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  1. Disability Support
  2. FAQs
Current students

FAQs

How can I get support from the Disability Support service at City, University of London?

The Disability Support service is based within Learning Success. Students can book an appointment with a disability advisor or make an initial enquiry by coming to the Learning Success reception at the Student Centre (Level 2, University Building, Northampton Square), or alternatively by calling 020 7040 0246 or e-mailing disability@city.ac.uk. In order to register with the Disability Support service, students must bring medical evidence of their disability or health condition to their registration appointment.

Please note that we do not offer drop-in sessions, but operate on scheduled appointments.

How do I know if my condition is considered a 'disability'?

The Equality Act 2010 defines disability as: “a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term (12 months or more) adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities (including education)”.

Any student who believes that their performance may be affected as a result of a disability or medical condition is encouraged to disclose this to the University. This includes students with mobility difficulties, physical or sensory impairments, autistic spectrum disorders or other disabilities or long-term health conditions. It also includes those with mental health conditions or specific learning differences, such as dyslexia or dyspraxia. City, University of London has specialist Mental Health and Neurodiversity Support services to support those students.

Additionally, students with a temporary injury or illness may be entitled to receive temporary adjustments on the provision of suitable medical evidence.

Who is entitled to resonable adjustments?

Under the Equality Act 2010, reasonable adjustments are required where disabled students personally experience substantial disadvantage in comparison with non-disabled students. The measure of what is a reasonable adjustment will depend on an institution’s circumstances.

Disabled students are entitled to individual reasonable adjustments for specific requirements.

Disabled students should be actively involved in strategically identifying anticipatory adjustments, and in making decisions regarding their individual reasonable adjustments.

The Equality Act 2010 defines disability as: “a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term (12 months or more) adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities (including education)”.

Is medical evidence required, and if so, what is acceptable medical evidence?

Yes, students must provide medical evidence of their disability or health condition in order to register with and receive support from the Disability Support service. This must be a letter from a qualified healthcare professional, such as a GP, Consultant or Clinical Nurse Specialist, and it must state:

  • your diagnosis(es)
  • date of diagnosis
  • whether the condition is long or short-term
  • associated symptoms
  • if the condition fluctuates
  • how it affects you on a day-to-day basis and, mostly importantly, how it affects your studies
  • the impact any medication or treatment may have on study or attendance at University

It must be a recent letter (ordinarily no older than 6 months), printed in headed paper, signed and dated.

Any medical evidence provided in relation to a disclosed disability will be treated as confidential and will not be shared without the written permission of the student.

Should I disclose that I have a disability to the University? Why and when?

Students are strongly encouraged to disclose their disability to the University so that any necessary reasonable adjustments and support can be arranged as early as possible.

Students are encouraged to disclose their disability in their applications so that we can ensure that their requirements are properly considered in advance of the start of their courses, and that students have information about the facilities and support available at City so they can make an informed choice. Nevertheless, students can disclose their disability and engage with the Disability Support service at any time during their studies, as and when the need arises.

Will my personal information be shared with others?

Any information you disclose to us is treated confidentially and will not be shared without your permission. The disability advisor will be able to discuss with you what support may be available and who needs to know what information. You will be asked to sign a ‘Permission to Disclose Personal Information’ form stating what services or departments you allows us to share information with.

The fact that you are registered with the Disability Support service will not be stated on your degree certificate and will not be passed on to any potential future employer.

Will the fact that I have a disability influence how my exams and assessments are marked?

No. The support that is put in place for you is designed to mitigate the impact of your disability on your studies and ensure you can perform to the best of your abilities.

Will University accommodation be available after my first year?

Students with disabilities may sometimes be eligible to stay in halls of residence after their first year of undergraduate study, subject to availability, and this should be discussed with a Disability Advisor.

What will DSAs pay for?

DSAs can help with the costs of:

  • Major items of specialist equipment, e.g. a computer if you need one because of your disability
  • Specialist non-medical helpers, e.g. a specialist mentor, BSL interpretor, assistive technology trainer, mobility trainer, electronic notetaker (for deaf students), etc
  • Extra travel because of your disability
  • Other disability-related costs of studying

DSAs will not pay for your tuition fees or living costs.

Students SHOULD NOT purchase equipment or services on the assumption that funding through DSAs will be made available. Eligibility for DSAs can only be determined by Student Finance England (SFE) and entitlement to funding through DSAs will be based on the recommendations of a DSAs study needs assessor.

More information about DSAs can be found here.

How can I get exam adjustments?

As part of reasonable adjustments, some students with disabilities may be eligible for special exam arrangements, such as extra time or rest breaks. In order to receive special exam arrangements students will need to register with the Disability Support service and provide medical evidence of how their disability or health condition affects their studies. The student's entitlement to reasonable adjustments will be based on the medical evidence provided (please see above what is considered suitable medical evidence).

Students must note there are deadlines for submitting requests for special exam arrangements for each examination period (set by the Exams Office) and, therefore, are advised to register with the Disability Support service as early as possible and well in advance of the start of their exams.

I have a mental health condition - should I register with the Disability Support service?

No, in this case you should contact the Mental Health service, which is best placed to work with students with diagnosed mental health conditions. For more information about the Mental Health service and how to register with them, please click here.

I have dyslexia or another SpLD - should I register with the Disability Support service?

No, in this case you should contact the Neurodiversity Support service, which is best placed to work with students with specific learning differences, such as dyslexia or dyspraxia for example. For more information about the Neurodiversity Support service and how to register with them, please click here.

I have a physical disability/health condition as well as a mental health condition and/or SpLD - which service should I register with?

If you have multiple diagnoses it is possible to register with more than one team. In this case you should register with all the applicable services. If you are not sure which service you require support from we can help you to identify this if you send us further information about your condition(s).