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  1. Katerina Hilari
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portrait of Professor Katerina Hilari

Professor Katerina Hilari

Reader in Acquired Language Impairments

School of Health Sciences, Division of Language & Communication Science

Contact Information

Contact

Visit Katerina Hilari

G101, Gloucester Building

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Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Background

Katerina is Joint Senior Tutor for Research in LCS and a Reader in Acquired Language Impairment. She is also an Advisory Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. Katerina is a Speech and Language Therapist with a background in Psychology and she specialises in aphasia and the impact of aphasia on people's lives. Katerina joined City University London in 2002. She previously worked at the Royal Free Hospital in London.

Katerina studied Philosophy, Education and Psychology at the University of Athens before her post-graduate studies in Speech and Language Therapy in the UK. She worked in the NHS for St Mary's Hospital in Paddington and the Royal Free in North London. Her PhD and post-doc research was on the assessment of health-related quality of life in people with stroke and aphasia. She has developed a questionnaire, the stroke and aphasia quality of life scale (SAQOL-39) for use in clinical practice and research.

Qualifications

PhD on ‘Health-related quality of life in people with chronic aphasia’, City University London, 2002.
Certificate of attendance in MSc Advanced Social Research Methods, Department of Sociology, City University London, 2000.
MSc [incorporating Postgraduate Diploma, Grade 71%] in Speech and Language Therapy, City University London, 1996. SLT professional qualification.
BA/Ptychion in Philosophy, Education and Psychology (Major in Psychology; Grade: 8.3 out of 10), School of Philosophy, University of Athens, 1991.

- Member of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RC0011164)
- Member of the Health Professions Council (SL05481)

Employment

2011 - : Reader in Acquired Language Impairments, Division of Language and Communication Science (LCS), City University London
2005-2010: Senior Lecturer, LCS, City University London.
2004 - 2008: Senior Research Fellow LCS, City University London.
2002 - 2005: Lecturer in Communication Disabilities, LCS, City University London.
1999 - 2002: Visiting Lecturer and PhD student, LCS, City University London.
1997 - 1999: Specialist Speech and Language Therapist in Care of the Elderly and Head & Neck Cancer/ENT, Royal Free NHS Hospital, London.
1996 - 1997: Speech and Language Therapist, Acquired Neurological and ENT disorders, St Mary’s NHS Hospital, London.

Awards

2011 City University London Staff Prize for Excellence in Research

2010 Teaching Recognition Prize to the Division of Language and Communication Science Professional Studies Team, City University London.

1988-1991 Papathakis grant: awarded through nationwide university student exams, Greece.

1987 National award (IKY) for outstanding achievement in the Pan-Hellenic University Admissions Exams [1919 out of 2000 points], Greece.

External Profile

- Advisory Editorial Board member, International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders.

- External Examiner, University of Newcastle

- HTA Clinical Evaluation and Trials College of Experts

- Grant proposal referee for the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA); NIHR Research for Patient Benefit, and other funding bodies including the Stroke Association and the Health Foundation.

- Reviewer for scientific journals, including Age and Ageing, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Aphasiology, Clinical Rehabilitation, Disability and Rehabilitation, European Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry,  Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Quality of Life Research, Stroke.

- Aphasia Committee of International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP)

- Advisory Committee of AphasiaUnited http://www.aphasiaunited.org

University Leadership and Administration

- University Senior Tutor for Research forum
- School of Health Sciences Research Degrees Programme Committee
- School of Health Sciences Research Sustainability Fund Committee
- Division of Language and Communication Science Ethics Proportionate Review Committee
- Division of Language and Communication Science Strategy Committee
- Division of Language and Communication Science Research Committee

Research

Research overview

Katerina's research is focused on two main areas:

1. The long-term impact and psychosocial aspects of adult neurological conditions, with an emphasis on stroke and aphasia. This covers both exploration of this impact, with current projects looking at ways to support emotional and social well-being for people with aphasia, and also methodological issues, such as instrument development and adaptation for people with aphasia.

2. The effectiveness of speech and language therapy on activities, participation and quality of life, in particular for people with aphasia. Katerina is co-investigator in the Thales Aphasia project, an interdisciplinary study of aphasia, which includes a multicentre controlled trial of aphasia therapy (elaborated semantic features analysis) in Greece.

Research areas

- Quality of life assessment in people with communication disabilities
- Stroke and aphasia outcomes research
- Development, psychometric testing and cultural adaptation of quality of life and related measures
- Social network and social support after stroke
- Effectiveness of aphasia therapy on activities, participation and quality of life
- Promoting psychosocial wellbeing in people with stroke and aphasia

Grants

List of current and recent grants

- 2012-2015 Varlokosta S. (PI), Oikonomou A., Papathanasiou I., Hilari K., Tsapkini K. et al. Levels of impairment in Greek aphasia: relationship with processing deficits, brain region and therapeutic implications. The Greek Ministry for Education and Lifelong Learning: Thales call. €;600,000

- 2013-2014 Hilari K (PI), Northcott S. Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) with people with stroke and aphasia to improve mood / psychological health and satisfaction with social relationships. City University London Research Sustainability Fund, £9,840

- 2012-2014 Harrison K. (PI), Hilari K. Lee Silverman Voice Therapy for speech difficulties in Parkinson’s Disease – is it effective when delivered by students? City University London Pump Priming Award, £4,699.10

- 2007-2010 Petchey R. (PI), Devlin N., Hilari K., Lawrenson J., McPherson K., Needle J., Scriven A., Weinberg J. The role of Allied Health Professionals in health promotion. NIHR HS&DR Programme (Public Health Limited Open Call Scheme) £150,000.

- 2004-2008 Assessing health-related quality of life after stroke. Principal Investigator (PI). Personal Post-doctoral Fellowship. The Consortium for Healthcare Research of the Health Foundation £134,000.


In recent years, Katerina has completed a project funded by the Consortium for Healthcare Research of the Health Foundation on the long-term impact of stroke and aphasia on people's lives (see e.g. Hilari and Byng 2009; Hilari et al., 2010; Hilari, 2011) and the further development of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39, Hilari et al., 2009; Hilari and Boreham, 2013; and also related publications Efstratiadou et al., 2012, Ignatiou et al., 2012, Caute et al., 2012). She was also a co-investigator on an NIHR HS&DR Programme grant on the role of allied health professionals in health promotion (Needle et al., 2011). She also led and completed a systematic review on predictors of health-related quality of life in people with aphasia (Hilari et al 2012).

Principal external collaborators

- Dr Spyridoula Varlokosta, Associate Professor of Psycholinguistics, University of Athens
- Dr Ilias Papathanasiou, Associate Professor TEI Patras
- Dr Shirley Thomas, Senior Lecturer, University of Nottingham
- Professor Marit Kirkevold, University of Oslo

Past collaborators include

- Professor Sally Byng
- Professor Donna Lamping
- Professor Dick Wiggins
- Dr Sarah Smith

Research Students

Name
Eva Efstratiadou
Thesis Title
Investigation of different therapy approaches for aphasia in the Greek language
Further Information
- 1st Supervisor
- 2nd supervisor: Dr Ilias Papathanasiou (external)

- This study investigates the effectiveness of speech and language therapy, delivered through different approaches for Greek speaking people with aphasia in Greece. Two different therapy approaches are examined: a) direct (one-to-one therapy) and b) combination therapy (one-to-one and group therapy). The study explores the outcomes of each therapy approach and which one, if any, has the greatest positive effects on quality of life.
Name
Lara Galante
Thesis Title
Cultural adaptation and psychometric testing of the Scenario Test for use in the UK, with insight on cognitive aspects of independent communication
Further Information
- 1st supervisor
- 2nd supervisor: Dr Lucy Dipper

- This project is testing the psychometric properties of The Scenario Test for use in the UK. The Scenario Test was originally developed in The Netherlands and it is a functional communication test for people with aphasia that taps on all forms of communication, such as speech, gesture, drawing and writing. Furthermore, the project will investigate the relationship between cognitive factors ('executive attention') and the ability to independently communicate using both verbal and non-verbal methods.
Name
Becky Moss
Thesis Title
Investigating the impact of using assistive technologies on communication and social participation for people with aphasia: a mixed methods, case series study
Further Information
- 1st supervisor
- 2nd supervisor: Dr Celia Woolf
- 3rd supervisor: Professor Jane Marshall

- This project will deliver and evaluate a training programme in which ten people with aphasia will be taught to use assistive technologies including voice recognition software and text-to-speech software, with the aim of improving their ability to communicate through written language. Training will be one-to-one, for approximately one hour a week, for 10-15 weeks, and activities will be tailored to address individual participants' goals such as correspondence through emails or letters.
Name
Sarah Northcott
Thesis Title
Social support after a stroke
Further Information
- 1st supervisor
- 2nd supervisor: Professor Jane Marshall
- External advisor: Dr Jane Ritchie

- This study looks at what happens to social networks and patterns of social support after stroke. It is a repeated-measures cohort study of people admitted to two NHS hospitals with stroke within a 15 month period, with questionnaires administered at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months post stroke. 87 participants were recruited, with 82% follow up rate to 6 months. In-depth qualitative interviews were also carried out 8-15 months post stroke with 29 participants, exploring why changes were occurring and how they were perceived.
Name
Celia Harding
Thesis Title
Unmet needs of children with feeding difficulties
Further Information
- 2nd supervisor
- 1st supervisor: Dr Nicola Botting

- This project comprises a series of studies on early feeding and communication, including a randomised controlled trial on the effectiveness of non-nutritive sucking as a tool for enabling transition to full oral feeding with premature babies.
Name
Ruth Deutsch
Thesis Title
Exploration of psychometric properties in the Cognitive Abilities Profile
Further Information
- 3rd supervisor
- 1st supervisor: Dr Nicola Botting

- Ruth is an educational psychologist and her PhD examines the reliability, validity and perceptions of the Cognitive Abilities Profile (CAP). The CAP is an educational consultation tool for identifying strengths and weaknesses in children with educational needs.

Publications

  1. Northcott, S., Simpson, A., Moss, B., Ahmed, N. and Hilari, K. (2017). How do speech-and-language therapists address the psychosocial well-being of people with aphasia? Results of a UK online survey. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 52(3), pp. 356–373. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12278.
  2. Northcott, S., Hirani, S.P. and Hilari, K. (2017). A Typology to Explain Changing Social Networks Post Stroke. The Gerontologist . doi:10.1093/geront/gnx011.
  3. Botting, N., Dipper, L. and Hilari, K. (2017). The effect of social media promotion on academic article uptake. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(3), pp. 795–800. doi:10.1002/asi.23704.
  4. Kladouchou, V., Papathanasiou, I., Efstratiadou, E.A., Christaki, V. and Hilari, K. (2017). Treatment integrity of elaborated semantic feature analysis aphasia therapy delivered in individual and group settings. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12311.
  5. Hilari, K. and Northcott, S. (2016). “Struggling to stay connected”: comparing the social relationships of healthy older people and people with stroke and aphasia. Aphasiology pp. 1–14. doi:10.1080/02687038.2016.1218436.
  6. Northcott, S., Moss, B., Harrison, K. and Hilari, K. (2016). A systematic review of the impact of stroke on social support and social networks: Associated factors and patterns of change. Clinical Rehabilitation, 30(8), pp. 811–831. doi:10.1177/0269215515602136.
  7. Marshall, J., Booth, T., Devane, N., Galliers, J., Greenwood, H., Hilari, K., Talbot, R., Wilson, S. and Woolf, C. (2016). Evaluating the benefits of aphasia intervention delivered in virtual reality: Results of a quasi-randomised study. PLoS ONE, 11(8) . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0160381.
  8. Northcott, S., Marshall, J. and Hilari, K. (2016). What factors predict who will have a strong social network following a stroke? Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research . doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0201.
  9. Govender, R., Lee, M.T., Drinnan, M., Davies, T., Twinn, C. and Hilari, K. (2016). Psychometric evaluation of the Swallowing Outcomes after Laryngectomy (SOAL) patient-reported outcome measure. Head and Neck, 38, pp. E1639–E1645. doi:10.1002/hed.24291.
  10. Hilari, K., Klippi, A., Constantinidou, F., Horton, S., Penn, C., Raymer, A., Wallace, S., Zemva, N. and Worrall, L. (2015). An International Perspective on Quality of Life in Aphasia: A Survey of Clinician Views and Practices from Sixteen Countries. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 119–130. doi:10.1159/000434748.

Book

  1. Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (2011). The impact of communication disability across the lifespan. Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (Eds.), London: J&R Press ISBN 978-1-907826-03-0.

Chapters (7)

  1. Hilari, K. (2011). Aphasia. In Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (Eds.), The impact of communication disability across the lifespan. (pp. 147–160). London: J&R Press ISBN 978-1-907826-03-0.
  2. Hilari, K. and Cruice, M. (2011). Quality of life approach in aphasia. In Papathanasiou, I., Coppens, P. and Potagas, C. (Eds.), Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders Jones & Bartlett Publishers. ISBN 978-0-7637-7100-3.
  3. Marshal, J., Cruice, M. and Hilari, K. (2010). Communication. In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing (pp. 184–204). Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. Herman, R.C. and Morgan, G. (2010). Deafness, language & communication. In Botting, N. and Hilari, K. (Eds.), The Impact of Communication Disability Across the Lifespan London, England: J & R Press ISBN 978-1-907826-03-0.
  5. Marshall, J., Hilari, K., Cruice, M. and Harrison, K. (2010). Communication. In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing (pp. 184–204). Wiley-Blackwell.
  6. Botting, N. and Hilari, K. Communication disability across the lifespan: the importance of documenting and sharing kholedge about wider impacts. In Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (Eds.), The impact of communication disability across the lifespan (pp. 1–5). London: J&R Press ISBN 978-1-907826-03-0.
  7. Marshall, J., Hilari, K., Cruice, M. and Harrison, K. Acute Stroke Nursing (second edition). In Williams, J., Perry, L. and Watkins, C. (Eds.), Acute Stroke Nursing Wiley-Blackwell.

Journal Articles (43)

  1. Northcott, S., Simpson, A., Moss, B., Ahmed, N. and Hilari, K. (2017). Supporting people with aphasia to 'settle into a new way to be': speech and language therapists' views on providing psychosocial support. International journal of language & communication disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12323.
  2. Northcott, S. and Hilari, K. (2017). “I’ve got somebody there, someone cares”: what support is most valued following a stroke? Disability and Rehabilitation pp. 1–10. doi:10.1080/09638288.2017.1337242.
  3. Northcott, S., Simpson, A., Moss, B., Ahmed, N. and Hilari, K. (2017). How do speech-and-language therapists address the psychosocial well-being of people with aphasia? Results of a UK online survey. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 52(3), pp. 356–373. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12278.
  4. Northcott, S., Hirani, S.P. and Hilari, K. (2017). A Typology to Explain Changing Social Networks Post Stroke. The Gerontologist . doi:10.1093/geront/gnx011.
  5. Botting, N., Dipper, L. and Hilari, K. (2017). The effect of social media promotion on academic article uptake. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(3), pp. 795–800. doi:10.1002/asi.23704.
  6. Kladouchou, V., Papathanasiou, I., Efstratiadou, E.A., Christaki, V. and Hilari, K. (2017). Treatment integrity of elaborated semantic feature analysis aphasia therapy delivered in individual and group settings. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12311.
  7. Pritchard, M., Hilari, K., Cocks, N. and Dipper, L. (2017). Reviewing the quality of discourse information measures in aphasia. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12318.
  8. McKean, C., Bloch, S., Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (2016). Editorial. International journal of language & communication disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12304.
  9. Hilari, K. and Northcott, S. (2016). “Struggling to stay connected”: comparing the social relationships of healthy older people and people with stroke and aphasia. Aphasiology pp. 1–14. doi:10.1080/02687038.2016.1218436.
  10. Northcott, S., Moss, B., Harrison, K. and Hilari, K. (2016). A systematic review of the impact of stroke on social support and social networks: Associated factors and patterns of change. Clinical Rehabilitation, 30(8), pp. 811–831. doi:10.1177/0269215515602136.
  11. Marshall, J., Booth, T., Devane, N., Galliers, J., Greenwood, H., Hilari, K., Talbot, R., Wilson, S. and Woolf, C. (2016). Evaluating the benefits of aphasia intervention delivered in virtual reality: Results of a quasi-randomised study. PLoS ONE, 11(8) . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0160381.
  12. Northcott, S., Marshall, J. and Hilari, K. (2016). What factors predict who will have a strong social network following a stroke? Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research . doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-15-0201.
  13. van Ewijk, L., Versteegde, L., Raven-Takken, E. and Hilari, K. (2016). Measuring quality of life in Dutch people with aphasia: development and psychometric evaluation of the SAQOL-39NL. Aphasiology . doi:10.1080/02687038.2016.1168919.
  14. Govender, R., Lee, M.T., Drinnan, M., Davies, T., Twinn, C. and Hilari, K. (2016). Psychometric evaluation of the Swallowing Outcomes after Laryngectomy (SOAL) patient-reported outcome measure. Head and Neck, 38, pp. E1639–E1645. doi:10.1002/hed.24291.
  15. McKean, C., Bloch, S., Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (2016). Editorial. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders . doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12304.
  16. Hilari, K., Klippi, A., Constantinidou, F., Horton, S., Penn, C., Raymer, A., Wallace, S., Zemva, N. and Worrall, L. (2015). An International Perspective on Quality of Life in Aphasia: A Survey of Clinician Views and Practices from Sixteen Countries. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 119–130. doi:10.1159/000434748.
  17. Hilari, K., Cruice, M., Sorin-Peters, R. and Worrall, L. (2015). Quality of Life in Aphasia: State of the Art. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 114–118. doi:10.1159/000440997.
  18. Northcott, S., Burns, K., Simpson, A. and Hilari, K. (2015). 'Living with Aphasia the Best Way i Can': A Feasibility Study Exploring Solution-Focused Brief Therapy for People with Aphasia. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 67(3), pp. 156–167. doi:10.1159/000439217.
  19. Harding, C., Frank, L., Botting, N. and Hilari, K. (2015). Assessment and management of infant feeding. Infant, 11(3), pp. 85–89.
  20. Winkler, M., Bedford, V., Northcott, S. and Hilari, K. (2014). Aphasia blog talk: How does stroke and aphasia affect the carer and their relationship with the person with aphasia? Aphasiology . doi:10.1080/02687038.2014.928665.
  21. Fotiadou, D., Northcott, S., Chatzidaki, A. and Hilari, K. (2014). Aphasia blog talk: How does stroke and aphasia affect a person’s social relationships? Aphasiology . doi:10.1080/02687038.2014.928664.
  22. Harding, C., Frank, L., Van Someren, V., Hilari, K. and Botting, N. (2014). How does non-nutritive sucking support infant feeding? Infant Behavior and Development, 37(4), pp. 457–464. doi:10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.05.002.
  23. Northcott, S. and Hilari, K. (2013). Stroke Social Network Scale: Development and psychometric evaluation of a new patient-reported measure. Clinical Rehabilitation, 27(9), pp. 823–833. doi:10.1177/0269215513479388.
  24. Hilari, K. and Boreham, L.-.D. (2013). Visual analogue scales in stroke: What can they tell us about health-related quality of life? BMJ Open, 3(9) . doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003309.
  25. Ignatiou, M., Christaki, V., Chelas, E.N., Efstratiadou, E.A. and Hilari, K. (2012). Agreement between People with Aphasia and Their Proxies on Health-Related Quality of Life after Stroke, Using the Greek SAQOL-39g. Psychology, 3(9), pp. 686–690. doi:10.4236/psych.2012.39104.
  26. Caute, A., Northcott, S., Clarkson, L., Pring, T. and Hilari, K. (2012). Does mode of administration affect health-related quality-of-life outcomes after stroke? Int J Speech Lang Pathol . doi:10.3109/17549507.2012.663789.
  27. Efstratiadou, E.A., Chelas, E.N., Ignatiou, M., Christaki, V., Papathanasiou, I. and Hilari, K. (2012). Quality of life after stroke: evaluation of the Greek SAQOL-39g. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 64(4) . doi:10.1159/000340014.
  28. Hilari, K., Needle, J.J. and Harrison, K. (2012). What are the important factors in health-related quality of life for people with aphasia? A systematic review. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, In press .
  29. Northcott, S. and Hilari, K. (2011). Why do people lose their friends after a stroke? Int J Lang Commun Disord, 46(5), pp. 524–534. doi:10.1111/j.1460-6984.2011.00079.x.
  30. Hilari, K. (2011). The impact of stroke: are people with aphasia different to those without? Disabil Rehabil, 33(3), pp. 211–218. doi:10.3109/09638288.2010.508829.
  31. Lee, M.T., Gibson, S. and Hilari, K. (2010). Gender differences in health-related quality of life following total laryngectomy. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 45(3), pp. 287–294. doi:10.3109/13682820902994218.
  32. Hilari, K., Northcott, S., Roy, P., Marshall, J., Wiggins, R.D., Chataway, J. and Ames, D. (2010). Psychological distress after stroke and aphasia: the first six months. Clin Rehabil, 24(2), pp. 181–190. doi:10.1177/0269215509346090.
  33. Kerr, J., Hilari, K. and Litosseliti, L. (2010). Information needs after stroke: What to include and how to structure it on a website. A qualitative study using focus groups and card sorting. APHASIOLOGY, 24(10), pp. 1170–1196. doi:10.1080/02687030903383738.
  34. Hilari, K., Lamping, D.L., Smith, S.C., Northcott, S., Lamb, A. and Marshall, J. (2009). Psychometric properties of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) in a generic stroke population. Clin Rehabil, 23(6), pp. 544–557. doi:10.1177/0269215508101729.
  35. Hilari, K. and Byng, S. (2009). Health-related quality of life in people with severe aphasia. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 44(2), pp. 193–205. doi:10.1080/13682820802008820.
  36. Kartsona, A. and Hilari, K. (2007). Quality of life in aphasia: Greek adaptation of the stroke and aphasia quality of life scale - 39 item (SAQOL-39). Eura Medicophys, 43(1), pp. 27–35.
  37. Hilari, K., Owen, S. and Farrelly, S.J. (2007). Proxy and self-report agreement on the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 78(10), pp. 1072–1075.
  38. Hilari, K. and Northcott, S. (2006). Social support in people with chronic aphasia. APHASIOLOGY, 20(1), pp. 17–36. doi:10.1080/02687030500279982.
  39. Hilari, K. (2005). Choosing relevant outcomes for aphasia: A commentary on Ross and Wertz, "Advancing appraisal: Aphasia and the WHO". Aphasiology, 19(9), pp. 870–875. doi:10.1080/02687030544000038.
  40. Hilari, K., Byng, S., Lamping, D.L. and Smith, S.C. (2003). Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 (SAQOL-39): evaluation of acceptability, reliability, and validity. Stroke, 34(8), pp. 1944–1950. doi:10.1161/01.STR.0000081987.46660.ED.
  41. Hilari, K., Wiggins, R.D., Roy, P., Byng, S. and Smith, S.C. (2003). Predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in people with chronic aphasia. Aphasiology, 17(4), pp. 365–381. doi:10.1080/02687030244000725.
  42. Hilari, K. and Byng, S. (2001). Measuring quality of life in people with aphasia: the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 36 Suppl, pp. 86–91.
  43. Hilari, K., Byng, S. and Pring, T. (2001). Measuring well-being in aphasia: The GHQ-28 versus the NHP. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 3(2), pp. 129–137. doi:10.3109/14417040109003719.

Report

  1. Needle, J.J., Petchey, R.P., Benson, J., Scriven, A., Lawrenson, J. and Hilari, K. (2011). The role of allied health professionals in health promotion..

Education

Educational Leadership:

Joint Senior Tutor for Research for Research Degrees (MPhil/PhD) in Centre for Language and Communication Sciences Research. See http://www.city.ac.uk/courses/research-degrees/research-degrees-at-the-school-of-health-sciences

Undergraduate Modules:

- SL3001 Research Methods and Evidence-based Practice

Postgraduate Modules:

- SLM006 Research Methods and Evidence-based Practice
- SLM010 Professional Studies

MSc Modules:

- HCM001 Acquired Language Impairment

Other Activities

Editorial Activities (2)

  1. 2015 - Member of Advisory Editorial Board, International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders..
  2. 2005 - 2015 Editor in Chief, International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders.

Events/Conferences (75)

  1. Papathanasiou I., Archonti A., Efstratiadou E., Atsidakou M., and Hilari K. (2014) Semantic feature analysis: an approach to treat comprehension deficits? Orlando, Florida (2014).
    Description: ASHA Annual Convention, 20-22 November, Orlando, Florida. Poster presentation.
  2. Galante L., Hilari K., and Dipper L. (2014) Cultural adaptation and psychometric testing of the Scenario Test for people with aphasia, including cognitive aspects of effective, independent communication. The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Poster presentation.
  3. Moss B., Woolf C., Marshall J., and Hilari K. (2014) Can assistive technologies compensate for writing and reading deficits and increase social participation for people with acquired aphasia after stroke? The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Poster presentation.
  4. Winkler M., Bedford V., Northcott S., and Hilari K. (2014) Aphasia blog talk: How does stroke and aphasia affect the carer and their relationship with the person with aphasia? The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Poster presentation.
  5. Chatzidaki A., Fotiadou D., Northcott S., and Hilari K. (2014) Aphasia blog talk: The impact of stroke and aphasia on relationships with family, friends and the wider social network. The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Poster presentation.
  6. Northcott S., and Hilari K. (2014) Spouse, children, friends: who provides what support, and how is this perceived by the stroke survivor? The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Poster presentation.
  7. Papathanasiou I., Archonti A., Efstratiadou E., Atsidakou M., and Hilari K. (2014) Semantic feature analysis: an approach to treat comprehension deficits? The Hague (2014).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference 2014, The Hague, 18-20 June. Oral presentation.
  8. Northcott S. & Hilari K. (2014) ‘Living with aphasia the best way I can’: a feasibility study exploring solution focused brief therapy for people with aphasia. Birmingham, UK (2014).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium, 4-5 September, Birmingham University, UK. Oral presentation.
  9. Hilari K., Efstratiadou E., Ignatiou M., Christaki V., Chelas E. & Papathanasiou I. The Stroke & Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL-39) in Greek: Psychometric Evaluation. Chicago, USA (2013).
    Description: ASHA 2013 Convention. Poster presentation
  10. Papathanasiou I., Efstratiadou E., Archonti A. & Hilari K. Elaborated Semantic Feature Analysis Treatment for Anomia: A Case Study in a Nonfluent Aphasic. Chicago, USA (2013).
    Description: ASHA 2013 Convention. Poster presentation
  11. Efstratiadoi E., Papathanasiou I. & Hilari K. Investigation of different therapy approaches for aphasia in the Greek language. Manchester, UK (2013).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Oral presentation
  12. Hilari K. & Boreham L.D. Visual Analogue Scales in Stroke: What can they tell us about health-related quality of life. (2013).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster presentation
  13. Northcott S. & Hilari K. What factors predict who will feel well supported and have a strong social network six months post stroke? Manchester, UK (2013).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Oral presentations
  14. Northcott S. & Hilari K. Stroke Social Network Scale: development and psychometric evaluation of a new patient-reported measure. Manchester, UK (2013).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster presentation
  15. Hilari K. and Penn C. Quality of life in aphasia: conceptualization, measurement and current knowledge. Turin, Italy (2013).
    Description: International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 29th World Congress
  16. Klippi A., Penn C., Constantinidou F., Zemva N., Hilari K., Horton S., Raymer A., Worrall L. An international survey on quality of life in aphasia: results from 16 countries. Turin, Italy (2013).
    Description: International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 29th World Congress
  17. Hilari K The impact of stroke and aphasia on people's lives. University of Athens, Athens Greece (2013).
    Description: Thales interdisciplinary study of aphasia study day. Oral presentation (Invited)
  18. Hilari K The impact of aphasia on people's lives. City University London, London, UK (2011).
    Description: Festival of Social Sciences Event, 3 November. Oral presentation (Invited)
  19. Hilari K. and Northcott S. Predictors of emotional distress in people with stroke and aphasia. Reading, UK (2011).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster presentation
  20. Hilari K., Needle J., and Harrison K. What are the important factors in health-related quality of life for people with aphasia? A systematic review. Reading, UK (2011).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Oral presentation
  21. Northcott S. and Hilari K. The impact of aphasia on friendships post-stroke. Reading, UK (2011).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster presentation
  22. Hilari K, Efstratiadou E, Ignatiou M, Christaki V, and Chelas EN. The Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale in Greek: Psychometric evaluation. Glasgow, UK (2010).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster Presentation
  23. Hilari K. Stroke outcomes: comparing people with aphasia to those without. Oslo, Norway (2010).
    Description: Aphasia Days in Norway, Bredtvet Resource Centre
  24. Hilari K. Psychosocial impact of stroke and aphasia. Oslo, Norway (2010).
    Description: Aphasia Days in Norway, Bredtvet Resource Centre
  25. Hilari K. The challenge of severe aphasia. Oslo, Norway (2010).
    Description: Aphasia Days in Norway, Bredtvet Resource Centre
  26. Hilari K. Quality of life measures workshop. Oslo, Norway (2010).
    Description: Aphasia Days in Norway, Bredtvet Resource Centre
  27. Norman C. & Hilari K. Communication for people with severe aphasia in acute stroke wards: What factors affect the use of communication charts? Newcastle, UK (2010).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium. Poster presentation
  28. Kerr J. & Hilari K. Structuring information on a website for people with stroke and aphasia. Newcastle, UK (2010).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Therapy Symposium. Poster presentation
  29. Hilari K. & Marshall J. Aphasia assessment and student supervision. London, UK (2010).
    Description: Clinical Education Conference
  30. Hilari K., Christaki V., Ignatiou M., & Kartsona A. The stroke and aphasia quality of life scale (SAQOL-39) in Greek: Cultural adaptation, reliability and proxy and self-report agreement. Athens, Greece (2010).
    Description: 28th International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP) Congress. Oral presentation
  31. Hilari K., Marshall J. & Papathanasiou I. Aphasia symposium on Intervention approaches to acquired neurogenic language and communication disorders. Athens, Greece (2010).
    Description: 28th International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP) Congress
  32. Hilari K Stroke outcomes for people with and without aphasia. UCL, London, UK (2010).
    Description: Social Perspectives in Acquired Communication Disorders Colloquium. Oral presentation (Invited)
  33. Kerr J., Hilari K. & Litosseliti L. Website information structuring for people with stroke and aphasia. Sheffield, UK (2009).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial International Conference. Poster presentation
  34. Hilari K. The impact of stroke for people with and without aphasia. Sheffield, UK (2009).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial International Conference. Oral presentation
  35. Hilari K. & Marshall J. Aphasia Therapy Case Studies: Comprehension and expression of speech. Athens, Greece (2008).
    Description: Language and Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Conference, 28th IALP Congress - Athens 2010 Pre-congress event
  36. Hilari K. Psychosocial approaches to aphasia. Athens, Greece (2008).
    Description: Language and Communication Disorders in Children and Adults Conference, 28th IALP Congress - Athens 2010 Pre-congress event
  37. Hilari K., Lamping D.L., Smith S.C., Northcott S., Lamb A., Marshall J. Assessing quality of life in people with and without aphasia. Vienna, Austria (2008).
    Description: 6th World Stroke Congress. Poster presentation
  38. Hilari K. & Byng S. Quality of life in severe aphasia. Ljubljana, Slovenia (2008).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Oral presentation
  39. Hilari K., Lamb A., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L., Smith S.C., Wiggins R.D. Psychometric properties of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39) in a generic stroke population. Ljubljana, Slovenia (2008).
    Description: International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Poster presentation
  40. Hilari K., Lamb A., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L., Smith S.C., Wiggins R.D. Psychometric properties of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39) in a generic stroke population. Harrogate, UK (2007).
    Description: UK Stroke Forum Conference. Poster presentation
  41. Hilari K., Owen S., Farrelly S.J. Proxy and self-report agreement on the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39). Harrogate, UK (2007).
    Description: UK Stroke Forum Conference. Poster presentation
  42. Hilari K Measuring outcomes: what, when, for whom and why. City University London, London, UK (2007).
    Description: Department of Language and Communication Science Research Half-Day. Oral presentation
  43. Hilari K., Lamb A., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L., Smith S.C., Wiggins R.D. Psychometric properties of the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39) in a generic stroke population. Toronto, Canada (2007).
    Description: 14th Annual Conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Research. Poster presentation
  44. Hilari K., Owen S. & Farrelly S.J. Proxy and self-report agreement on the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39). Edinburgh, UK (2007).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Poster presentation
  45. Hilari K., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L., Smith S.C. & Wiggins R.D. Health related quality of life after stroke. Edinburgh, UK (2007).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society Biennial Conference. Oral presentation
  46. K. Hilari, S. Northcott, J. Marshall, D. L. Lamping, S. C. Smith, R.D. Wiggins Validation of the SAQOL-39 with stroke. Copenhagen, Denmark (2007).
    Description: 27th World Congress of International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics. Poster presentation
  47. Northcott S. & Hilari K. Social support after stroke. Copenhagen, Denmark (2007).
    Description: 27th World Congress of International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics. Poster presentation
  48. Hilari K. Acute stroke outcomes and health related quality of life. City University London, London, UK (2007).
    Description: Department of Language and Communication Science Research Seminar. Oral presentation
  49. Hilari K. Stroke outcomes and health related quality of life. London (2007).
    Description: Oral presentation to the Stroke Unit Multidisciplinary Team of St Mary's NHS Hospital
  50. Hilari K., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L, Smith S.C. & Wiggins R.D. Acute stroke outcome and health-related quality of life. Cumberland Lodge, Windsor, UK (2006).
    Description: Consortium for Healthcare Research Retreat. Oral presentation
  51. Hilari K., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L, Smith S.C. & Wiggins R.D. How can we capture the impact of stroke. Cardiff, UK (2006).
    Description: Research Capacity Building for Nurses, Midwives and Allied Health Professionals Showcase Conference. Oral presentation
  52. Dockrell J. & Hilari K. Making new connections 2. London, UK (2006).
    Description: Poster discussion. 'Making New Connections 2' Conference. Oral presentation
  53. Hilari K., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L, Smith S.C. & Wiggins R.D. Health-related quality of life after strok. London, UK (2006).
    Description: 'Making New Connections 2' Conference. Poster presentation
  54. Northcott S. & Hilari K. The role of social support after a stroke. London, UK (2006).
    Description: 'Making New Connections 2' Conference. Poster presentation
  55. Hilari K., Northcott S., Marshall J., Lamping D.L, Smith S.C. & Wiggins R.D. Assessing health-related quality of life after stroke. Belfast, Ireland (2006).
    Description: 'Realising the vision' Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists Conference. Poster presentation
  56. Northcott S. & Hilari K. The role of social support after a stroke. Belfast, Ireland (2006).
    Description: 'Realising the vision' Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists Conference. Poster presentation
  57. Northcott S. & Hilari K. Social support in stroke and aphasia. City University London, London, UK (2005).
    Description: Research Day, LCS Department. Oral presentation
  58. Hilari K. & Northcott S. Social support and HRQL in people with Aphasia. Hong Kong, China (2004).
    Description: International Society for Quality of Life Research 11th Annual Conference. Poster presentation
  59. Northcott S. & Hilari K. Social support in chronic aphasia. Milos, Greece (2004).
    Description: 11th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference. Oral presentation
  60. Hilari K. Developing a health related quality of life scale for people with aphasia. London, UK (2004).
    Description: Connect Quality of Life Conference. Oral presentation
  61. Hilari K. Assessing quality of life in stroke. City University London, London, UK (2004).
    Description: Aphasia seminar, Department of Language and Communication Science. Oral presentation
  62. Law J. & Hilari K Research Seminar. London, UK (2004).
    Description: Barts and the London PCT. Oral presentation (Invited)
  63. Hilari K. Getting started in research. London, UK (2004).
    Description: Research Away Day. Westminster, Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea PCTs (Invited)
  64. Hilari K., Byng S., Lamping D., & Smith S Health-related quality of life outcomes in aphasia: the Stroke and Aphasia. Edinburgh, UK (2003).
    Description: Quality of Life Scale. CPLOL Conference. Poster presentation
  65. Hilari K., Wiggins R.D., Roy P., Byng S. and Smith S.C. Health-related quality of life in people with chronic aphasia. Newcastle, UK (2003).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society (BAS) Biennial Conference. Oral presentation
  66. Hilari K., Byng S., Lamping D., & Smith S Health-related quality of life outcomes: the Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale. Royal Free Hospital, London, UK (2003).
    Description: 3rd Annual Stroke Conference: Back to life after stroke. Poster presentation
  67. Hilari K. How to read a paper. London, UK (2003).
    Description: Seminar, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital SLT team. Oral presentation (Invited)
  68. Hilari K., Byng S., Lamping D., & Smith S The stroke and aphasia quality of life scale-39 item version (SAQOL-39): Evaluation of acceptability, reliability and validity. Florida, USA (2002).
    Description: International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL) conference. Poster presentation
  69. Hilari K. Health related quality of life in people with aphasia. City University London, London, UK (2002).
    Description: Department of Language and Communication Science Departmental Seminar. Oral presentation (Invited)
  70. Hilari K. & Byng S. Quality of Life in Aphasia: How to Assess? Symposium on 'International Approaches on Quality of Life'. Exeter, UK (2001).
    Description: British Aphasiology Society (BAS) Biennial Conference. Oral presentation
  71. Hilari K. & Byng S. HRQOL in People with Aphasia: Preliminary Findings from a Pilot Study. Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2001).
    Description: International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL) conference. Poster presentation
  72. Hilari K. & Byng S. Measuring Quality of Life in Aphasia: The Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale. Birmingham, UK (2001).
    Description: Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) Conference. Oral presentation
  73. Byng S., Hilari K., & Parr S. Ways of investigating psychosocial issues following stroke: a comparative guide for therapists. Birmingham, UK (2001).
    Description: Workshop. Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) Conference. Oral presentation
  74. Hilari K. Modification of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale for People with Aphasia. Vancouver, Canada (2000).
    Description: International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL) conference. Poster presentation
  75. Hilari K. Health related quality of life in people with long-term aphasia following stroke. City University London, London, UK (2000).
    Description: Research Day. Oral presentation

Keynote Lecture/Speech

  1. Hilari K. An interdisciplinary perspective on the impact of aphasia: what are the issues and how can we address them. Athens, Greece (2012). 12th Panhellenic Congress for Speech and Language Therapists

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City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.