Courses
  1. Undergraduate
  2. Postgraduate
  3. Research Degrees
  4. CPD
  5. Short Courses
  1. The Novel Studio
  2. What will I learn?
Courses

What will I learn?

Discover the learning outcomes and recommended reading for students enrolled on City's Novel Studio course.

Knowledge and understanding

The student will:

  • Develop skills needed for plotting, planning and researching a novel
  • Learn to apply fictional techniques to their own work
  • Identify a range of fictional forms
  • Understand the narrative frameworks of varied literary and commercial novels
  • Learn various strategies for the crucial revising and editing stages
  • Understand the benefits of a community of writers, and the feedback opportunities this engenders
  • Understand the book publishing industry through a variety of visits from writers, agents and publishers
  • Learn to apply constructive criticism to each others' work
  • Understand and demonstrate the discipline required to be a writer
  • Develop a responsiveness to language in the creation of fiction
  • Apply rhetorical skills of effective critical and creative communication, both oral and written, in the process of writing fiction
  • Research and apply findings to the planning of a sustained piece of fiction
  • Identify readerships and the wider commercial environment of the fiction market
  • Write and revise a sustained piece of fiction
  • Apply knowledge and skills to approach a literary agent and publisher
  • Present work to agents and publishers through an end-of-term reading

Transferable skills

The student will:

  • Demonstrate a capacity for independent judgement and thought
  • Practise skills in critical reasoning and appreciation
  • Produce written work to a stipulated length and deadline
  • Understand, question and apply a range of alternative perspectives

Assesment

The assessment for The Novel Studio is based entirely on course work, which covers aspects of all work undertaken throughout the year.

Recommended reading

This is a background reading list. It is not prescriptive, so students can dip into any of these books at any point in the course. The tutors will refer to a range of novels throughout, as and when it is key to the course and the students' own writing.

Texts

This is a background reading list. It is not prescriptive, so students can dip into any of these books at any point in the course. The tutors will refer to a range of novels throughout, as and when it is key to the course and the students' own writing.

  1. Athill, Diana, Stet. London: Granta
  2. Blake, Carole, From Pitch to Publication. London: Macmillan
  3. Boylan, Clare (ed.), The Agony and the Ego: The Art and Strategy of Fiction Writing Explored. London: Penguin Books.
  4. Brande, Dorothea, Becoming a Writer. London: Macmillan
  5. Forster, E.M., Aspects of the Novel. London: Penguin Books
  6. Gardner, J., On Becoming a Novelist. New York: Norton
  7. Greene, Graham, A Sort of Life. London: Penguin Books
  8. Hiney, Tom and Macshane, Frank (eds.), The Raymond Chandler Papers: Selected Letters and Non-Fiction 1909-1959. London: Penguin Books
  9. King, Stephen, On Writing. London: Pocket Books
  10. Leader, Zachary (ed.), On Modern British Fiction. Oxford: Oxford University Press
  11. Lodge, David, The Art of Fiction. London: Penguin Books
  12. Prose, Francine, Reading Like a Writer. Harper Collins
  13. Steinbeck, John, Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters. London: Penguin Books
  14. Taylor-Guthrie (ed.), Conversations with Toni Morrison. University of Mississippi Press
  15. The Paris Review Interviews: Women Writers at Work (1999) London: Harvill Press
  16. Woolf, Virginia, A Writer's Diary. London: Penguin Books