People
  1. Students
  2. Alumni
  3. Honorary Graduates
  4. Academic Experts
  1. Dr Sophie Lind
People

portrait of Dr Sophie Lind

Dr Sophie Lind

Senior Lecturer in Psychology

School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

Contact Information

Contact

Visit Dr Sophie Lind

DG10a, Rhind Building

null

Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Background

Dr Lind graduated from the University of Warwick in 2003, obtaining a first class BSc in Psychology. She was awarded her PhD in Psychology in 2008 by City University London, and subsequently completed a Post-doctoral Fellowship, funded by the charity, Autism Speaks. Dr Lind took up a Lectureship at Durham University in 2010, before returning to City University London in 2013.

Administrative roles

BSc Psychology Programme Director

Professional activities

Associate Editor of Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Research

Research interests

- Developmental psychology
- Developmental disorders (particularly autism spectrum disorder)
- Memory (particularly episodic and autobiographical memory)
- Future-oriented thinking
- Theory of mind
- Metacognition
- Self-awareness
- Spatial navigation
- Executive function

Research funding

ESRC Research Grant (07/2015-06/2018): Metacognition and mindreading: One system or two? Principal Investigator: David Williams; Co-Investigators: Sophie Lind and Peter Carruthers. £348,000

ESRC Research Grant (04/2010-09/2013): Investigating prospection, imagination, and navigation in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (RES-062-23-2192). Principal Investigator: Sophie Lind; Co-Investigator: Dermot Bowler. £351,000

Autism Speaks (USA) Postdoctoral Fellowship (04/2008-03/2010): Past, present, and future-oriented thinking about the self in autism spectrum disorder (grant #2239). US$122,000 (approximately £78,000).

PhD supervision

Dr Lind welcomes PhD applications from within any of her areas of research interest (listed above).

Current research projects

"Metacognition and Mindreading: One System or Two?” ESRC project website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/psychology/thinking/%E2%80%8B

Publications

Chapters (4)

  1. Williams, D.M. and Lind, S.E. (2012). Comorbidity and diagnosis of developmental disorders. In Marshall, C. (Ed.), Current Issues in Developmental Disorders (pp. 19–45). Hove, UK: Psychology Press. ISBN 978-1-84872-084-8.
  2. Bowler, D., Gaigg, S. and Lind, S.E. (2011). Researching the Autism Spectrum. In Roth, I. and Rezaie, P. (Eds.), Researching the Autism Spectrum: Contemporary perspectives (pp. 316–346). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-73686-2.
  3. Lind, S.E. and Williams, D.M. (2011). Behavioral, biopsychosocial, and cognitive models of autism spectrum disorders. In Matson, J.L. and Sturmey, P. (Eds.), International Handbook of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders (pp. 99–114). New York: Springer. ISBN 978-1-4419-8065-6.
  4. Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D. (2010). Episodic memory and autonoetic consciousness in autism spectrum disorders: The roles of self-awareness, representational abilities, and temporal cognition. In Boucher, J. and Bowler, D. (Eds.), Memory in Autism (pp. 166–187). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-18401-4.

Journal Articles (20)

  1. Grainger, C., Williams, D.M. and Lind, S.E. (2016). Judgment of Learning Accuracy in High-functioning Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(11), pp. 3570–3582. doi:10.1007/s10803-016-2895-1.
  2. Grainger, C., Williams, D.M. and Lind, S.E. (2016). Recognition memory and source memory in autism spectrum disorder: A study of the intention superiority and enactment effects. Autism : the international journal of research and practice .
  3. Grainger, C., Williams, D.M. and Lind, S.E. (2016). Metacognitive monitoring and control processes in children with autism spectrum disorder: Diminished judgement of confidence accuracy. Consciousness and Cognition, 42, pp. 65–74. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2016.03.003.
  4. Grisdale, E., Lind, S.E., Eacott, M.J. and Williams, D.M. (2014). Self-referential memory in autism spectrum disorder and typical development: Exploring the ownership effect. Consciousness and Cognition, 30, pp. 133–141. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2014.08.023.
  5. Lind, S.E., Bowler, D.M. and Raber, J. (2014). Spatial navigation, episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and theory of mind in children with autism spectrum disorder: Evidence for impairments in mental simulation? Frontiers in Psychology, 5(DEC) . doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01411.
  6. Grainger, C., Williams, D.M. and Lind, S.E. (2014). Metacognition, metamemory, and mindreading in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 123(3), pp. 650–659. doi:10.1037/a0036531.
  7. Williams, D.M., Jarrold, C., Grainger, C. and Lind, S.E. (2014). Diminished time-based, but undiminished event-based, prospective memory in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: Relation to working memory ability. Neuropsychology, 28(1), pp. 30–42. doi:10.1037/neu0000008.
  8. Grainger, C., Williams, D.M. and Lind, S. (2014). Online action monitoring and memory for self-performed actions in autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(5), pp. 1193–1206. doi:10.1007/s10803-013-1987-4.
  9. Lind, S., Williams, D.M., Bowler, D. and Peel, A. (2014). Episodic memory and episodic future thinking impairments in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: An underlying difficulty with scene construction or self-projection? Neuropsychology, 28(1), pp. 55–65. doi:10.1037/neu0000005.
  10. Williams, D., Boucher, J., Lind, S. and Jarrold, C. (2013). Time-based and event-based prospective memory in autism spectrum disorder: The roles of executive function, theory of mind, and time-estimation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(7), pp. 1555–1567. doi:10.1007/s10803-012-1703-9.
  11. Lind, S.E., Williams, D.M., Raber, J., Peel, A. and Bowler, D.M. (2013). Spatial navigation impairments among intellectually high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder: Exploring relations with theory of mind, episodic memory, and episodic future thinking. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 122(4), pp. 1189–1199. doi:10.1037/a0034819.
  12. Lind, S.E. and Williams, D.M. (2012). The association between past and future oriented thinking: Evidence from autism spectrum disorder. Learning and Motivation, 43(4), pp. 231–240. doi:10.1016/j.lmot.2012.05.004.
  13. Crane, L., Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2012). Remembering the past and imagining the future in autism spectrum disorder. Memory, 21(2), pp. 157–166. doi:10.1080/09658211.2012.712976.
  14. Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2010). Episodic memory and episodic future thinking in adults with autism. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 119(4), pp. 896–905. doi:10.1037/a0020631.
  15. Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2010). Impaired performance on see-know tasks amongst children with autism: Evidence of specific difficulties with theory of mind or domain-general task factors? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(4), pp. 479–484. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0889-y.
  16. Lind, S.E. (2010). Memory and the self in autism: A review and theoretical framework. Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice, 14(5), pp. 430–456. doi:10.1177/1362361309358700.
  17. Lind, S. and Bowler, D. (2009). Recognition memory, self-other source memory, and theory-of-mind in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(9), pp. 1231–1239. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0735-2.
  18. Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2009). Delayed self-recognition in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(4), pp. 643–650. doi:10.1007/s10803-008-0670-7.
  19. Lind, S.E. and Bowler, D.M. (2009). Language and theory of mind in autism spectrum disorder: The relationship between complement syntax and false belief task performance. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(6), pp. 929–937. doi:10.1007/s10803-009-0702-y.
  20. Boucher, J., Pons, F., Lind, S.E. and Williams, D. (2007). Temporal cognition in children with autistic spectrum disorders: Tests of diachronic perspective taking. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(8), pp. 1413–1429. doi:10.1007/s10803-006-0285-9.

Find us

City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

Back to top

City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.