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  1. Dr Anke Plagnol
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portrait of Dr Anke Plagnol

Dr Anke Plagnol

Lecturer in Psychology (Behaviour Eco)

School of Arts and Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

Contact Information

Contact

Visit Dr Anke Plagnol

D332, Rhind Building

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Postal Address

City, University of London
Northampton Square
London
EC1V 0HB
United Kingdom

About

Background

Dr Plagnol received her BA in European Economic Studies from Otto-Friedrich-Universitaet Bamberg, Germany in 2001 and an MA and PhD in Economics from the University of Southern California, USA in 2005 and 2007 respectively. Following her PhD, she was a postdoctoral researcher in the Sociology Department at the University of Cambridge. At Cambridge, she had an Early Career Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust and the Isaac Newton Trust, Cambridge. She was also a Research Fellow at Darwin College, Cambridge.

She joined City University London in May 2013 as a Lecturer.

Research

PhD supervision

Dr Plagnol would welcome enquiries from potential PhD students interested in any of the above mentioned areas.

Research funding

Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship, April 2010 - April 2013
Project title: Female labour force participation and well-being
Salary support and research expenses

Isaac Newton Trust, Cambridge, April 2010 - April 2013
provided matching funding for Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship

Publications

  1. Plagnol, A.C. (2011). Financial satisfaction over the life course: The influence of assets and liabilities. Journal of Economic Psychology, 32(1), pp. 45–64. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2010.10.006.
  2. Piasna, A. and Plagnol, A. (2015). Job quality and women’s labour market participation. Brussels: European Trade Union Institute.

Book (1)

  1. Scott, J.L., Dex, S. and Plagnol, A.C. (Eds.), (2012). Gendered Lives: Gender Inequalities in Production and Reproduction. Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84980-626-8.

Chapter (4)

  1. Plagnol, A. (2014). Chasing the 'good life': gender differences in work aspirations of American men and women. In Eckermann, E. (Ed.), Gender, Lifespan and Quality of Life - An international perspective Springer. ISBN 978-94-007-7828-3.
  2. Scott, J.L. and Plagnol, A.C. (2012). Work-family conflict and well-being in Northern Europe. In Scott, J.L., Dex, S. and Plagnol, A.C. (Eds.), Gendered Lives: Gender Inequalities in Production and Reproduction Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN 1-84980-626-8.
  3. Scott, J., Dex, S., Joshi, H. and Plagnol, A. (2012). Introduction: Gender inequalities in production and reproduction. In Scott, J.L., Dex, S. and Plagnol, A.C. (Eds.), Gendered Lives: Gender Inequalities in Production and Reproduction Edward Elgar Pub. ISBN 978-1-84980-626-8.
  4. Scott, J.L., Plagnol, A. and Nolan, J. (2010). Perceptions of quality of life: Gender differences across the life course. In Scott, J. and Lyonette, C. (Eds.), Gender Inequalities in the 21st Century (pp. 193–212). Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84844-438-6.

Journal Article (12)

  1. Gerson, J., Plagnol, A.C. and Corr, P.J. (2016). Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior, 63, pp. 813–822. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023.
  2. Piasna, A. and Plagnol, A. (2016). Arbeitsplatzqualität und weibliche Erwerbsbeteiligung in Europa (Job quality and women's labour market participation in Europe). WSI-Mitteilungen, 69(4), pp. 273–282.
  3. Shemyakina, O.N. and Plagnol, A. (2013). Ethnicity, subjective well-being and armed conflict: Evidence from Bosnia-Herzegovina. Social Indicators Research, 113(3), pp. 1129–1152. doi:10.1007/s11205-012-0131-8.
  4. Plagnol, A. and Scott, J. (2011). What matters for well-being: Individual perceptions of quality of life before and after important life events. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 6(2), pp. 115–137.
  5. Plagnol, A.C. (2011). Financial satisfaction over the life course: The influence of assets and liabilities. Journal of Economic Psychology, 32(1), pp. 45–64. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2010.10.006.
  6. Plagnol, A. (2010). Subjective well-being over the life course:
    Conceptualizations and evaluations.
    Social Research: an international quarterly of the social sciences, 77(2), pp. 749–768.
  7. Plagnol, A.C. and Huppert, F.A. (2010). Happy to Help? Exploring the Factors Associated with Variations in Rates of Volunteering Across Europe. SOCIAL INDICATORS RESEARCH, 97(2), pp. 157–176. doi:10.1007/s11205-009-9494-x.
  8. Scott, J., Nolan, J. and Plagnol, A. (2009). Panel data and open-ended questions: Understanding perceptions of quality of life. Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences, 4(2), pp. 123–135.
  9. Plagnol, A., Rowley, E., Martin, P. and Livesey, F. (2009). Industry perceptions of the barriers to commercialization of regenerative medicine products in the UK. Regenerative Medicine, 4(4), pp. 549–559.
  10. Plagnol, A. and Easterlin, R.A. (2008). Aspirations, attainments, and satisfaction: Life cycle differences between American women and men. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9(4), pp. 601–619.
  11. Easterlin, R.A. and Plagnol, A.C. (2008). Life satisfaction and economic conditions in East and West Germany pre- and post-unification. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 68(3-4), pp. 433–444. doi:10.1016/j.jebo.2008.06.009.
  12. Zimmermann, A.C. and Easterlin, R.A. (2006). Happily ever after? Cohabitation, marriage, divorce, and happiness in Germany. Population and Development Review, 32(3), pp. 511–528. doi:10.1111/j.1728-4457.2006.00135.x.

Report (1)

  1. Piasna, A. and Plagnol, A. (2015). Job quality and women’s labour market participation. Brussels: European Trade Union Institute.

Other Activities

Editorial Activity (1)

  1. Editorial Board member of Social Indicators Research (since August 2013)

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City, University of London

Northampton Square

London EC1V 0HB

United Kingdom

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