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  1. Student and Academic Services
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  3. Student Conduct
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Student Conduct

These pages provide you with information about the mechanisms for investigating misconduct and academic misconduct.  It is important that you familiarise yourself with the Regulations and Codes of Conduct applicable to you as you will be expected to abide by them.  Visit the student information about student conduct pages for further information.

What is misconduct?

City has different definitions and procedures for misconduct, academic misconduct and for bullying and harassment.

  • Misconduct can be defined as improper interference, in the broadest sense, with the proper functioning or activities of City or those who study or work in it, including actions which damage City.
    Examples might include: disruption of the activities of City; threatening or offensive behaviour or language; fraud, deceit or deception; breaches of the Codes of Conduct; behaviour which brings City into disrepute; failure to comply with professional codes of behaviour where a programme of study is linked to a particular profession.
  • Academic misconduct is any action that produces an improper advantage for the student in relation to his/her assessment or deliberately and unnecessarily disadvantages other students.
    Examples of academic misconduct include plagiarism, cheating, collusion, impersonation, falsification or fabrication, duplication or self-plagiarism, ghosting, and disruption.
  • Bullying can be defined as offensive, intimidating, malicious or insulting behaviour, or an abuse or misuse of power through means that undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the recipient.
    Examples of bullying include: shouting at, humiliating ignoring or excluding an individual, frightening someone with physical or other threats, or using social media to publish material that is offensive about an individual or groups.
  • Harassment can be defined as unwanted conduct that has the purpose or effect of violating an individual's dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for that individual.
    Examples of harassment include: remarks, gossip or jokes about an individual; unwanted attention of someone including on social media, text messages, or email, or following, stalking or spying on someone.

How do I request a review of alleged misconduct by a City, University of London student?

If you experience behaviour that could be classified as misconduct caused by a City, University of London student, you may raise this in writing through City's Student Complaints process . You should set out the allegations clearly in writing, stating exactly what happened and when. You should include any evidence or documentation you have to support the allegations and also include any information about efforts you have made to try and resolve the issue.

What will happen if an allegation of misconduct is made against me?

City's Student Discipline Regulation and Student Discipline Policy lay out the way in which allegations of misconduct will be managed.  These cover both taught and research students and Appendix B of the Regulation covers students on Validated Programmes.  You may also find it helpful to refer to the Student Discipline flowchart.  All these documents are found in Section 4 of the Quality Manual.

In any case of reported misconduct, you will be notified and will be given the opportunity to respond before any conclusion is reached.

It is recommended that you contact the Union Support Service who offer a free, confidential advice service for students.

What will happen if an allegation of academic misconduct is made against me?

Instances of suspected academic misconduct are managed firstly in accordance with the Assessment Regulations and Assessment and Feedback Policy (for taught students) or in accordance with the Masters Degree by Research or Doctoral Programmes Regulations (for research students).   Taught students can find further information in Section 6 of the Quality Manual.  Research students can find further information in Section 9 of the Quality Manual.

If the case is referred to University-level, it is managed in accordance with the Student Discipline Regulations and the Student Discipline Policy.  You may also find it helpful to refer to the Student Discipline flowchart.  All these documents are found in Section 4 of the Quality Manual.

It is recommended that you contact the Union Support Service who offer a free, confidential advice service for students.

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City, University of London is an independent member institution of the University of London. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University of London consists of 18 independent member institutions with outstanding global reputations and several prestigious central academic bodies and activities.