support and interaction might allow users to be most effective during different kinds of investigation tasks. In this talk I will present three studies conducted at Middlesex University which explore this space through mock intelligence analysis tasks. Two of the studies were conducted using a system developed at Middlesex called INVISQUE (INteractive Visual Search and QUery Environment) and a third was conducted using MS OneNote. The study outcomes include some findings relating to cognitive workload, a series of implications for design, and an early pass at a functional theory of embedded representational structuring (ERST) for characterising user-generated representations and specifying tool design.

This work was conducted in collaboration with Prof. William Wong, Dr. Neesha Kodagoda, Dr. Chris Rooney and Efeosasere Okoro.

Bio:

Dr. Simon Attfield is a Senior Lecturer at the Interaction Design Centre at Middlesex University. His research lies in the area of understanding how people work with information, processes involved in individual and collaborative investigatory sensemaking, and implications for interactive systems design. He has conducted field-based user-studies in news, legal and healthcare settings. He is co-author of the book Interacting with Information, part of the Morgan Claypool series of Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics.

22nd November 2013

Title: To be or not be engaged: What is the question (to ask)?

Abstract:

In the online world, user engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the phenomena associated with wanting to use a web application longer and frequently. User engagement is a multifaceted, complex phenomenon, giving rise to a number of approaches for its measurement: self-reporting (e.g., questionnaires); observational methods (e.g., facial expression analysis, desktop actions); and web analytics using online behavior metrics. These methods represent various trade-offs between the scale of the data analyzed and the depth of understanding. For instance, surveys are hardly scalable but offer rich, qualitative insights, whereas click data can be collected on a large-scale but are more difficult to analyze. Still, the core research questions each type of measurement is able to answer are unclear. This talk will present various efforts aiming at combining approaches to measure engagement and seeking to provide insights into what questions to ask when measuring engagement.

Bio:

Mounia Lalmas is a Principal Research Scientist at Yahoo Labs, which she joined in January 2011. Prior to this, she held a Microsoft Research/RAEng Research Chair at the School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow. Before that, she was Professor of Information Retrieval at the Department of Computer Science at Queen Mary, University of London, which she joined in 1999 as a lecturer (aka assistant professor). From 2002 until 2007, she co-led the Evaluation Initiative for XML Retrieval (INEX), a large-scale project with over 80 participating organizations worldwide, which was responsible for defining the nature of XML retrieval, and how it should be evaluated. Her current research focuses on three main areas: user engagement, social media and search.

25th October 2013

Title: The Digital Stadium - Bringing Fans Together Through Connectivity

Abstract:

The talk will focus on the challenges we faced in order to produce a real-world implementation of a Delay Tolerant Network on modern smart phones. The goal of the DTN was to bring increased connectivity to a stadium, where traditionally it has been an issue, which would in turn enhance the match day experience for fans.

Bio:

Ciaran is a second year PhD student at the University of Sussex and has been working on this project for the last 8 months. His interest lies in ad-hoc networking and the application of the field to the real world. His previous work before academia was designing and building tracking devices for vehicles.

11th October 2013

Title: Usability in Government Systems

Abstract:

Elizabeth Buie and Dianne Murray are co-editors of a recent book, Usability in Government Systems: User Experience Design for Citizens and Public Servants, This book, the first one to address the subject, contains chapters written by more than 30 experts in the field and covers the whole range of government systems, from procurement through citizen engagement, together with a useful brief history of the area.

Dianne and Elizabeth will give a half-hour presentation about working with government systems and websites, and will offer some insights on the role of usability and user experience in government systems. They will discuss how applying these principles and techniques in the design of government systems can make government more effective and efficient, thereby making it more cost effective and less expensive to run. They will describe how these approaches can enable government systems to give their users a satisfying and even - dare we hope? - pleasant experience, whether they are interacting with their government from the outside or working for it on the inside. The remaining half hour will be devoted to Q&A.

Bio:

Dianne Murray has a joint degree in Computer Science and Psychology and has been active in the field since 1979. She is an independent HCI consultant, researcher and educator and Editor-in-Chief of the journal Interacting with Computers. She has been a senior scientist in a national research laboratory and has taught in a number of UK universities, including at City in the 1980s. She held a Senior Research Fellowship in a multi-disciplinary group at the University of Surrey and carried out some of the earliest work in adaptive interfaces and then, later, in design ethnography. Highly active in the community (one of the founders of the British HCI Group (aka 'interaction'), SIGCHI's first International Chair, and co-initiator, in 1993, of the IUI conference series), she was Interacting with Computers' Deputy Editor at its inception and has successfully managed and edited the journal for the past 15 years. Dianne is also is an editor for the Springer HCI book series and is currently President of the European Association for Cognitive Ergonomics (EACE).

Elizabeth Buie is finishing the first year of a PhD programme in Design Research at Northumbria University, in Newcastle upon Tyne. She (re)entered academia with two master's degrees - Mathematics and Human Development - and more than 35 years of industry experience in the US and Europe, during which she focused on improving the usability and user experience of government systems (with a few non-profit and commercial systems thrown in for good measure). Her government projects have ranged from public websites to internal social media web apps to touchscreen kiosks to spacecraft control centres; and their user populations have ranged from the general public to the astronauts on board the International Space Station. UXGov, as she calls the book, is the first - and so far, the only - book that covers the intersection of user experience and government systems. Just ask, and Elizabeth will bend your ear with stories about her experiences as a foreigner and new temporary resident using UK Government websites

27th September 2013

Title: The 3D Experience: Entry Points

Abstract:

Popular media opinion of 3D printing and associated technologies is hyperbolic and overblown. It will not fundamentally change our relationships with everyday plastic products anytime in the near future, however it does have some fantastic, subversive and unseen strengths.

ThingMaker founder Anthony Thomas will take you on a guided tour of what's really happening in 3D printing.
Learn how industry is tentatively making steps to new and improved products.
The amateur has a new spectrum.
Where does China come into all of this?
Plus some findings from his work engaging the general public in 3D technology.

Bio:

Anthony is the founder of 3D company ThingMaker, working to bring the power of 3D technology in useful and accessible ways to more people. Since studying engineering he has worked on startups, built bridges and constructed numerous 3D printers.

23rd August 2013

Title: Evaluating Contemporary User Interfaces

Abstract:

There has been a dramatic shift in the possible interaction methods with computing devices over the past decade, including both traditional PCs and handheld devices (e.g. smartphones and tablets). This seminar will highlight some of the changes in interaction methods; including the introduction of touch and gesture based Natural-User Interfaces. The potential issues associated with conducting research into user interaction with these new interfaces will also be discussed.

Results from two studies will be presented. The first study explored a users ability to learn how to interact with a system and the mental effort required to learn the content in the system. This study focused on developing a deeper understanding of the cognitive load a user faces when interacting with web-based applications. The second study explored the use of different mobile devices for a number of regular tasks (e.g. phone call, calendar entry, web access). This study explored the users cognitive load and the errors that were made when interacting with these devices. Both of these studies can be used to further our understanding of user behaviour with contemporary user interfaces. Finally a discussion of future trends in the area will be presented.

Bio:

Mark Freeman is a lecturer in the School of Information Systems and Technology in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He is also responsible for coordinating the Bachelor of Business Information Systems and is the Director of Industry and Community Engagement for his school. His primary research areas are human-computer interaction and learning technologies where he has published his work in journals and at a number of international information systems conferences. Other research areas include community informatics and social networking technologies. He received a PhD from the University of Wollongong, where his doctoral research examined the relationship between human-computer interaction and e-commerce systems. The thesis was titled 'Assessing the Usability of Online Grocery Systems to Improve Customer Satisfaction and Uptake'. Mark has also previously received a BInfoTech (Hons) and a MEd (Higher Education) from the University of Wollongong.

13th August 2013

Title: Using Information Visualization to Support Creativity in Design

Abstract:

It is increasingly common for organisations to hold large amounts of data, either because that is their primary purpose or simply as a bi-product of their main activities. In addition, the near ubiquity of computing systems means it is now possible to devise low cost data gathering solutions that utilise mobile phones or cheap sensor technology. This offers us easy access to sources of high quality quantitative data that can be used to inform the design of interactive systems. The research outlined in this presentation investigates how we can turn such data into useful insights, creative ideas and innovative design solutions. It is an attempt to explain how information visualization can be used in conjunction with deliberate creativity techniques to support participants in design workshops.

Bio:

Graham Dove is a PhD candidate in the Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice. He has a BA in Artificial Intelligence from Sussex University and an MSC in Human-Centred Systems from City University London. He worked for a number of years designing and developing web applications, and has a long term involvement in internet broadcasting for the live music industry.

26th July 2013

Title: A Conceptual Framework for Cloud ERP Using Business Process On-Demand

Abstract:

In last three decades ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) applications became a solution for most of enterprises to manage their data and business process within the organization. The development of custom applications such as ERP system is generally expensive. One of the significant failures that effect on ERP system is the functional misfit between ERP system packages with business organization procedure. Many research and technology improvement has been done to facilitate ERP system application to become more amenable for business organization. Cloud computing as a new business model has a thoughtful impact on the whole ERP and IT industry. This innovation helps most of organizations to focus more on the core business rather than worry about the IT problems. However the Cloud providers still struggling for the solution to maximize the organization needs and adopt the ERP system to match with all the individual business organization. There is limited resources and research on cloud computing and ERP system conducted to investigate the utilization of ERP business process in the Cloud. For this reason this research consider on the solution to illustrate what capability should Cloud ERP brings compare to the tradition ERP to be more amendable to change and flexible for the organization from the business process point of view. According to the business Process reference model and SAP blueprint we propose a framework for Cloud ERP to have a capability of on-demand business process for the organization to be able to change the core business process of the system without requiring waves of redevelopment, testing and deploying. This approach will help the ERP system to have agile architecture or the architecture that is built to change.

Bio:

Minou started in April 2012 as a PhD Student at the Centre for HCID. She completed her Bachelor in Computer System Engineering at Brunel University in 2008 and then started her MSc in the same University in Business System Integration (with SAP Technology) and achieved her certificate in November 2009. She worked as a Project Coordinator in STEAM Engineering & Industrial Company for two years and gained experience in handling and monitoring all stages of business projects for completion in the oil and gas industry.

11th July 2013

Title: User Trust in Online Reviews

Abstract:

Research in trust has been an increasing concern for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers as users' behaviour towards and usage of systems rely heavily on trust. Among these systems, consumption related online communities, such as TripAdvisor which is the biggest travel community, are becoming an integrated part of users' everyday life. In such communities, users interact with reviews in order to assess services prior to make a purchase decision. Thus, trust in reviews arises as a critical issue which impacts users' purchase decision-making and furthermore, the usability of such online communities.
In spite of the popularity of communities like TripAdvisor, user trust in reviews can be restricted because of a number of barriers such as uncertainty about services, anonymity of users and biased / untruthful reviews. In addition, users are provided with numerous reviews about services and this can negatively influence the purchase decision-making because some barriers may be caused by usability issues such as information overload.

In order to overcome these barriers, this study aimed to answer how to enhance user trust in reviews. Therefore, the influential factors are investigated, clarifying the mechanism of user trust in online reviews. Furthermore, the relationship between user trust and the user interface (UI) design is explored with a view to identify design implications that can help users with assessment of reviews' trustworthiness, avoid information overload and facilitate the decision-making process.

Bio:

Dara Sherwani holds MSc with distinction in electronic business from Huddersfield University, UK. He also holds MBA degree in Net Economy from BMU in cooperation with University of Picardie, France as well as a BSc in Software Engineering from Salahaddin University, Iraq. Dara has been working for 2 years as ICT solutions sales and projects coordinator, especially for Oracle solutions. He joined the Centre for HCID in March, 2012 to pursue his PhD being supervised by Dr. Simone Stumpf and Dr. Bill Karakostas.

5th July 2013

Title: Using Visualization to Support Serendipity in Digital Collections

Abstract:

Physical information spaces such as museum exhibitions or libraries naturally invite for open-ended exploration and serendipitous discoveries. Strolling through a library can be a very rewarding experience especially when we discover intriguing books that we were not looking for initially. While a lot of cultural collections are becoming digitally available, common catalogue interfaces are geared toward targeted search rather than open-ended explorations. They require the input of a search term before they display a list that matches the query. This can be a problematic starting point when we don't exactly know what we are looking for but just want to casually browse through the collection and be inspired.

In this talk we discuss the notion of open-ended exploration and serendipitous discoveries and how these can be supported through information visualization. We present the Bohemian Bookshelf as an example that we designed to parallel the open-ended "browsing the shelves" experience that has been shown to encourage serendipitous discoveries in libraries. The Bohemian Bookshelf consists of five interlinked visualizations, each providing a different perspective on a book collection. The visualizations represent the aesthetic and tangible qualities of books, as well as content data. By providing a variety of perspectives on books, we aim to provide different access points to the collection and to encourage a playful, open-ended yet pleasurable approach to book exploration.

Bio:

Uta Hinrichs is a Research Fellow at the School of Computer Science at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. She received her PhD in Computational Media Design at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary in Canada. Uta's research is at the intersection of information visualization, interaction design, and ethnographically-based studies. Her current research focuses on how to support lightweight and open-ended explorations of information collections, addressing both domain experts as well as everyday people. She is also exploring how to integrate technology in public outdoor and indoor exhibition settings. Hinrichs has an interdisciplinary background in computer science, psychology, political science, and design. She holds a Diplom degree (equiv. MSc.) in Computational Visualistics from the University of Magdeburg in Germany.

Alice Thudt is a PhD student working with Sheelagh Carpendale's at the Innovis Group, Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. Alice's research interests are information visualization, personal informatics and computational media design. Her current research focuses on the development of visualization concepts for the exploration of personal data collections. Alice holds a Diplom degree (equiv. MSc.) in Mediainformatics from the Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Germany.

25th May 2013

Title: End-User Experiences of Visual and Textual Programming Environments for Arduino

Abstract:

This talk will summarise a paper to be published at the International Symposium on End-User Development in Copenhagen, June 2013, based on Tracey Booth's MSc dissertation supervised by Dr. Simone Stumpf. In this talk, we will report the results of an exploratory empirical study that investigated the potential for a visual programming environment to provide benefits with respect to efficacy and user experience to end-user programmers of Arduino as an alternative to traditional text-based coding. We also investigated learning barriers that participants encountered in order to inform future programming environment design. Our study provides a first step in exploring end-user programming environments for physical prototypes.

Bio:

Tracey joined the Centre for HCI Design in October 2012 after completing a MSc in Human Centred Systems with distinction. Her dissertation investigated the potential benefits of visual (graphical) programming languages for end-users programming Arduino. She is currently working as a research fellow on the Stroke Association-fundedEVA project, investigating the potential of multi-user virtual environments for improving the communication skills, and reducing social isolation, of people who have aphasia. She is also working on further refinements to GeST - a software prototype of an innovative gesture training tool for use in aphasia therapy, developed as part of the GReAT project. Before joining City University Tracey headed up the IT development team at YouthNet UK (do-it.org / thesite.org), after gaining experience in a number of industry roles.

12th April 2013

Title: The Future of Looking Back

Abstract:

The things we own connect us with our past. They remind us of the people, places and events that have formed and informed our lives, and if they have been inherited they connect us with the pasts of others. The possessions in our lives, though, are changing in nature, from being physical things with a strong sense of "placeness" to digital things, often distributed and ephemeral. How will we be remember, and be remembered, now that we live increasingly digital lives?

Drawing on observations made in his book, "The Future of Looking Back", Richard Banks will present a number of issues, as well as design explorations and prototypes that explore the space of digital legacy, personal reminiscing and technology longevity. He will:

  • Describe ethnographic work done by Microsoft Research in Cambridge looking at the role of artefacts in our lives, as well as through the process of bereavement.
  • Present a number of conceptual, but working, "Technology Heirlooms" used as design probes to draw out issues from real study participants.
  • Discuss some of the changing notions of legacy that come about because of the digitisation of our things, particularly the impact of the huge quantity of digital things in our lives; our changing sense of possession of our things; and the now default social nature of our possessions.

Bio:

Richard Banks is Principal Interaction Designer in the Socio-Digital Systems group, part of Computer Mediated Living in Microsoft Research's Cambridge facility, based in the UK. He is the author of "The Future of Looking Back", a book which focuses on new digital legacies and the impact they'll have on how we reminisce about our lives. Richard Banks is Honorary Professor of Design at the University of Dundee and a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. A graduate of the Royal College of Art's Computer Related Design course ('95) Richard's primary interests are in the role of digital artefacts in our lives, and the potential contribution of design research to social-science study.

5th April 2013

Title: Creativity Constraints: From Neurological to Physical Constraints

Abstract:

In any creative process there exists limitations on what the creative actor can and can not do, and what the output must or cannot be. Such creativity constraints are both internal, existing within the creative agent, and external, existing in the environment. Based on his work with internal creativity constraints (neurocreativity) and external creativity constraints (design creativity), Balder Onarheim will give an introduction to the concept of creativity constraints and methods utilizing constraints to promote creativity.

Bio:

Balder Onarheim originally graduated from the Norwegian Army Officer School, where he learnt to appreciate the importance of good product design during a winter on the Norwegian-Russian border. This interest resulted in Balder obtaining a masters degree in Industrial Design from the Oslo School of Architecture and Design. During this time his curiosity evolved from army gear to medical equipment. Building on his master thesis 'The Psychology of Design' and experiences with nanotechnology sensors and ambulance aircraft design, he wrote his PhD 'Creativity under Constraints' in collaboration with the Danish medical company Coloplast and Copenhagen Business School. This focused on developing strategies for sustaining creativity in over-constrained domains. Balder is currently employed as an assistant professor at the Technical University of Denmark, where he is involved in research on Design Creativity and NeuroCreativity. In his limited spare time Balder is either in the woods, on water, or involved in hopelessly idealistic start-ups.

During his career Balder has taught at The University of Oslo (entrepreneurship), Oslo School of Architecture and Design (industrial design), Norwegian Red Cross (leadership), University of Otago (product design), University of Århus (interaction design) and Sauder Business School (applied creativity). Currently he teaches at the Technical University of Denmark (co-creation and product analysis/redesign) and Copenhagen Business School (applied creativity). Balder has also given invited talkes at Århus Business School, Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design, University of Copenhagen, Dept. of Engineering Design Cambridge University,University of Aveiro and the Danish Institute of Technology, amongst others.

22nd March 2013

Title: Affective Flow-Based Space for Creativity: Manipulating Designers' Emotion to Enhance Creativity

Abstract:

Creativity as a key component of designing is influenced by different emotions that designers are involved individually or in a group. Designers feel different emotions during a process of design. These emotions have strong potential to enhance or diminish the level of creativity and productivity. Modifying the environment in which design is being done can alter the emotions that designers feel during the design process. In particular the focus of this research so far has been on the visual aspects of the environment. Outcomes of this interdisciplinary research are to be conveyed in a model exploring the relationship between creativity, emotion and the environment. This transfer report delivers an overview of the results achieved so far, and plans for the future work.

Bio:

Mobina is a PhD student in the Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice. She joined the Centre after finishing a BA in Stage Design (Theatre) from Tehran University and MA by Research in Industrial Design from Art University of Tehran. She has been teaching Design in some related courses. Her interests include creativity in group CPS, design process and emotion.

12th March 2013

Title: Do You Like Me or My Avatar?

Abstract:

Since it was first used in the domain of computing in 1985, the term "avatar" has gained popularity in virtual worlds and computer games. Today, there are a variety of avatar-mediated communication tools, where users communicate with each other by representing themselves graphically on screen with their alter ego. These range from sophisticated 3D characters to 2D icons. In this talk, we will look at on how older and younger people use avatar technology. Two studies will be discussed. Study 1 highlights the differences between older and younger people's behaviour and preferences in conventional 3D virtual world. Study 2 focuses specifically on the use of gesture based avatar technology among younger users. Finally, we will take a glimpse at the future of such technology in various application domains.

Bio:

Dr Jim Ang is Lecturer in Multimedia and Digital Systems in the School of Engineering and Digital Arts, University of Kent. Before joining Kent, he was a research fellow at the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design , City University London, where he completed his PhD in the area of social gaming. His main research interest lies in the general area of human computer interaction with an emphasis on social computing. Specific areas include:

  • virtual worlds and computer games
  • computer-mediated communication
  • social network analysis and mining
  • applications of social computing healthcare and analysis of cyber-behaviour

1st March 2013

Title: An Emerging Computational Model of Flow Spaces in Social Creativity and Learning

Abstract:

We are researching and developing a new model within COLLAGE, an EU-funded Integrated Project, to inform and enable the design of effective social creativity and learning technologies and services. This presentation presents an emerging computational model of flow spaces in social creativity and learning that can be applied to guide human-centered creative cognition in social groups. In particular we are planning for the model to be applied to inform creative goal setting, creativity technique selection and adaptation, and guided social interaction during creative problem solving and learning.

Bio:

Konstantinos Zachos received a Computer Science Diploma degree from RWTH Aachen in 2004, and a PhD degree in Software Engineering (specialisation in Service-Oriented Requirements Engineering and Creativity) from City University London in 2008. He is a researcher at the Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design at City University and has been involved in research through numerous EU-funded projects in the areas of requirements engineering, service discovery mechanism and techniques, and creative problem-solving and learning.

Shiona Webster joined the Centre for Human Computer Interaction in October 2012 after completing a Masters degree in Human-Centred Systems at City University. Her dissertation focused on the evaluation of CroMAR, a mobile augmented reality application developed for the iPad, to support and enrich the processes of debriefing and reflective learning for emergency workers and crowd managers. She is working as a Research Fellow on the EU funded project COLLAGE.

15th February 2013

Title: Dancing with Technology: Creativity Support Tools in the Performing Arts

Abstract:

Over the past 3 years, the Dance.Draw project at UNC Charlotte has been investigating issues in computational support to enhance creativity in the performing arts, specifically in dance performance. Our research covers (1) real-time sensing of dancers' movements coupled with interactive performance visualizations, (2) enhancing and measuring audience engagement, and (3) support tools for the creative, collaborative process of performing arts production. This talk presents an overview of project research, performances, and lessons learned.

Bio:

Dr. David Wilson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Software and Information Systems at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His research centres on the development of intelligent software systems to bridge the gaps between human information needs and the computational resources available to meet them. It involves the coordination of intelligent systems techniques (Case-Based Reasoning, Machine Learning, etc.) with geographic, multimedia, database, internet, and communications systems in order to elicit, enhance, apply, and present relevant task-based knowledge. Dr. Wilson has ongoing research projects in Health Informatics, Meta-Reasoning, Creativity Support, Semantics for Geographic Information, Recommender System Robustness, and Group Based Recommendation.

18th January 2013

Title: Demonstration of Humanoid Robots

Abstract:

RoboSavvy Ltd. specializes in sales, distribution, development and support of robotic and DIY products for the hobby, education and research markets worldwide. Hosting the most popular online community for humanoid robot builders and with a wide range of products including humanoid robots, 3D printers, DIY electronics and sensors, RoboSavvy is a leading source of materials and knowledge in the area, developing robots for the education, entertainment and research markets, selling parts needed for creative making of robots and gadgets. RoboSavvy is creating the most advanced 1m tall research humanoid robot in the world, a 3D printable low cost humanoid robot that looks like Honda Asimo designated for a new education program to motivate young minds into engineering paths and driving new forms of startups, new types of research and hobby using 3D printers, sensors, extreme computation and miniature portable power. RoboSavvy is fostering creation of gadgets and robots that were only conceivable in science fiction a few years ago, new type of apps with atoms not just bits and bytes.

Bio:

Limor heads RoboSavvy, a company that distributes and develops advanced mobile robots and parts and tools for making them. Limor started companies in diverse areas such as Telecom Billing, Internet Security and Social Email Templating. He has been granted 12 patents and has spoken at more than 80 conferences. Born in the UK, lived in Italy, USA, Israel and Portugal, he is a hopeless kite surfer and private pilot claiming that the learning process is his ultimate goal.

8th January 2013

Title: An Integrated Home-Based Self-Management System to Support the Wellbeing of Older Adults

Abstract:

With an ageing population and the constant need towards improving the quality of life for older people in our society, there comes an urgent challenge to support people where they live in an environment that adapts to their needs as they age. While much research on ubiquitous sensor systems and telehealth devices focuses on this need, many of these solutions operate at less than full capacity, and with little scope at present to assess everyday aspects of wellbeing. They focus on detecting sudden critical physiological and behavioural changes and offer few mechanisms to support preventative actions. The challenge of predicting changes and prompting positive preventative intervention measures, aiding the avoidance of severe physical or mental harm, has not adequately been addressed. This talk will discuss experiences of designing, deploying and testing an integrated home-based ambient assisted living system (AAL) for older adults at the Great Northern Haven smart homes in Dundalk, Ireland, consisting of ambient monitoring, behaviour recognition and feedback to support self-management of wellness, in addition to providing feedback on home security and home energy. It will highlight further on-going research at the CASALA research centre in the space of technology design for older adults, including an intergenerational co-design project, applications to support emotional wellbeing and a falls prevention project.

Biography:

Dr. Julie Doyle is a post-doctoral research fellow at CASALA in Dundalk Institute of Technology, Ireland. CASALA focuses on technology and ageing through research and development, industry linkage and commercialisation in the emerging Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) and related Connected Health sectors. Julie received a BSc (Hons) degree in Computer Science, and a PhD in Computer Science, from University College Dublin in 2002 and 2006 respectively. Julie subsequently held research positions at the University of Ottawa, Canada, the TRIL (Technology Research for Independent Living) Centre and the CLARITY Centre for Sensor Web Technologies.

Julie's current research is in the field of Human Computer Interaction with a specific focus on the design of healthcare and independent living technologies for older adults. The applications of this work include ambient assisted living, emotional wellbeing, falls, cognition, telehealth and specifically the design of applications in these areas to promote positive wellbeing through feedback and interventions to support older adults in self-managing their health and wellbeing and facilitating positive behaviour change.

Julie has much experience in working directly with older adults as part of the design process for independent living technologies, understanding their needs and their attitudes towards technology and evaluating the usability of technology and older adults' motivations to use it. She runs a research volunteer programme with a number of older adults who visit CASALA weekly to partake in focus groups, interviews and who help in designing and evaluating technologies. She also teaches a weekly IT class for older adults.

13th December 2012

Title: Creativity support in gaming solutions for motivated reflective learning

Abstract:

Creativity techniques embedded in serious game environments have potential to enhance motivation, reflective conversation and problem solving skills in players with learning objectives in professional environments. Findings of this interdisciplinary doctoral research are to be delivered in a form of a domain-independent model exploring and describing the relationship between creativity and serious games, instantiated in game prototypes for application domain of person-centred dementia care. This transfer seminar will provide an overview of results achieved so far, and the roadmap of the future work.

Biography:

Anja Sisarica has been studying full-time towards a PhD in Software Systems Engineering at City University and its Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice since October 2011, being supervised by Prof Neil Maiden and Prof Julienne Meyer. Her doctoral research is supported by MIRROR Studentship. Anja holds a BSc (2010) and a MSc (2011) in Computer
Science from University of Novi Sad. She was a visiting scholar at Sapienza University (BASILEUS EM-ECW), Bremen University (DAAD) and Johannes Kepler University (CEEPUS-II).

14th December 2012

Title: Applications for clinical decision support in the Emergency Department

Abstract:

The advent digital health information in the form of electronic health records, clinical information systems and online biomedical evidence is leading to many decision sciences researchers to look at methodologies for developing clinical decision support systems. A working definition of clinical decision support systems has been proposed by the Centre for Health Evidence as; "Clinical Decision Support systems link health observations with health knowledge to influence health choices by clinicians for improved health care".

In this seminar I will outline the design and development of two component parts of a distributed clinical decision support system where the current application domain is focused on paediatric asthma. The first component is an intelligent prediction model that, given a representation of a current asthma patient in terms of clinical attributes and values tries to predict the severity of an asthma exacerbation. I will describe the design of the model in terms of clinical specifications, classification methodologies, and present results from a retrospectively and prospectively collected asthma datasets.

The second model I will present provides a methodology for retrieving clinical evidence from an online biomedical repository so that it may be used for point of care decision making. The development of the model consists of two main tasks; the creation of an ontology for resolving interoperability issues between clinical terms used at a local clinical site and index terms used by repositories of evidence-based documents, and the development of an information retrieval engine for leveraging evidence so that it can be used to support patient-specific decision making. A set of results evaluating the indexing component of the model will be presented, the retrieval algorithms are currently undergoing a multi-site clinical evaluation.

Biography:

Dympna O'Sullivan obtained a PhD in Computer Science in 2006 and a BSc in Computer Science in 2002, both from University College Dublin, Ireland. Following that she spent 18 months working as a post-doctoral fellow in Health Informatics at The University of Ottawa, Canada. She joined City University London as a Senior Lecturer in Health Informatics in 2012 after working as a Lecturer in Computer Science at Aston University since 2008.

Dympna's research is in the area of health informatics, clinical decision support systems and evidence-based medicine. In particular she is interested in managing the large volumes of data generated by today's digital healthcare environments and in developing intelligent software systems to bridge the gaps between clinician's information needs and the computational resources available to meet them. It involves the application of intelligent systems techniques including artificial intelligence, machine learning, information retrieval and ontological engineering. In addition, she is interested in knowledge management methodologies to address the problem of organizational knowledge-loss by using intelligence systems to capture and reuse knowledge from clinical tasks.

23rd November 2012

Title: Beyond Complacency: Automation Bias in Computer Assisted Decision Making

Abstract:

In many applications of computerised decision aids, users' decisions do not improve as much as expected, or even not at all. A field of study has grown about "automation bias": human errors that appear to be caused by using such aids. For instance, an operator who has the aid of computer-generated alarms for dangerous situations may fail to react to a dangerous situation if the computer fails to raise an alarm. Common terms used for these effects are "over-reliance" or "complacency". However, the very use of these terms betrays a narrow view of these phenomena and their causes, which may lead to ineffective corrective action. For instance, training or procedural changes are favoured responses, but we claim that they do not address all causes of apparently "over-reliant" behaviour. We present work on a case study (computer support for breast cancer screening) where we found evidence of "automation bias" but no evidence of "complacency", and an analysis of the diverse psychological mechanisms that may be involved in human errors when using computer support.

Biography:

Lorenzo Strigini is a Professor of Systems Engineering and the director of the Centre for Software Reliability (CSR) at City University London.
He studied electronic engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy, and has since worked for some 30 years, in Italy, the U.S. and the U.K, on the reliability and safety of systems that include software - from software programs to computer systems to socio-technical systems - and especially on the quantitative assessment of these properties. Most of his work has addressed concerns of safety-critical applications like nuclear energy, aviation and health.
One of his central interests is the use of redundancy to make systems more reliable, safe, secure: how to use it effectively, and how to assess the gains that it brings. Since the 1990s, he has been involved in interdisciplinary work addressing human contributions to reliability and to failures.
He is currently the principal investigator in the SESAMO European project, addressing security concerns in safety-critical systems, and in the UnCoDe project looking at the decision making problems faced by regulators in the licensing of safety critical systems.

Eugenio Alberdi joined the Centre for Software Reliability at City University in January 2001, employed on the DIRC project, and has since worked in a variety of projects (INDEED, ReSIST, CRUK, AMBER, UnCoDE) on areas such as: human reliability, expert decision making (decision biases), decision support and human factors in socio-technical systems. He originally studied Psychology in the University of Deusto (Bilbao, Spain). He worked for almost two years at the Artificial Intelligence Department of Labein Laboratories in Bilbao, on a project combining Machine Learning inductive techniques with theories from the Psychology of Learning. He completed his PhD thesis at the Computing Science Department at the University of Aberdeen (partly supervised by the Psychology Department). The thesis deals with psychological and computational aspects of taxonomic revision. Then he worked for over two years as a Research Fellow in the Psychology Department in Aberdeen, for COGNATE: an ESRC funded cognitive engineering project related to medical decision making and decision support in neonatal intensive care. Before he joined the CSR, he worked at CHIME (UCL) on CADMIUM II: Computer Decision Making in Image Understanding in Medicine.

9th November 2012

Title: Improving Video Games with User Research

Abstract:

This talk will show how user research helps to improve the player experience of video games. Case studies will be presented which outline the methods Player Research use to observe, analyse, and understand players' behaviour and emotion. A life-cycle will be presented which shows how user research can benefit games at all stages of development, and a framework will be presented for analysing the latest free-to-play (F2P) games.

Biography:

Graham is the founder of Player Research, a user research and playtesting studio which provides insights into players and gameplay.

Player Research work with video game studios at all stages of game development, from concept through to release, helping to provide evidence to support design decisions and deliver the best possible player experience.
Their clients include NaturalMotion Games, EA, Sony, Capcom, Splash Damage and the BBC among others.

Graham also writes the column on user research for Edge Online.

2nd November 2012

Title: Mindstorm Multitouch: Social Multiplayer Interactions

Abstract:

In 2006, Mindstorm Multitouch has presented to the world the iBar: an extendable multitouch surface desgined to be integrated in entertainment venues, such as bars and nightclubs. The company has grown and has now built and installed hundreds of similar installations around the world. Beside the hardware, it is the social and playful aspects of the user experience that have made Mindstorm Multitouch successful. In order to remain competitive in a rapidly changing world, we must constantly adapt our innovations. In this talk, we will explain our evolution, and some R&D projects we are currently pursuing in order to invent in the best next generation interactive tables.

Biography:

Bertrand Nouvel is in charge of the research & development and of the middleware applications at Mindstorm Multitouch Ltd. Bertrand has a PhD in Theoretical Computer Sciences from Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon and been working in Innovation departments of TF1(French Television Broadcast). In 2006, he moved to Japan, and started four years of postdoctoral research. Two years in Chiba (Japan) at the Miyake-Tsumura Laboratory, followed by two years at in the Japanese-French Laboratory for Informatics (CNRS), principally collaborating with ShinIchi Satoh on videomining frameworks. He has finally been the principal contributor of a few open source packages: Pyffmpeg, Python Computer Vision Framework.

26th October 2012

Title: Cloud ERP New Innovation in Information Technology

Abstract:

This research investigates on the impact of Cloud in to the ERP system. Business organizations are looking to shift their business in to the higher level in technology because of the competitive business environment. Recently ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) applications became solution for most of enterprises to manage their Data and Business Process within the organization. The downside of this solution is that most of Businesses Organizations have to spend enormous amount of money on software licenses, infrastructure, maintenance, support and training of their employee to implement the ERP applications in their system. In fact enterprises are not confident enough about selecting suitable ERP application for their organization to help them to succeed in future. Cloud computing has a thoughtful impact on the whole IT industry as a new business model. Considering the improvement of cloud computing lately, it can help enterprises to access high performance of IT services with lower cost, and also conductive to small enterprises to have high efficiency IT services like large enterprises, therefore the business organizations can focus more on their Business rather than spending time on IT's problem. The seminar is about to explain the possible solutions for the ERP developer to convince enterprises to move from ERP into the Cloud ERP as a new innovation in Information Technology.

Biography:

Minou started in April 2012 as a PhD Student at the Centre for HCID. She completed her Bachelor in Computer System Engineering at Brunel University in 2008 and then started her MSc in the same University in Business System Integration (with SAP Technology) and achieved her certificate in November 2009. She worked as a Project Coordinator in STEAM Engineering & Industrial Company for two years and gained experience in handling and monitoring all stages of business projects for completion in the oil and gas industry.

19th October 2012

Title: Investigating Perceptible Affordances on New and Unlearned Interactions: An Eye Tracking Study of Natural User-Interfaces

Abstract:

This research investigates Perceptible Affordances and their role in informing users about visual cues for interaction with emerging NUI (Natural User-Interface) technologies. Perceptible Affordances theory is explained through the theoretical lenses of Gaver (1991), Norman (1999 & 2008), Amant (1999) and Nielsen (2008). A study utilising eye-tracking technology followed by a think-aloud component is described, which focused only on the observational phase of participants' interactions with a digital interface. The iGoogle Personal Web Portal was selected as a case study and drag-and-drop interaction was identified as a non-obvious feature that could be unknown to users. From this study, the initial findings demonstrate how previous knowledge is a key factor on spotting specific interface control features. The interface did not present visual cues that would inform users about the availability of the these interactions. During the last year of this research, different iPad icon libraries will be designed and compared by means of a practical investigation with a between-groups design. This empirical case study aims to unveil which version users would be keener to adapt and adopt and thus which designs and UI behaviours present better-adapted perceptible affordances for touch-based NUI.

Biography:

Jacques Chueke graduated in Graphic Design in 1998, and then specialized in Interface Usability, gaining a Master in Design from PUC-Rio, Brazil, in 2005. He's been working for 10 years developing projects for Internet and Software for large companies in Brazil. Jacques was teaching from 2006 to 2009 about Interface Usability and Digital Image at PUC-Rio (postgraduate degrees) among other Institutes. Has a PgDip in Digital Arts from the University of Plymouth, i-DAT Centre (2010). He joined the Centre for HCI Design at City University in October of 2010 as a MPhil/PhD student, supervised by Dr. George Buchanan and Stephanie Wilson. He is sponsored by CAPES - Ministry of Education, Brasília, Brazil.

12th October 2012

Title: A Software App to Support Creative Thinking in Dementia Care

Abstract

This seminar reports a new mobile software app to support creative thinking by carers for people with dementia. The design of the app was informed by both pre-studies that demonstrated the potential of investigating challenging behaviors in non-care domains to improve person-centered care, and a model of creative problem solving adapted to dementia care. The resulting app implements different versions of the Other Worlds creativity technique to generate then reflect on ideas to reduce challenging behaviors by residents with dementia. The reported evaluation of the app undertaken in one residential home revealed that carers were able to use the app as described in the model, and through this behavior deliver novel and useful care to residents in the home.

Biography:

Neil Maiden is Professor of Systems Engineering at City University London. He is and has been a principal and co-investigator on numerous EPSRC- and EU-funded research projects with a total value of £2.5million. He has published over 150 peer-reviewed papers in academic journals, conferences and workshops proceedings. He was Program Chair for the 12th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering in Kyoto in 2004, and is Editor of the IEEE Software's Requirements column. His details are available at http://www-hcid.soi.city.ac.uk/pNeilmaiden.html.

5th October 2012

Title: Kansei engineering in user-centred design

Abstract:

Understanding the emotional needs of the user and reflecting them in the product and service design is a relatively fresh perspective and subjects on which various research have been carried out. Kansei engineering, a systematic technique in emotional design was employed in this project to interpret the feminine emotions towards jewellery. As a source of inspiration Avestan alphabetic letters with their distinct forms have been used to differentiate the design and to create an exclusive identity for the product. Analyzing the Kansei methodology, as the designer's guide in connecting user emotions to the product semantics, was one of this projects goals.

In this case Kansei terminologies relating to jewellery have been accumulated; some of which have been chosen for their richer meanings. Concepts generated with Avestan alphabetic letters in Kansei domain have been evaluated, lending to a number of superior and diverse designs. The designs were than exhibited in the secondary study and 75 people were inquired upon the relevance of the designs and the Kansei terminology describing them. The relation between user's emotions and the design's physical characteristics were investigated afterwards and the elite designs were chosen due to the points given out by the target group. Finally regarding the previous findings, designs were developed and imparted in two different  jewellery sets.

Biography:

Mobina is a PhD student in the Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice. She joined the Centre after finishing a BA in Stage Design (Theatre) from Tehran University and MA by Research in Industrial Design from Art University of Tehran. She has been teaching Design in some related courses. Her interests include creativity in group CPS, design process and emotion.

21st September 2012

Title: Generous and playful online interfaces to cultural collections

Abstract:

Publicly funded cultural institutions (museums, galleries, libraries) maintain databases that describe their collections. These databases frequently contain media, such as images, which provide a way for people to explore the collection even if they cannot come to the physical institution. In a time where funding for cultural institutions is tied to their ability to engage with the public, the provision of online collections provides a valuable (and measurable) way for institutions to engage with the public.

At the University of Canberra, the digital design and media arts research group has been working with a number of Australian cultural institutions to develop innovative ways of allowing people to access their online collections. Our experience is that most collections are accessible via a web-based search interface, but we question the suitability of search as the most appropriate single interface for exploration of the often rich online materials offered by cultural institutions.

In this seminar, I want to outline some of the concepts that underlie our approach to visualising cultural collections, present some of our existing work in this area, and raise some of the challenges we have encountered to date. I will also provide a brief outline of the current project I am working on here at City University. I am very interested in getting ideas, feedback and suggestions.

Biography:

Sam is a senior lecturer in Graphic Design and Media Arts at the University of Canberra in Australia. While his academic interests range across a number of fields, including social media, computer gaming and digital design, his research is presently focused on data visualisation within the cultural sector.

18th May 2012

Title: Pervasive media: Creative applications of pervasive computing and the role of practice-based research

Abstract:

In this talk I will describe the work of the Pervasive Media Studio, in which technologists, artists, academics and producers collaborate to integrate computing, sensing and actuation into theatre, music, narrative and other art forms. This practice-based research is quite different, methodologically speaking, from research as conducted in industry and academia. It has led to conceptions of pervasive computing that are in some ways at odds with notions in conventional computer science, particularly that of context. It has also led to commercial activities that extend the functionality provided by the creative industries. I will include case studies from my own work and that of others.

Biography:

Tim Kindberg is a computer scientist turned creative technologist based in Bristol, UK. He has held academic positions including visiting professorships at Bath University & ITU Copenhagen. He worked in Hewlett Packard Labs in Palo Alto USA, & Bristol, and was research director at the Pervasive Media Studio. He is principal at matter2media.com, where he develops mobile/pervasive computing platforms and installations for the creative industries. He has a PhD in computer science and a BA in mathematics.

13th April 2012

Title: Empowering understanding in person-centred dementia care by creative problem solving and serious games

Abstract:

Reflecting on the first months of her PhD studies, Anja will introduce her research motivation, share insights from her literature review, present the ongoing collaborations and discuss the emerging doctoral research plan.

Anja is exploring opportunities in synergies between creative problem solving and serious games that apply reflective learning to inform general improvements of challenging working environments. Findings of this research, supported by a City University London scholarship and the EU-funded MIRROR Integrated Project, are to be tested in customized gaming solutions for assisting creative training in person-centred professional care of people with dementia.

Biography

Anja Sisarica is studying full-time towards a PhD in Software Systems Engineering at City University London and its Centre for Creativity in Professional Practice, being supervised by Prof Neil Maiden (School of Informatics), and Prof Julienne Meyer (School of Health Sciences). Her doctoral research is sponsored by MIRROR Studentship and Fund for Young Talents of Serbia. Anja holds a BSc (2010) and a MSc (2011) in Computer Science from University of Novi Sad. She was a visiting scholar at Sapienza University (BASILEUS EM-ECW), Bremen University (DAAD) and Johannes Kepler University (CEEPUS-II), and has been alumna of ExperiencingEurope internship programme (WUS Austria, Foundation Dr Zoran Djindjic) and Eurobank EFG scholarship programme.

24th February 2012

Title: A Creativity App to Help People with Dementia

Abstract:

This talk will present results of research to design and evaluate a mobile creativity support app with which to care for people with dementia. The app was designed for care staff in residential homes to use to create new solutions to challenging behaviors through case-based and analogical reasoning with past cases of good care practice. To enable staff to create new solutions the app uses computational creativity services to generate new content that it presents in the work context to support cognitive creativity.

Biography:

Konstantinos Zachos received a PhD degree in Service-Oriented Requirements Engineering and Creativity from City University London in 2008. He is a researcher at the Centre for Human-Computer Interaction at City University and has been involved in research in the areas of requirements engineering, service discovery mechanism and techniques, and creative problem-solving with a focus on supporting requirements discovery and invention with creativity tools. He is currently designing and developing creativity models, techniques and tools to reinforce learning and reflection in creative problem solving as part of the EU-funded Framework VII Integrated Project called MIRROR.

13th January 2012

Title: Concepts, Technologies and Systems for Smart Evacuation

Abstract:

We present the concept of smart evacuation, i.e. the intelligent use of technologies to facilitate the efficient and safe evacuation of crowds from a disaster scene. We present the concept of 'situation awareness' and how this is supported by effective use of information and communication technologies. We overview technologies for smart evacuation such as active signage, image processing for crowd behaviour detection and mobile cloudlets.

Biography:

Bill joined the Centre in 2000 and is currently a senior lecturer. Prior to that, he was a research fellow and lecturer with the Department of Computation, UMIST in Manchester . Bill holds a degree in Computer Engineering and Informatics, from Patras University , Greece and both MSc and PhD in Software Engineering from University of Manchester . Bill has published over 100 research papers and two books on Systems Requirements Engineering and Model-Driven Service Engineering. He is a member of the ACM and IEEE Computer Society. His current research interests include systemic approaches to service engineering, languages and environments for service specification, generation and orchestration, and e-service mass customization.

9th December 2011

Title: Spatial Audio in User Interfaces for Music Collection Navigation

Abstract:

Visualisations of music collections have employed maps as a way to navigate the virtual space that the collection inhabits. However, these types of interfaces can be problematic for users. This talk will look at past approaches to user interfaces for navigating music collections and how 3D or spatial audio has been used. It will examine how these approaches should be reconsidered and present recent work in the area, focusing on two applications: creating playlists and returning audio search results.

Biography:

Rebecca Stewart completed her PhD with the Centre for Digital Music at Queen Mary, University of London under the supervision of Prof Mark Sandler in 2010. In her PhD and postdoctoral research she looked at how music discovery and music collection navigation could be aided with user interfaces that utilise spatial audio. This past September, Rebecca started a company called Codasign and currently develops audio signal processing software and collaborates with artists that work with interactive media.

14th October 2011

Title: How do images smell? Effects of image information scent in search engine results pages

Abstract:

According to Information Foraging Theory, all elements in web pages have a distinctive smell that helps the user decide which path to follow in order to find the information they're looking for. But what happens when scents contradict each other? What happens when strong scents combine? Do they create an even stronger scent or does it make no difference to the user? To find out, we added images to Google search results pages and observed people using them to find specific pieces of information.

This talk will describe two experiments aimed at understanding what effect on user behaviour the addition of images has on a "traditional" search results page. The information scent of images and text was measured and we made several combinations of scents to measure the performance of the page.

Our results demonstrate that users rely heavily on text to make their decisions and although users perceive images to be a useful addition to the page, they do not significantly improve the usability of a search results page.

Biography:

Faidon Loumakis graduated from City University MSc Human-Centred Systems course in January 2011. He interned with and now works as a user experience consultant for Fluent Interaction, delivering user research, insight, and design for major UK companies across ecommerce, mobile and information-heavy websites.

Faidon's dissertation was on Information Foraging theory. His paper "This Image Smells Good: Effects of Image Information Scent in Search Engine Results Pages" is being presented at the CIKM conference inGlasgow later this year. http://www.cikm2011.org

30th September 2011

Title: Digital, physical, interactive, human: Tales from an academic library

Abstract:

Libraries, and academic libraries in particular are complex sites of human interaction with information. The information these libraries provide includes books, video, audio and articles, and it is provided through a variety of media and systems. In the end, though, if library users can't find and access information, be it physical or digital, the information isn't useful.  In this talk I will discuss three studies of information seeking and use done in an academic library:

one about how researchers manage their publication identities, and search for work by specific people, the second about how library users get lost looking for material on the shelves, and the final one about how users search from  the library homepage. With these three examples I hope to demonstrate some of the information and interaction problems facing libraries, and provide scope for library-based research.

Biography:

Dana McKay is a human computer interaction and digital libraries researcher-practitioner at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests include information discovery, ebooks and ebook readers, search behaviour and information seeking behaviour more generally, information seeking in physical spaces, and digital libraries. Dana has a research and educational background in mobile interaction and web usability, and a research affiliation with the Institute for Social Research at Swinburne. As well as her work as a user experience architect for Swinburne Library, her professional background includes a secondment to Nokia Research Centre in Helsinki, usability consulting, and teaching.

23rd September 2011

Title: Reasoning from Users' Experiences: from Case-Based Reasoning to Traces-Based Reasoning.

Abstract:

Case-Based Reasoning is an artificial intelligence paradigm that consist in reusing previous experiences (cases) to solve new problems. The problem with Case-Based Reasoning is that "cases" are too restrictive to effectively represent "experiences". Traces are relatively new digital objects that enables us to capture "interactions" between users and systems. For numerous reasons, traces are rich objects. Trace-Based Reasoning is an evolution of the Case-Based Reasoning paradigm where cases are replaced by traces. Trace-Based Reasoning can be used for many purposes. One of them is user assistance. This will be the main topic of this talk. Indeed, in this presentation, I will give an introduction to Trace-Based Reasoning and I will show the benefits of Trace-Based Reasoning for user assistance. In the meantime, I will discuss open research questions related to Trace-Based Reasoning. Next, I will give several examples of Trace-Based applications developed in the Silex team (both academic and industrial applications).

Biography:

Amélie Cordier is an associate professor in the University of Lyon. She conducts her research in the LIRIS Laboratory. She received her PhD in 2008. She worked on an interactive and opportunistic approach to acquire knowledge for Case-Based Reasoning systems. Ever since, she works on experience sharing and experience reusing. She is involved in several academic projects (Ideal, Kolflow, Ozalid), and has a couple of partnerships withs industrials (SAP-Bo, IBM). She is interested in Case-Based Reasoning, Trace-Based Reasoning, Users' Experiences, Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering.

Dr. David Wilson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Software and Information Systems at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His research centres on the development of intelligent software systems to bridge the gaps between human information needs and the computational resources available to meet them. It involves the coordination of intelligent systems techniques (Case-Based Reasoning, Machine Learning, etc.) with geographic, multimedia, database, internet, and communications systems in order to elicit, enhance, apply, and present relevant task-based knowledge. Dr. Wilson has ongoing research projects in Health Informatics, Meta-Reasoning, Creativity Support, Semantics for Geographic Information, Recommender System Robustness, and Group Based Recommendation.