Events

  1. Events
  2. 2020
  3. September
  4. Liza Lim: Post-human songs for the Anthropocene

Sep

30

Wednesday

Liza Lim: Post-human songs for the Anthropocene

2.00pm

Lectures

Public

Please note the change of the usual time. This event will be held on Zoom webinar

The talk focuses on Liza Lim’s large chamber work ‘Extinction Events and Dawn Chorus’ (2018) using an ecological register to think about compositional creativity as something constituted by many other beings, objects, stories and systems. This sense of radical entanglement that acts to de-centre the human (hence ‘post-human’) not only plays out in the compositional thinking but is reflected in a related speculative writing project: ‘A Musical Bestiary’. Co-authored with eco-musicologist Dr Joseph Browning (City Uni) the article experiments with the structures of a mediaeval bestiary adopting the idea of music as ‘creatures’ to comment on moral and ethical questions about our times.

Prof. Liza Lim (University of Sydney)

Liza Lim is a composer, educator and researcher whose music focusses on collaborative and transcultural practices. The roots of beauty (in noise), time effects in the Anthropocene and the sensoria of ecological connection are ongoing concerns in her compositional work. Her four operas: The Oresteia (1993), Moon Spirit Feasting (2000), The Navigator (2007) and Tree of Codes (2016), and the major ensemble work Extinction Events and Dawn Chorus (2018) explore themes of desire, memory, ritual transformation and the uncanny. Her genre-crossing percussion ritual/opera Atlas of the Sky (2018), is a work involving community participants of all abilities that investigates the emotional power and energy dynamics of crowds. Lim is Professor of Composition and Sculthorpe Chair of Australian Music at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney. more info: www.lizalimcomposer.com

Share this event

When and where

2.00pm - 4.00pmWednesday 30th September 2020

Contact Details

City Events Team

+44 (0)20 7040 8037

Contact the organiser