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  1. Learning at City Conference 2017
  2. Posters
Learning Enhancement and Development

Poster 12

Student approaches to lecture capture: a case study at Cass Business School

Ms Jo Richardson - Learning Enhancement and Development (LEaD), City, University of London
Mrs Jackie Dawes - Cass Business School, City, University of London
Mr James Stewart  - Learning Enhancement and Development (LEaD), City, University of London

This poster will present a case study sharing how lecture capture is being used to support student success at Cass Business School. It will present usage data across modules, sharing lessons learned about student approaches and whether this technology has any discernible impact on areas like attainment and module feedback.

  • Presentation of statistical data relating to how and when students are using lecture capture resources at Cass Business School.
  • Analysis of any possible impact of lecture capture on factors such as attainment and module feedback.
  • Comparison of available evidence from Cass Business School to current research into students' use of lecture capture.
  • Overview of the strategic approaches to embedding lecture capture as a technology enhanced learning tool in the Business School and other schools at City.

Cass Business School formally launched lecture capture as a technology enhanced learning approach in September 2014. In 2016, after significant take-up throughout the school, work was begun to gain a deeper understanding of how the technology was being used by students at Cass. This work explored student usage data from the lecture capture system, as well as making use of feedback from student representatives and module questionnaires.

The current literature around lecture capture broadens our understanding of how students use lecture capture. It has been proposed that the use of recordings can improve attainment (Owston et al, 2011), increase course satisfaction (Vajoczki et al, 2011) and that the main student use is to support assessment preparation (Von Konsky et al, 2009). Other research finds that while ostensibly student demand for recorded lectures is high, usage figures are low (Pond, 2016) and impact on attainment is limited (Leadbeater et al, 2013). This poster will draw comparisons with these theories, to explore how the perceptions and usage patterns of Cass students fit with the current evidence base.

The poster will be of relevance to those using lecture capture in other schools at City, who would like greater insight into approaches for analysing students' use of lecture capture and the impact of the technology.

References:

Leadbeater, W., Shuttleworth, T., Couperthwaite, J. and Nightingale, K.P., 2013. Evaluating the use and impact of lecture recording in undergraduates: Evidence for distinct approaches by different groups of students. Computers & Education, 61, pp.185-192.

Owston, R., Lupshenyuk, D., & Wideman, H. (2011). Lecture capture in large undergraduate classes: Student perceptions and academic performance. The Internet and Higher Education, 14(4), 262-268.

Pond, K., Witthaus, G., Lambert, S. (2016) Evidence based policy in technology enhanced learning – the case of lecture capture. ICERI2016 Proceedings, pp. 7559-7559.

Vajoczki, S., Watt, S., Marquis, N., Liao, R. and Vine, M., 2011. Students approach to learning and their use of lecture capture. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 20(2), pp.195-214.

Von Konsky, B.R., Ivins, J. and Gribble, S.J., 2009. Lecture attendance and web based lecture technologies: A comparison of student perceptions and usage patterns. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 25(4).

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